Plant ID and feed - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 7 Old 12-12-2010, 05:06 PM Thread Starter
New Member
 
Plant ID and feed

Hi, I've just set up my 48L tank yesterday, and fitted 3 live plants all the same, and 1 smaller plant that I think is different, I'm currently cycling the tank, but the plants already seem to be dying, could anyone tell me what plants I have, and what feed they take?

Many Thanks
Posted via Mobile Device
Raisis is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 7 Old 12-12-2010, 05:20 PM Thread Starter
New Member
 
Pictures of my plants and tank.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Plant 1.jpg (111.1 KB, 29 views)
File Type: jpg Tank White.jpg (104.2 KB, 29 views)
Raisis is offline  
post #3 of 7 Old 12-13-2010, 05:54 PM
Member
 
Byron's Avatar
 
First, welcome to Tropical Fish Keeping forum.

Second, I have moved your two posts to the Aquarium Plants section.

Third, to your plants, which are all commonly called sword plants. The 3 larger plants are probably Echinodorus bleherae which is the most commonly-available sword [though the exact species is debatable, but never mind that now]. I would separate these, they get quite large and need a good depth of substrate for their extensive root systems and space to "open up." Perhaps one in each rear corner (out from the corners a few inches) and one between but not exactly as that can look artificial; or one at the back just left of centre, one in the right corner, one in between and more to the front--or something. You can read more of this plant in our profiles, second tab from the left in the blue bar across the top, or when the name is exactly the same in posts it is shaded, as it is above, and you can click on the name to see that profile.

The smaller plant is one of the pygmy chain sword species, probably Helanthium tenellum [which used to be called Echinodorus tenellus and will still be seen under this name frequently]. It is also in our profiles; as you will read there, the existing leaves are the emersed form and these will yellow and die off and new growth will be different.

Sword plants frequently lose some (or all) of the older outer leaves when moved to a new environment. You will notice new growth from the centre of the crown, and as long as new green leaves appear, the plant is basically healthy. However, they do need food--nutrients. A good plant fertilizer is Seachem's Flourish Comprehensive Supplement for the Planted Aquarium. It is complete, and once or twice a week is all you use; for a 48 litre/12 gallon tank, about 1/4 teaspoon each dose is all you need, it is highly concentrated. This is in my view the best preparation available, but if you can';t find it, Nutrafin's Plant-Gro liquid should also work, though you will use much more of it. I would definitely go with the Flourish, just make sure it is the Comprehensive as they make several different products in the Flourish line.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
Byron is offline  
post #4 of 7 Old 12-14-2010, 04:17 AM Thread Starter
New Member
 
Thanks Byron, I was able to find and purchase Nutrafin Plant Gro, so I got 3 30ml bottles, but il do some hunting for flourish. Il space the swords out a bit more too. Many thanks for the advice.
Posted via Mobile Device
Raisis is offline  
post #5 of 7 Old 12-14-2010, 10:10 AM
Member
 
redchigh's Avatar
 
Think they need to be removed from the pots?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Christople View Post
^^ genius
__________________

Soil Substrates Guide:
Part 1
--------- Part 2

_____________________
redchigh is offline  
post #6 of 7 Old 12-14-2010, 10:52 AM Thread Starter
New Member
 
I dont know, I left them in the pots, because theh seem to float otherwise, but if they need to come out, il take them out.
Posted via Mobile Device
Raisis is offline  
post #7 of 7 Old 12-14-2010, 12:20 PM
Member
 
Byron's Avatar
 
I didn't notice the pots in the aquarium photo. Yes, I would remove those clay pots carefully, and unwrap as much of the rock wool (the white stuff) as you can, being careful not to damage the roots too much. If you find that there is more than one plant in each pot, as often occurs, separate them. As I mentioned, these plants have very extensive root systems and need substrate space.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
Byron is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Calling all plant folks...help plant my tank Peanut72 Beginner Planted Aquarium 37 10-07-2010 06:47 PM
Identify plant and suggestions on plant arrangements saulat Beginner Planted Aquarium 3 06-22-2009 07:04 PM
ATTN Plant Xperts.....Need plant help (newbie ?) bigk_54 Beginner Planted Aquarium 10 09-09-2008 08:13 AM

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome