Is this normal for Rotala? - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
 
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post #1 of 9 Old 01-01-2012, 01:59 PM Thread Starter
Is this normal for Rotala?

Okay another question...My Rotala looks like it has a root hanging from every node. Is this how it is supposed to be? Also looks like there is a whole other stem coming off of one with little roots on it but no leaves.



30 gallon:
6 Harlequin Rasbora
2 Bolivian Rams (1M/1F)
4 Corydoras Melanistius
2 Peppered Cory
1 Sunburst Platy (M)
1 Guppy (M)
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post #2 of 9 Old 01-01-2012, 02:04 PM
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Yes I would say that is normal. Most stem plants will put out roots at each node. If you don't like the roots there you can simplify cut them off. When I had rotala indica they put off roots on a couple of the bottom nodes. Close to the substrate but the upper ones usually didn't.
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post #3 of 9 Old 01-01-2012, 02:04 PM
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My rotala is exactly the same, however I cannot tell you if thats how it is meant to be. I dont really prune my plants, just give them what they need and let nature take over
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post #4 of 9 Old 01-01-2012, 02:07 PM Thread Starter
Sweet. Thats what I thought, since most of it was like that when I got it. Doesnt look bad so I will just leave it. Thanks!

30 gallon:
6 Harlequin Rasbora
2 Bolivian Rams (1M/1F)
4 Corydoras Melanistius
2 Peppered Cory
1 Sunburst Platy (M)
1 Guppy (M)
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post #5 of 9 Old 01-01-2012, 02:42 PM
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Just a caution on cutting off these roots: they are assimilating the necessary nutrients for the plant. Stem plants generally assimilate nutrients via the roots and leaves, and directly from the water. So the roots appearing from each node are crucial to the health of the plant. The roots in the substrate are more of an anchor to hold the stems down.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #6 of 9 Old 01-01-2012, 03:00 PM Thread Starter
Thanks Byron. I was planning on leaving them, now I definitely will.

30 gallon:
6 Harlequin Rasbora
2 Bolivian Rams (1M/1F)
4 Corydoras Melanistius
2 Peppered Cory
1 Sunburst Platy (M)
1 Guppy (M)
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post #7 of 9 Old 01-01-2012, 04:08 PM
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I will say this about cutting the roots and this is what I have heard and from my experience (for this plant especially). Now I know stem plants get nutrients from roots and leaves but I have been told you can cut the roots on the nodes and be okay. I have personally done this with this plant and never had a problem with it growing healthy. Not saying it is best for the plant or that you should do it just saying I have done it and it was Ok.
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post #8 of 9 Old 01-01-2012, 05:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boredomb View Post
I will say this about cutting the roots and this is what I have heard and from my experience (for this plant especially). Now I know stem plants get nutrients from roots and leaves but I have been told you can cut the roots on the nodes and be okay. I have personally done this with this plant and never had a problem with it growing healthy. Not saying it is best for the plant or that you should do it just saying I have done it and it was Ok.
That makes sense. Plants will attempt to photosynthesize full out, meaning as fast and as much as they possibly can, and this of course is totally dependent upon the light and nutrients. As long as both are available (and light is sufficient in intensity and spectrum) the plant will photosynthesize full out. Hence, the increase of roots to achieve this. Cutting back the roots, provided obviously it is not detrimentally severe, may slow photosynthesis but it will still occur. Cutting back roots also invigorates the plant in most cases, resulting perhaps in a growth spurt--and likely more roots. And I don't know the conditions in the OP's setup so all this has to be taken in that context. B.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #9 of 9 Old 01-01-2012, 08:05 PM
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True I don't know the condition of the OPs setup in my tank I have or had Less then 1 wpg and they grew like a weed in between trimming I would cut the roots off the nodes. Sometimes I would cut the stem at a node where roots were present then I would plant the stem back. The plant grew very good for me and pretty fast also. Which makes sense with what you were saying Byron.
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