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one step closer to nature

This is a discussion on one step closer to nature within the Beginner Planted Aquarium forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> I'll try to get a picture for you tonight, basically though you get one of those splitters. Run a short tube from the pump ...

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one step closer to nature
Old 02-15-2012, 02:38 PM   #11
 
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I'll try to get a picture for you tonight, basically though you get one of those splitters. Run a short tube from the pump to the splitter (gang valve). One line from there goes to the filter, the other attach a short strip of tube (or however long you want it) and attach an airstone (helps muffle the "exhaust"). Turn the line to the filter all the way up and the line to the bleeder airstone all the way off (leave the airstone out of the water, mine just hangs out in the stand next to the pump) Then slowly open the valve to the airstone to slow the flow to the filter until you get the desired output. It should be just fast enough so that you can't see individual bubbles so a slow steady stream of air)

I actually did an experiment with a cup and found that this setting actually produces more water outflow from the filter than the airpump going full blast direct to the filter. Remember that uplift tube is only so big, if it's packed wall to wall with air, there isn't much room left for the water to go up the tube ;)
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Old 02-15-2012, 06:42 PM   #12
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kangy View Post
I'll try to get a picture for you tonight, basically though you get one of those splitters. Run a short tube from the pump to the splitter (gang valve). One line from there goes to the filter, the other attach a short strip of tube (or however long you want it) and attach an airstone (helps muffle the "exhaust"). Turn the line to the filter all the way up and the line to the bleeder airstone all the way off (leave the airstone out of the water, mine just hangs out in the stand next to the pump) Then slowly open the valve to the airstone to slow the flow to the filter until you get the desired output. It should be just fast enough so that you can't see individual bubbles so a slow steady stream of air)

I actually did an experiment with a cup and found that this setting actually produces more water outflow from the filter than the airpump going full blast direct to the filter. Remember that uplift tube is only so big, if it's packed wall to wall with air, there isn't much room left for the water to go up the tube ;)
Thanks you. I've got it. You don't need to send me a pic. I actually bought one of those, but didn't understand how it worked, so it was just sitting around. I'll hook it up the way you say. This will be great, because the bubbling does sound like water boiling :)

Gwen
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Old 02-16-2012, 10:08 AM   #13
 
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ANYWHOOO....

I was kinda hoping someone had some input as to weather I was being premature about turning the filter off or turning it back on. Theres always so much detritus and other crap in the tank I dont suppose a sponge is a viable option. It would be caked with crud in a day, and cause a cloud when I tried to remove it to clean it.
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Old 02-16-2012, 10:10 AM   #14
 
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Detritus does sort of 'flare up' when you first turn the filter off... If you have a gravel substrate (instead of sand) it will settle down and fertilise your plants... Snails and shrimp (if an option) will help the detritus break down.
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Old 02-16-2012, 10:20 AM   #15
 
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As that stuff settles it will enrich your substrate and the plants will utilize it, if there is enough collecting to cause problems with your bio system you are overstocked or feeding too much. The stuff in the water column will either settle or get worked into the sponge filter (it traps the really fine particles very well). However, I know EXACTLY where you are coming from, it was a huge leap of faith for me to reverse my old "must have massive filtration" mindset and remove my HOB after going planted. It's hard to honestly answer your question as I don't know the full background on your tank, I do think though you are doing the same thing I was though and that is having a constant battle between what you have always done/known and letting nature actually take over. Here's a way to look at it. How much experience do you have? Now how much experience does nature have? All you need in a planted tank is mechanical filtration to help polish the water. During my weekly water changes I ligthly swirl the hose about an inch from the substrate to pick up any large loose particles, the rest of it I look at as free food for my root feeders.

I personally would not go filterless, Others have had success with this method, then again others also claim to never change the tank water and have success. Simply put (credit for this phrase goes to Byron) A sponge filter is the best possible filtration you can have in a planted tank under 55g, period.
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Old 02-16-2012, 05:56 PM   #16
 
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lol right on guys, good call on both posts. Perhaps it was too much a leap of faith, I have my AC20 going still, only I took everything out but the mech sponge, and I moved it as to not disturb the plants. Ill grab another Hydro sponge when I order next.

Thanks :)
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Old 02-16-2012, 09:22 PM   #17
 
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I've been reading up on no tech and/or filterless tank. Still learning, but...

If you still have the same stock in the 20L as your Aquarium Log lists, you have WAY too many fish to go filterless.
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Old 02-16-2012, 10:30 PM   #18
 
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Although I dont agree with nonfiltered stagnent tanks for fish. Here is a link to a guy thats been doing it for like 30 years. He may be able to help you.

http://www.aquariumforum.com/f15/my-...ods-26410.html
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Old 02-16-2012, 11:04 PM   #19
 
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Non-filtered does not necessarily equate with stagnate. The are many fish that come from still pools/ponds in the wild, and very plant heavy/lightly stocked tanks can work beautifully once the balance is struck. Believe me, I' a big 'ol animal rights activist and I think this is healthy when done right.

It just difficult to do, is all.
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Old 02-17-2012, 11:20 AM   #20
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MinaMinaMina View Post
If you still have the same stock in the 20L as your Aquarium Log lists, you have WAY too many fish to go filterless.
I disagree.. I think that depends on the plant load ;)
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