My First Planted Tank
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My First Planted Tank

This is a discussion on My First Planted Tank within the Beginner Planted Aquarium forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> This is my 55 gallon tank. It houses one senegal bichir and a few Platies and 2 cory cats (all the small fish are ...

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My First Planted Tank
Old 01-08-2011, 08:44 PM   #1
 
My First Planted Tank

This is my 55 gallon tank. It houses one senegal bichir and a few Platies and 2 cory cats (all the small fish are only being housed here due to an emergency).

The plants are Java Fern, Wendtii Crypt, a dwarf anubia, another anubia of some sort, Hygrophila corymbosa, and a drawf tiger lily. This photo was taken yesterday but the lily seems to have grown a shoot about 7 inches tall that seems to be trying to reach up to the top of the tank.

I would love any and all suggestions on what I can do to to improve my tanks.

Any suggests on a color for tank my background? I was thinking that it might be cool to make it black as it would make the plants pop.

Oh, and I am waiting for the wood at the top to sink just so you know what is up with that.
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Old 01-08-2011, 09:21 PM   #2
 
forgot the photos!
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Old 01-08-2011, 09:24 PM   #3
 
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Nice. I'm a HUGE fan of black backgrounds (all my tanks have them) and I like the river stones you placed in the sand. Sweet. You are going to love the Red Tiger Lotus, it looks fantastic as it starts to really bunch up.
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Old 01-08-2011, 10:43 PM   #4
 
Thanks for the feedback. Do you think that the hygrophila Kompact will eventually propagate across the front substrate? I was told that it makes a good foreground plant when I bought it. However, now that it has arrived I have my doubts...
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Old 01-09-2011, 02:32 PM   #5
 
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Agree on the black background, plain, nothing shiny. And I also like the aquascape, that is quite natural.

I'm not familiar with Hygrophila kompact, which plant is this? I suspect it is a cultivar, with "kompact" in the name it sounds like a German or Dutch cultivar, but it would have been cultivated from one of the natural species.

Byron.
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Old 01-09-2011, 02:46 PM   #6
 
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Agree on the black background, plain, nothing shiny. And I also like the aquascape, that is quite natural.

I'm not familiar with Hygrophila kompact, which plant is this? I suspect it is a cultivar, with "kompact" in the name it sounds like a German or Dutch cultivar, but it would have been cultivated from one of the natural species.

Byron.

Here is a closer photo of the Hygro...I apologize for the quality I would take a better one but left my camera at work yesterday.
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Old 01-09-2011, 03:29 PM   #7
 
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There are a few species that have leaves similar to those; Hygrophila corymbosa is a common species and comes in several varieties, so at a guess it may be this one that has been cultiovated as a compact plant.

All hygrophila are stem plants, which means they grow stems that will send out side shoots but not runners in the substrate to produce a thicket of plants. You would need to cut off the stem tips and plant them to expand the plant across the substrate.

Byron.
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Old 01-09-2011, 03:43 PM   #8
 
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All hygrophila are stem plants, which means they grow stems that will send out side shoots but not runners in the substrate to produce a thicket of plants. You would need to cut off the stem tips and plant them to expand the plant across the substrate.

Byron.
I do not mean to sound like an idiot but here it goes...

What part of the plant is the stem tip exactly?
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Old 01-09-2011, 03:59 PM   #9
 
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Stem plants grow individually as a long stem from which the leaves arise. The growing end is the tip. As opposed to the cut end which is stuck in the substrate. Stem plants need regular pruning/trimming, or they will just keep growing and at the surface usually along it. Lower leaves tend to die off when they reach the surface.

That is for normal stem plants. I mentioned earlier I was unfamiliar with this particular plant, so I did some checking online and came up with this brief description; as I suspected though, it was developed from H. corymbosa, so at least I was on the right track.
Hygrophila corymbosa 'Kompakt' is a great aquarium plant selection. It is a low growing form of Hygrophila corymbosa that has reddish newer leaves under bright light. It also is a very dense growing plant that forms sideshoots readily to make an attractive cluster. This is a great plant best suited for the foreground or midground areas of a planted aquarium.
I've never had (or seen) this plant, so can't add much. Given this description though, you may not have to do any pruning to make it spread. On another site I found, it mentions that it can attain up to 10 inches in height.

Byron.
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Old 01-09-2011, 04:10 PM   #10
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
Stem plants grow individually as a long stem from which the leaves arise. The growing end is the tip. As opposed to the cut end which is stuck in the substrate. Stem plants need regular pruning/trimming, or they will just keep growing and at the surface usually along it. Lower leaves tend to die off when they reach the surface.

That is for normal stem plants. I mentioned earlier I was unfamiliar with this particular plant, so I did some checking online and came up with this brief description; as I suspected though, it was developed from H. corymbosa, so at least I was on the right track.
Hygrophila corymbosa 'Kompakt' is a great aquarium plant selection. It is a low growing form of Hygrophila corymbosa that has reddish newer leaves under bright light. It also is a very dense growing plant that forms sideshoots readily to make an attractive cluster. This is a great plant best suited for the foreground or midground areas of a planted aquarium.
I've never had (or seen) this plant, so can't add much. Given this description though, you may not have to do any pruning to make it spread. On another site I found, it mentions that it can attain up to 10 inches in height.


Byron.
Thank you so much. I think I will just keep this plant where it is and see how it decides to grow in my tank. In the mean time I will simply order some marsala minuta for the carpet. I think it should do well there
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