more light more algae?
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more light more algae?

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more light more algae?
Old 11-11-2010, 07:55 PM   #1
 
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more light more algae?

I have a 10 gallon aquarium (see my aquarium Royal) and i started leaving the lights on longer (about 10 hours) as compared to 8 hours. now im noticing these small hard green looking disc on the sides of the aquarium. THey are somewhat hard to scrape off. Could it be the extra time the lights are on?

also, i added some new plants about a week ago
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Old 11-12-2010, 03:07 PM   #2
 
Green Spot Algae, i have it too, never goes away, at least for me. You just gotta scrape em off every once in a while. I think the only algae eater that cane at em are plecos, ive never seen anything else eat em.

Try the light, since ive cut my lights back my algae growth has slowed but it's still around.
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Old 11-12-2010, 05:06 PM   #3
 
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More plants less algae!! Find the balance. It takes time but its worth the effort.
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Old 11-12-2010, 06:45 PM   #4
 
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i bought a wholoe bunch of plants for the tank. Maybe the algae came with it. Im just waiting for the plants to fill out then maybe the algae will be at bay. I will also cut back the lights.
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Old 11-13-2010, 06:49 PM   #5
 
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I haven't found green spot/dot algae to be as problematic as other algae. If you clean the inside glass every week during the partial water change it will generally keep it from forming. I use one of those sponge scrapers on a stick, on the front glass every week even though I may not see anything; if I forget, I usually notice a spot of two of this algae by the next week.

Previous members' comments on light and plants are very true. Once the balance between light, nutrients and the number of plants is reached, algae will probably be present but within reason. Having said that, I do find that it will suddenly increase usually once or maybe twice a year. I suspect this is something akin to the plants regular annual periods of growth and periods of rest. Algae is a plant after all.
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Old 11-13-2010, 11:23 PM   #6
 
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hmm, so your saying i need to find proper balance in the force...er aquarium?
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Old 11-14-2010, 11:58 AM   #7
 
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Originally Posted by Blaxicanlatino View Post
hmm, so your saying i need to find proper balance in the force...er aquarium?
Remember that algae is perfectly natural and will appear in any aquarium. Those photos you may see of apparently "algae-less" tanks are a figment; someone spends hours cleaning the tanks to take such photos. The aim though is to have the algae minimal, or at least not overwhelming. And there are various types of algae, and this one or that one will appear in one tank but not in another, even under near-identical situations with respect to water, light, fertilizers, fish load, etc. All these are normally held in check by having a balance between plant load, light, and nutrients, and nutrients includes added fertilizer plus the nutrients naturally occurring from the fish load and organics.

Finding the "balance" at which plants grow well and algae remains under control naturally is not always quick. As a tank matures the biology settles differently, and sometimes light has to be adjusted during this process; assuming the intensity is minimal to start with, duration can be adjusted along the way to achieve this. It is only when the light is greater than what the plants can use in balance with the nutrients that algae becomes a menace. If you have read my articles you will remember I speak about the Law of Minimum--plants will grow up to the point at which something is no longer sufficient, and this limiting factor should always be the light. If it is a nutrient, say CO2, nitrogen, or minerals, and light continues, algae takes advantage.

And obviously the more plants, the more they use the available light, so a well-planted tank with minimal but sufficient light and sufficient nutrients to balance will be relatively free of algae. But having said this, algae like plants have growth spurts, or more accurately periods of growth and periods of relative rest. Which is why I find this or that type of algae may increase suddenly in one aquarium, even though nothing has changed. But there are also changes that are obvious, like longer and brighter daylight during summer--this will affect algae unless your tanks are in a completely-daylight-free room. Blinds on the windows still allow light to enter, and in summer it will be brighter and last longer.

Byron.
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Old 11-15-2010, 01:26 PM   #8
 
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Remember that algae is perfectly natural and will appear in any aquarium. Those photos you may see of apparently "algae-less" tanks are a figment; someone spends hours cleaning the tanks to take such photos. The aim though is to have the algae minimal, or at least not overwhelming. And there are various types of algae, and this one or that one will appear in one tank but not in another, even under near-identical situations with respect to water, light, fertilizers, fish load, etc. All these are normally held in check by having a balance between plant load, light, and nutrients, and nutrients includes added fertilizer plus the nutrients naturally occurring from the fish load and organics.

Finding the "balance" at which plants grow well and algae remains under control naturally is not always quick. As a tank matures the biology settles differently, and sometimes light has to be adjusted during this process; assuming the intensity is minimal to start with, duration can be adjusted along the way to achieve this. It is only when the light is greater than what the plants can use in balance with the nutrients that algae becomes a menace. If you have read my articles you will remember I speak about the Law of Minimum--plants will grow up to the point at which something is no longer sufficient, and this limiting factor should always be the light. If it is a nutrient, say CO2, nitrogen, or minerals, and light continues, algae takes advantage.

And obviously the more plants, the more they use the available light, so a well-planted tank with minimal but sufficient light and sufficient nutrients to balance will be relatively free of algae. But having said this, algae like plants have growth spurts, or more accurately periods of growth and periods of relative rest. Which is why I find this or that type of algae may increase suddenly in one aquarium, even though nothing has changed. But there are also changes that are obvious, like longer and brighter daylight during summer--this will affect algae unless your tanks are in a completely-daylight-free room. Blinds on the windows still allow light to enter, and in summer it will be brighter and last longer.

Byron.


hmm interesting. I analyzed any changes i made to my tank along with outside changes, the tank as been slightly colder due to it becoming winter around here, so the tank is from 78 degrees F to about 73. also ive been leaving the lights on longer. guess i just need to play around with it more :D. ive always had a light green dust algae in the tank walls but this is the first time that ive had to deal with green spot algae in this tank.
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Old 11-15-2010, 01:58 PM   #9
 
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hmm interesting. I analyzed any changes i made to my tank along with outside changes, the tank as been slightly colder due to it becoming winter around here, so the tank is from 78 degrees F to about 73. also ive been leaving the lights on longer. guess i just need to play around with it more :D. ive always had a light green dust algae in the tank walls but this is the first time that ive had to deal with green spot algae in this tank.
As I think I mentioned, I never fuss over green dot/spot algae. Cleaning the glass weekly keeps it away unless I neglect this, but then I just get the scraper and remove it. But I never see more than a very few spots--are you saying you have it everywhere?

It is the other algae I worry about, like brush algae, hair algae--these are far more difficult to control once they increase, and they seem to do this once or twice a year, rather co-incidental with the slower plant growth. In any case, if you are having normal algae issues, increasing the light is only going to make it worse.

I have a 10-hour light period now, I reduced it recently from 11 hours as brush algae was increasing in two tanks. I read an article in Practical Fishkeeping the other day about 8 hours being sufficient light to control algae. If my ten doesn't do it, I will reduce further. There is a close relationship here with carbon especially. CO2 is naturally more prevalent in the morning, so when the lights come on plants have sufficient carbon to balance. As the day continues, CO2 becomes less and less; some say after 5 hours it is practically non-existant except as produced each second by fish and bacteria of course, and it is at this point that plants begin to slow down [that law of minimum]; but the light continues so algae has the advantage. The siesta approach uses this principal; some think it is the break in light mid-day that works to prevent algae, but actually it is the replenishment of CO2 during the siesta period that does the work; when the lights come back on, CO2 is again in excess and the plants use it. Algae loses out, all else being balanced. I have not gone to the siesta method yet, as I am concerned over the effect on the fish of two "day/night" periods within each full day. As this is certainly un-natural, I prefer to try other methods such as simply reducing the light period. Of course, the more intense the light the worse this will be; which is why I advocate the absolute minimum intensity of light--plants use less CO2 and nutrients than when the light is brighter. That balance thing again.

Byron.
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