Lilaeopsis Brasiliensis (Micro Sword)?
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Lilaeopsis Brasiliensis (Micro Sword)?

This is a discussion on Lilaeopsis Brasiliensis (Micro Sword)? within the Beginner Planted Aquarium forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> I know it prefers rich substrate and Bright light, But, Can this plant survive in Low light (1.5 wpg), with no Co2?...

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Lilaeopsis Brasiliensis (Micro Sword)?
Old 05-26-2011, 06:50 PM   #1
 
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Lilaeopsis Brasiliensis (Micro Sword)?

I know it prefers rich substrate and Bright light, But, Can this plant survive in Low light (1.5 wpg), with no Co2?
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Old 05-26-2011, 07:09 PM   #2
 
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First off, watts per gallon is only relatively useful with T8 full spectrum/daylight tubes over average-sized tanks. T5 HO lighting is a very different story, and incandescent CF bulbs are different again. Also, terms like low light and moderate light plants are very subjective. I used these terms in our plant profiles as a guide, but you will not find complete agreement from planted tank authors on their meaning, or on which plants fall under the specific term.

I have less than 1 wpg on all my "average" tanks with fluorescent T8 tubes and I consider this moderate light. And this is adequate for Lilaeopsis brasiliensis. This is a slow growing plant even under bright light/CO2, so don't expect fast growth.

Byron.
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Old 05-26-2011, 07:24 PM   #3
 
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Originally Posted by Byron View Post
First off, watts per gallon is only relatively useful with T8 full spectrum/daylight tubes over average-sized tanks. T5 HO lighting is a very different story, and incandescent CF bulbs are different again. Also, terms like low light and moderate light plants are very subjective. I used these terms in our plant profiles as a guide, but you will not find complete agreement from planted tank authors on their meaning, or on which plants fall under the specific term.

I have less than 1 wpg on all my "average" tanks with fluorescent T8 tubes and I consider this moderate light. And this is adequate for Lilaeopsis brasiliensis. This is a slow growing plant even under bright light/CO2, so don't expect fast growth.

Byron.
The Life-Glo is a T8 Full Spectrum daylight tube. Not sure what you mean by "average" tank?

1 WPG is pretty low Bryon, how do you consider that Moderate light? That's more in the low's if you asked me.
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Old 05-26-2011, 07:57 PM   #4
 
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Originally Posted by Big Fate View Post
The Life-Glo is a T8 Full Spectrum daylight tube. Not sure what you mean by "average" tank?

1 WPG is pretty low Bryon, how do you consider that Moderate light? That's more in the low's if you asked me.
"Average" as in size, the wpg "guide" is less reliable with small tanks and very large tanks. I use fluorescent tubes on my 29g, 33g, 70g, 90g and 115g and all work out to under 1 wpg [except the 70g which is 80w over a 70g]. I use Life-Glo tubes and Phillips Daylight Deluxe, T8. As one example of unreliable "watts" consideration, the Life-Glo is 40w; I could use ZooMed Ultra Sun tubes which are only 32w but deliver the same intensity as the Life-Glo 40w. Watts is not reliable, only a guide, sometimes.

I said there is not agreement on these terms. There are still many authors who write that you cannot have successful plant growth with less than 2-3 wpg. That is nonsense. I've been doing this for more than 20 years, and the photos of my tanks are proof that this does work. One simply has to balance it. I still get algae, and that means too much light, so I reduce the light period to restore the balance. And when you add to the equation that one tube of 32w and another make of 40w produce the same intensity of light, this wpg things flies out the window anyway.

I can grow low and moderate light plants well. Echinodorus species are all deemed moderate to bright by most authors, and I have no problem at all growing these; they send out runners and inflorescences regularly, I am throwing out plants all the time onto the compost. If moderate-light plants grow so well under my light, I must have moderate light.

Over my 115g tank, if i were to attempt 2 watts per gallon, I would need more than 7 48-inch tubes using the ZooMed 32w tubes. That is simply ludicrous. I only have two tubes now, and it is bright (to me and the fish).
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Old 05-26-2011, 08:34 PM   #5
 
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Yea, hard to argue with that seeing that you have the living proof right before us :)

So what you're saying is my Micro Sword should do fine?

My substrate is nothing more than sand, I lowered the outflow to my filter and removed the 2nd one and airstone.
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Old 05-27-2011, 09:38 AM   #6
 
mine grows under low spectrum LED lights and diffused natural light. Its a very slow growing plant so dont expect it to carpet for a long time. Its very hardy though, so you dont really have to worry about light as much.
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Old 05-27-2011, 12:30 PM   #7
 
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mine grows under low spectrum LED lights and diffused natural light. Its a very slow growing plant so dont expect it to carpet for a long time. Its very hardy though, so you dont really have to worry about light as much.
yea i'm not worried about it growing slow... I just wanna make sure it can survive in my tank before I unpot it... I heard its best to spread it in small batches. That true?

Also how could you anchor a small bunched plant like that? The sand is such a fine substrate that plants easily get unrooted in my tank..
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Old 05-27-2011, 01:12 PM   #8
 
For me, in one tank, my older one, i planted and then replanted everytime it came up. For my betta tank, i have the plant separated into long strands with one end deeply planted and the other end at the surface. The surface ones eventualyl grew roots deep enough to anchor it and the deeply buried part rotted and died. But at least now my plant is anchored... My 1g has it planted where the rhizome is weighed down by larger heavier gravel but it was a pain in the behind to set up, had to put down each gravel on its own to weight the plant down.
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Old 05-27-2011, 01:53 PM   #9
 
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S-L-O-W growth is the operative word. If the light's too bright and planting too dense without CO2, you'll get an (algae?) coating on the microswords. They grow fine in shady areas of my tank, getting taller there than the more brightly-lit areas.

My tank: 55 gallon, one T5HO plant tube @ 7hrs/day, Flourish comprehensive 2x/week, Excel dosing daily.
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Old 05-27-2011, 03:33 PM   #10
 
i grow some in a jar emersed and its slow there too, been over a couple months and still hasnt carpeted the entire jar and its only 3 inches in diameter. No CO2 restriction, direct light, soil substrate. Same growth speeds as anubias plants.
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