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Lighting needed for 10 gallon planted tank?

This is a discussion on Lighting needed for 10 gallon planted tank? within the Beginner Planted Aquarium forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> Alright I will take a look for sure then. I can always do some diy cover for the lights if needed....

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Lighting needed for 10 gallon planted tank?
Old 07-22-2011, 02:36 PM   #11
 
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Alright I will take a look for sure then. I can always do some diy cover for the lights if needed.
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Old 07-23-2011, 12:40 AM   #12
 
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Well I picked up the 10w flourescent spiral lights.

Instead of doing the soil bottom I am thinking about doing black sand with a thin layer of gravel, would this be okay for planting?
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Old 07-23-2011, 09:05 AM   #13
 
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Originally Posted by Cassandra90 View Post
Well I picked up the 10w flourescent spiral lights.

Instead of doing the soil bottom I am thinking about doing black sand with a thin layer of gravel, would this be okay for planting?
Yers, but I would stick with just the sand. Sand/gravel of different grain sizes will mix naturally; if they are not the same colour, it will be very obvious. I find it is preferable to have one substrate material/type/size in a tank. There are several small substrate fish and shrimp suitable to a planted 10g and sand works well for these too.
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Old 07-23-2011, 11:50 AM   #14
 
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The gravel I have now is black, but I will try just with the black sand.

Can I change the substrate all in one day? Or does it take longer. I know I have to wash the sand first. But if I put it in the tank and added old tank water back and new water would it be safe to add the fish back in that day?

Also, would you have any suggestions on plants? I have an aquarium store near me that pretty much carries all types of freshwater plants.
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Old 07-23-2011, 12:12 PM   #15
 
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The gravel I have now is black, but I will try just with the black sand.

Can I change the substrate all in one day? Or does it take longer. I know I have to wash the sand first. But if I put it in the tank and added old tank water back and new water would it be safe to add the fish back in that day?

Also, would you have any suggestions on plants? I have an aquarium store near me that pretty much carries all types of freshwater plants.
With a small tank such as this 10g, you could change the substrate with the fish in the tank. I personally prefer to remove the fish, in this case to a 2g bucket (or a spare small tank if you have one) and keep the filter running in the bucket/tank [just hang it in somehow]. This allows you to drain the tank and remove all the substrate. Then add the well-washed sand [rinse and rinse and rinse]. Add live plants, and any decor [keeping decor from the existing tank in the tank water in the bucket or another bucket will preserve bacteria on it, don't wash or rinse it]. Fill with dechlorinated fresh water. If the fresh water differs from the existing tank water, acclimate the fish by mixing the waters slowly/gradually. Then net the fish into the tank. In this case, as it is your tank, you could "pour" the fish and bucket of water into the new tank half filled with dechlorinated fresh water. The live plants will assimilate the ammonia immediately, plus you have bacteria in the filter and on any decor. I have moved large tanks with more than a hundred fish in them to a new setup in one day, with new filter media and substrate. Live plants are miraculous.

Good plants for a 10g are pygmy chain sword, crypts (the smaller species, some are in our profiles), dwarf sword, and stem plants. Floating plants are always beneficial for fish, and Brazilian Pennywort is ideal floating, and Water Sprite if you can find it.
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Old 07-23-2011, 12:17 PM   #16
 
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Thank you.

I am for sure going to be working on this today. Thank you for the helpful information :)

I will be sure to post pictures when I am done.
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Old 07-23-2011, 12:33 PM   #17
 
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Some more ideas are 'Echinodorus var Klienar Prinz", "Echinodorus var Compacta", and Prosperinica Palustrus.

Crypt Wendtii are nice... They'll eventually outgrow the tank but they grow extremely slowly.
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Old 07-23-2011, 06:30 PM   #18
 
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Well I finally redid the tank.

I got black sand washed it for ever. (seemed like it).

Plants:
Pennywort
Hornwort
Watersprite
Pogostemon Helferi
Red Temple (not positive if correct name)
Sunset Hygrophila

I also bought Flourish by Seachems.
The owner of the aquarium store was mentioning about if I opt out of CO2 that there is a product called excell (not positive on the name either) that Seachem makes that will help with the plants. Have either of you heard of this product?
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Old 07-23-2011, 07:25 PM   #19
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cassandra90 View Post
Well I finally redid the tank.

I got black sand washed it for ever. (seemed like it).

Plants:
Pennywort
Hornwort
Watersprite
Pogostemon Helferi
Red Temple (not positive if correct name)
Sunset Hygrophila

I also bought Flourish by Seachems.
The owner of the aquarium store was mentioning about if I opt out of CO2 that there is a product called excell (not positive on the name either) that Seachem makes that will help with the plants. Have either of you heard of this product?
We both kinow of it. I do not recommend it; redchigh can speak for himself. It is a liquid form of carbon, but some plants will melt away with it, and if the dose happens to increase beyond the minimum, it can affect fish. I believe someone in another thread mentioned harm to people, can't remember exactly what it was. I do not recommend it for these reasons, but also if it is used it sets up a new (higher) level of balance. I prefer minimal, so nature does most of the work rather than the aquarist adding chemicals and substances. The Flourish Comprehensive is a very different matter, that is simply natural plant nutrients in a chelated form that plants can use, and each nutrient is in proportion to each other so it is balanced. In your 10g, about 1/3 teaspoon, once a week will be sufficient.
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Old 07-23-2011, 07:40 PM   #20
 
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I will stick with using the nutrient additive only.

I use it in my 55 gallon without CO2 and I never had a problem with the plants.

The only plant I am not sure on care for is the Pogostemon Helferi, I looked up some info and it seems it should be not to hard to care for. I figured I will keep a look on it just to make sure.
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