Plant ID Help (crypt look-a-like with thick tall stem)
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Beginner Freshwater Aquarium » Beginner Planted Aquarium » Plant ID Help (crypt look-a-like with thick tall stem)

Plant ID Help (crypt look-a-like with thick tall stem)

This is a discussion on Plant ID Help (crypt look-a-like with thick tall stem) within the Beginner Planted Aquarium forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> Does anyone know what this is? I'm worried, it looks as though it will need higher light. Middle plant with green/maroon leaves...

Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
Plant ID Help (crypt look-a-like with thick tall stem)
Old 12-29-2011, 12:14 AM   #1
 
kangy's Avatar
 
Plant ID Help (crypt look-a-like with thick tall stem)

Does anyone know what this is? I'm worried, it looks as though it will need higher light.



Middle plant with green/maroon leaves
kangy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2011, 04:10 PM   #2
 
Byron's Avatar
 
My guess would be one of the reddish/pinkish colour forms of Hygrophila corymbosa. It is a stem plant, and needs good light. I have no luck with even the basic green form with my moderate lighting.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2011, 04:23 PM   #3
 
kangy's Avatar
 
Thanks Byron, that's what I was worried about. I have one in the 10g with two 10w GE 6500k CFL running 9 hrs right now (freshly planted) and I have two in the 29g with one Aqueon 8000k Daylight bulb running 9 hours. The 10g definately seems brighter than the 29g and the greens seem brighter. I think I might change the 29g to a standard 6500k Daylight tube from home depot. Either way I'll bee keeping my eye on them

What is your experience with Ludwigia Repens. I'm worried I won't have enough light for that either.
kangy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2011, 04:32 PM   #4
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kangy View Post
Thanks Byron, that's what I was worried about. I have one in the 10g with two 10w GE 6500k CFL running 9 hrs right now (freshly planted) and I have two in the 29g with one Aqueon 8000k Daylight bulb running 9 hours. The 10g definately seems brighter than the 29g and the greens seem brighter. I think I might change the 29g to a standard 6500k Daylight tube from home depot. Either way I'll bee keeping my eye on them

What is your experience with Ludwigia Repens. I'm worried I won't have enough light for that either.
I haven't tried Ludwigia for years. I tend to avoid stem plants because I know they will not do well. Except for Brazilian Pennywort, which grows like a weed. Most recently I tried Hygrophila corymbosa and H. difformis (Wisteria), both slowly turned to bare stems over a period of several months. Light is simply not sufficient.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2011, 04:45 PM   #5
 
Quantum's Avatar
 
The spectral output of that Aqueon bulb looks pretty good (shown on the website), changing it to a 6500K may not have the effect you hope for. Just because a bulb appears brighter to us doesn't mean that there is more light energy output. If two bulbs of equal wattage (either electrical input or light output) the one that appears brighter to us will almost certainly emit less red and blue (needed for photosynthesis) wavelength light. This is because the human eye is more sensitive to some wavelengths than to others.
Quantum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2011, 06:19 PM   #6
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quantum View Post
The spectral output of that Aqueon bulb looks pretty good (shown on the website), changing it to a 6500K may not have the effect you hope for. Just because a bulb appears brighter to us doesn't mean that there is more light energy output. If two bulbs of equal wattage (either electrical input or light output) the one that appears brighter to us will almost certainly emit less red and blue (needed for photosynthesis) wavelength light. This is because the human eye is more sensitive to some wavelengths than to others.
This is very true. However, unless they tell us the intensity (lumens, or even lux would help) I would be cautious. In my experience when I have been able to ascertain these stats, the red/blue wavelength tubes tend to be about half the intensity of the full spectrum/daylight. I'm thinking particularly of the Aqua-Glo compared to Life-Glo as an example.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2011, 10:13 AM   #7
 
Quantum's Avatar
 
I can't argue with your statement, but I will respectfully suggest that you are a bit mistaken in the conclusion you have derived from it.


There is no need to get into it too in-depth since it is largely a matter of technical mumbo-jumbo vs real world results (and there is no denying your success in this regard), but if you are interested in where I'm coming from see: luminous flux vs radiant flux and the luminosity function. If you then compare spectral output graphs of the bulbs mentioned with the luminosity function graph in this context, I think you will see why bulbs of similar wattage (either electrical input or electromagnetic energy output) can have significantly different lumen output, and also why it is largely irrelevant vis-a-vis photosynthesis.
Quantum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2011, 01:53 PM   #8
 
redchigh's Avatar
 
Me and Byron had this same discussion a while back...

Then I came across a chapter in Ecology of the Planted Aquarium by Diana L. Walstad. Turns out several years back there was a conclusive experiment done comparing 'full spectrum' aquarium bulbs with plain cool white or equal wattage.

The best growth was seen in a mixture of the two bulbs, but when used singly, cheaper cool white outperformed all 'plant' bulbs tested.

Even if the growth were similiar, I would not consider 'plant' bulbs worth the cost. Even from my own observations, cool white is superior.

I know all the scientific reasons why it shouldn't be true...
Plants mostly need 660 and 440nm to grow, as proven by plant LED bulbs, and cool white spits out more green light than anything.
They are generally lower wattage than plant bulbs, which should mean less light.
They're cheaper and don't have a plant on the package, I know...

I've tested tanks side by side too (although not as extensively as the person in Diana's book) and my results were the same... However, I found sunlight is superior to both.

This discussion is not really related to 'Plant ID Help', so make another topic if you want to discuss.

If I had to make an educated guess on the plant, I would say Hygrophila Corymbosa 'Kompakt' (or Compacta) , but it also reminds me of Hygrophila polysperma 'Rosanervig'. Maybe Tropica finally invented a Hygrophila Corymbosa 'Kompakt Rosanervig' . That's really what it looks like, and is theoretically possible since 'Rosanervig' is the name of a plant virus that turns them pink... I'm confused because the corymbrosas usually turn more of a bronze color, or silvery green...
redchigh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2011, 09:05 PM   #9
 
Quantum's Avatar
 
That experiment sounds interesting, it raises some questions and will gladly continue the conversation if anyone else cares to.
Quantum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2011, 09:20 PM   #10
 
kangy's Avatar
 
Thanks everyone for your replies! I have been following your discussion on lighting all day and am very interested, hope you do continue it. Your more than welcome to hijack this thread as lighting on the new plants was/is a concern. I will post back in a couple weeks how the growth compares in the two tanks. Water conditions are nearly identical,and fert rising is done in both every 4 days with flourish comp. Only variable in tanks other than fish is the lighting. Oh and i still have the small HOB in the 10g (ordered a sponge today).
kangy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Plant problems and need a hardy stem plant SomeDudeAtHome Beginner Planted Aquarium 11 07-01-2011 01:56 PM
Amazon plant growing long stem with leaves growing out along the stem. javentura Beginner Planted Aquarium 8 04-22-2011 07:21 PM
identify this stem plant luckysarah Beginner Planted Aquarium 5 12-10-2010 09:20 AM
How do you plant most stem plants Gerardo756 Beginner Planted Aquarium 1 08-06-2010 09:15 AM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:48 PM.