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Planted tank good or bad for beginners??

This is a discussion on Planted tank good or bad for beginners?? within the Beginner Planted Aquarium forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> Plants will grow just fine in gravel. I will tell ya tho, trying to re enact a natural environment became more important to me ...

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Planted tank good or bad for beginners??
Old 07-11-2013, 07:07 PM   #11
 
Plants will grow just fine in gravel. I will tell ya tho, trying to re enact a natural environment became more important to me the more i got into the hobby and now i wish jnwould have started with a sandy substrate as opposed to gravel. I am changing all my substrates to eco complete ( just because i prefer it). I feel like my tanks with gravel look like a seafood restaurant aquarium hahah. Not that gravel tanks cant look nice, i just prefer the more natural sandy/ dirt look. Get whatever you enjoy. I do suggest some nice driftwood. Its beautiful and adds a really nice touch to ur tank. IF you like it :) happy tanking
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Old 07-12-2013, 12:41 AM   #12
 
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Originally Posted by NewFishFiend View Post
Plants will grow just fine in gravel. I will tell ya tho, trying to re enact a natural environment became more important to me the more i got into the hobby and now i wish jnwould have started with a sandy substrate as opposed to gravel. I am changing all my substrates to eco complete ( just because i prefer it). I feel like my tanks with gravel look like a seafood restaurant aquarium hahah. Not that gravel tanks cant look nice, i just prefer the more natural sandy/ dirt look. Get whatever you enjoy. I do suggest some nice driftwood. Its beautiful and adds a really nice touch to ur tank. IF you like it :) happy tanking
I feel the same way! I like the natural look it gives. I will have to find some driftwood to go with the tank.
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Old 07-12-2013, 02:58 AM   #13
 
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I think some of the easier plants would be good to try as a beginner. :) Don't get anything too picky though! I have some crypts, java fern, and anubias that I neglected for over a year... hardly any light, no water changes, no filter, no fertilization... my fish tank was just sitting empty with plants, and they are still alive. The fern and anubias died back and aren't doing amazing, but it appears they are hard to kill. In fact, the crypts reproduce a bit. So, I think as a beginner you should try some of those maybe.
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Old 07-12-2013, 12:18 PM   #14
JDM
 
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I wasn't going to wade in as there are lots of opinions here already. In my view, it doesn't matter if you do or don't go with plants... although they are a benefit to the fish and interesting in their own right It's all a matter of what you research. You already are looking into setting up a tank and the fact that you are asking questions beforehand means that you can start out however you want and avoid all the errors that listening to some petstores and unknown sources might introduce.

The short stories:

Starting with plants allows you to ignore the need for a nitrogen cycle, add fish immediately and build up the shoals gradually... the more plants the more fish can be added at once. They act as filters to a degree and absorb ammonia and nitrates from the water (how much depends on plant selection and mix) and helps with the overall water quality. Lighting and fertilization are considerations.

Starting without plants with a fully developed cycle can allow you to add lots of fish at once, which has it's advantages, but the cycle can take a month or more to establish depending upon techniques used. More care needs to be taken with water quality as it is entirely up to you.

In the end, both methods will get you to the same endpoint at about the same time so it is really a matter of which you think you will prefer. You can always add plants after the fact... or you can remove them later if you don't like them.

Jeff.
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