Need help with choosing plants? ? ? - Page 2
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Beginner Freshwater Aquarium » Beginner Planted Aquarium » Need help with choosing plants? ? ?

Need help with choosing plants? ? ?

This is a discussion on Need help with choosing plants? ? ? within the Beginner Planted Aquarium forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> i have a 28l planted tank and 6 platys.I put in 1 Amazon sword, 2 Green Cabomba and 2 Dwarf Swords. Look in the ...

Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
Need help with choosing plants? ? ?
Old 02-24-2011, 01:29 PM   #11
 
i have a 28l planted tank and 6 platys.I put in 1 Amazon sword, 2 Green Cabomba and 2 Dwarf Swords. Look in the profiles for them. They all seem to be doing really well but the Cabomba grows very fast. this may be good if your looking to fill a big tank but i have to prune like once a month otherwise it becomes too big for my tank.

thats just what i chose hope it helps
NeonRainbow123 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to NeonRainbow123 For This Useful Post:
Boredomb (02-24-2011)
Old 02-24-2011, 01:51 PM   #12
 
Boredomb's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post

A new fixture with 48-inch tubes would work better. This would spread the light full length, and allow you some options. I had a single T12 tube over my 55g years ago, and managed well with swords and crypts. The T8 tubes are better, more intense light and in better spectrum now from what was available back then (1980). You could go with a dual-tube T8 fixture. This allows you to have two different tubes, which is nice with respect to the colour rendition. A single-tube T5 would work, but not a dual-tube T5. T5 HO (high output) tubes are very bright by comparison, one is equal to 1.5 T8 tubes of the same type (spectrum) in intensity, and you really do not want more than two T8 tubes over a 55g for a low-tech or natural setup. The T5 NO (normal output) tubes are comparable to T8 but very hard to find.

I can suggest tubes if you ask.

Byron.
I was trying to find a fixture the other day here at locale fish store well I didn't get anything from that guy he keep pushing for me to get a dual T5 HO fixture which I had heard was bad but he says was good for growing plants which also looked like he was using over his planted tank that he sales out of. THere is one question I have although you may think this is a stupid question I know there are different fixtures for the T5 HO but when it comes to the rest of the bulbs are there different fixtures for those as well? I guess What I am asking If I just go and get a dual 48" fixture/hood will a T8 fit in it or does it have to be just T8? and as far as the tubs any suggestions you can give me would be GREAT!!! thanks for alll the info!!!
Boredomb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2011, 03:30 PM   #13
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boredomb View Post
I was trying to find a fixture the other day here at locale fish store well I didn't get anything from that guy he keep pushing for me to get a dual T5 HO fixture which I had heard was bad but he says was good for growing plants which also looked like he was using over his planted tank that he sales out of. THere is one question I have although you may think this is a stupid question I know there are different fixtures for the T5 HO but when it comes to the rest of the bulbs are there different fixtures for those as well? I guess What I am asking If I just go and get a dual 48" fixture/hood will a T8 fit in it or does it have to be just T8? and as far as the tubs any suggestions you can give me would be GREAT!!! thanks for alll the info!!!
The "T" refers to the diameter of the tube, in 8ths. So a T8 is 8/8 or 1 inch, a T12 is 12/8 or 1.5 inches, a T5 is 5/8 inch. But, as you mention, not all tubes fit all fixtures. This is due to the prongs at the end plus the ballast.

A "normal" fluorescent fixture will take T8 and T12. T8 tubes in some of the older fixtures have some issues, but as T12 tubes are being phased out we can skip this. T5 only fits in T5 fixtures, so once you purchase a T5 fixture you are confined to T5 tubes.

T5 comes in NO (normal output) and HO (high output). [I think there is another too, even higher, that I've seen online, SHO or something.] The NO are approximately equal to the same type (length, spectrum, K, etc) T8, but finding T5 NO is not easy. No stores in my area carry them. m All fish stores carry the T5 HO, usually the Hagen "Glo" line. The tubes are expensive, $50 each here. A T8 in the same Hagen series is $30. And an equally-good daylight T8 from Home Depot by Phillips is 2 for $8. This is one reason I recommend T8 over T5. Given that all these need replacing before they "burn out" it can get expensive.

So, the T5 fixture he wanted to sell you will only take T5 tubes, and probably both need to be in to work; unless they are individually switched (rare, and much more expensive) both tubes have to be in for them to light. I tried a dual T5 HO last year, and over my 5-foot 115g tank is was way too bright; over a 55g 4-foot tank imagine the brightness. There are times when this can work--high-tech, CO2 diffusion, lots of plants, daily fertilization of nutrients--but that is not what we have been considering.

The dual T8 will be fine. All Glass make these, I bought two of them last year and I like them; I believe they are very well made. The tubes that came with them went straight to recycling, and I bought good tubes from Home Depot. Which brings me to your question about tubes.

Phillips, Sylvania and GE make T8 tubes that you can buy in hardware stores and home improvement stores. They are cheap, by comparison. The "daylight" type, whatever specific name they may be, have a kelvin rating around 6500K and these work very well. I use them. I also use Life-Glo 2 made by Hagen. I got a bunch of these at 1/5 cost from a local fish store closing out. At full cost I might not be so quick to buy them, although they are very good light. Over my smaller single-tube tanks this is what i always use, the Life-Glo 2 which has a 6700K rating and a very good spectrum.

The advantage of two T8 tubes is mixing colour. I know Mikaila likes a cooler (more blue) light, and frankly i do too, so a Life-Glo 2 combined with a tube higher in blue can work well. I had this for a couple years, but haven't been able to replace the "cooler" tubes locally. But the photos of my 90g and 115g tanks show this combo.

Hope that helps.

Byron.

Last edited by Byron; 02-24-2011 at 03:32 PM..
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2011, 03:54 PM   #14
 
Inga's Avatar
 
Alright, I am reading this and just want to be clear. The lifeglow 2 is has more of a blue/white light? I have to admit, I like that look better. It is easier on my old eyes then the yellowish tones. I THINK this is what I have on my 25 gallon Aqueon tank. There are 2 bulbs, one is blue/purple and the other white. The light is nicer over that tank then my stock 60 gallon.
Inga is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2011, 05:21 PM   #15
 
Boredomb's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
You can save yourself some money by deciding about light and nutrients first. Not all plants--just as not all fish--need the same light and nutrients, and selecting high light/high nutrient plants if your light is low/moderate will lead to failure within weeks. And that is discouraging.

On the substrate, I seriously would not recommend soil if this is your first attempt at a planted tank. Regular small-grain gravel will be much easier, I assure you. Or if you can afford it, one of the plant substrates like Seachem's Flourite or CarribSea's Eco-complete. These are much less risky than soil.

But to the light, what fixture/type of light do you have? Be specific. This is the single most important aspect of planted tanks.

Byron.
Okay soo with your help on the lighting I am going to go get a dual T8 48" fixture (which by the way Thanks!!!) what about the nutrients for the plants? I have read about this for the past week or so now But Ones experience first hand probably is a better source then just reading about it.
Boredomb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2011, 06:19 PM   #16
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boredomb View Post
Okay soo with your help on the lighting I am going to go get a dual T8 48" fixture (which by the way Thanks!!!) what about the nutrients for the plants? I have read about this for the past week or so now But Ones experience first hand probably is a better source then just reading about it.
Plants require 17 nutrients to grow, and in a low-tech or natural aquarium the easiest way of providing these is a comprehensive liquid fertilizer. I use and highly recommend Seachem's Flourish Comprehensive Supplement. It has all nutrients (except oxygen, carbon and hydrogen which occur naturally in the aquarium). While it may seem more expensive to buy, you use considerably less of this than any of the other preparations, so long-term it is more economical. For a 55g tank, 1 teaspoon once, maybe twice, a week is it. [I say maybe twice because it depends upon the plants (some need more nutrients than others), the fish load (which provide organics and CO2), the bacteria (CO2 again and they convert waste into organics), and the light intensity and duration.]

Seachem products are carried in many fish stores. Make sure it is Flourish Comprehensive, as they make several different products under the "Flourish" name.

Byron.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2011, 06:22 PM   #17
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inga View Post
Alright, I am reading this and just want to be clear. The lifeglow 2 is has more of a blue/white light? I have to admit, I like that look better. It is easier on my old eyes then the yellowish tones. I THINK this is what I have on my 25 gallon Aqueon tank. There are 2 bulbs, one is blue/purple and the other white. The light is nicer over that tank then my stock 60 gallon.
Yes, the Life-Glo 2 [or regular Life-Glo] is more of a cool white than even the "daylight" tubes. By contrast, their Sun-Glo has more red, so it is warmer, more of what you're thinking of yellowish.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2011, 06:33 PM   #18
 
Inga's Avatar
 
I see. I have the Life Glo but not the Life Glo 2. I would like to increase the light on the larger tank some. That or change tanks as I think this one is rather limited.
Inga is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2011, 06:40 PM   #19
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inga View Post
I see. I have the Life Glo but not the Life Glo 2. I would like to increase the light on the larger tank some. That or change tanks as I think this one is rather limited.
Which is which? The Life-Glo without the "2" is slightly more intense (brighter) than the Life-Glo 2. But they are the same type of lioght, full spectrum, slightly cool, 6700K. I use the Life-Glo 2 on my dual-tube tanks, with another type, because with two tubes i get sufficient light. I have the Life-Glo for the single tube 33g, though at present I've got a Life-Glo 2 on it to reduce the light a bit, due to the aquascape [that's the SE Asian pond tank].

If you have the Life-Glo on the larger tank and it is a single tube fixture, you won't get anyting more intense without going to a dual tube, or switching to single tube T5. I had a single T8 over my 55g years ago, it was quite adequate. That planted tank always won First in the Aquarium Society shows.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2011, 07:26 PM   #20
 
Boredomb's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
Plants require 17 nutrients to grow, and in a low-tech or natural aquarium the easiest way of providing these is a comprehensive liquid fertilizer. I use and highly recommend Seachem's Flourish Comprehensive Supplement. It has all nutrients (except oxygen, carbon and hydrogen which occur naturally in the aquarium). While it may seem more expensive to buy, you use considerably less of this than any of the other preparations, so long-term it is more economical. For a 55g tank, 1 teaspoon once, maybe twice, a week is it. [I say maybe twice because it depends upon the plants (some need more nutrients than others), the fish load (which provide organics and CO2), the bacteria (CO2 again and they convert waste into organics), and the light intensity and duration.]

Seachem products are carried in many fish stores. Make sure it is Flourish Comprehensive, as they make several different products under the "Flourish" name.

Byron.
Okay is this supplement in your opinion always needed? or does it depend on the substrate? Which leads to another question? ( and I hope I am not bugging with all these question? I just like to get as much understand and info on something before doing it rather then just jumping right in and getting over my head) On the substrates If I just use gravel I would obvisously have to use this supplement for the plants to flouish but if I use Seachem's Flourite or CarribSea's Eco-complete as u stated early on in the thread would I still need this supplement or would the plants get enough of the nutreints they need from that substrate alone?
Boredomb is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Help choosing plants for South American Biotope redchigh Beginner Planted Aquarium 13 05-21-2010 08:14 PM
Help choosing plants for my 10gal, to later use as plant filters. redchigh Beginner Planted Aquarium 10 01-21-2010 01:28 PM
Help on choosing coral killjoy391 Coral and Reef Creatures 11 06-17-2007 09:29 PM
need help choosing a scavenger miagrrl Freshwater and Tropical Fish 14 06-13-2007 11:23 PM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:34 AM.