LIght Hours? Will it affect plants... - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
 
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post #1 of 6 Old 12-02-2010, 03:23 PM Thread Starter
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LIght Hours? Will it affect plants...

I have a quick question..
I have a heavily planted 100l tank... And i was wondering about how much the lights should be on..
I usually turn them on at 8am in the morning and turn them off at 7:30 pm..
But i am usually in my room most of the evening so i do not see the fish..And the tank is ot in the day while i am at school...
So could i maybe turn them on at 3pm and turn off at 10pm so they will be on for 7 hours\?
Or should i turn them on at 7am and off at 9pm?? 13 hours??
Or i can just keep them on the 11 hours there on but i just dont see them much...
Thanks

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post #2 of 6 Old 12-03-2010, 01:28 AM
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Since you have a planted tank you will want your lights on for at least 8-10 hours. As for what time...whatever is convenient for you as far as viewing time. Mine come on about 2pm and go off at 10pm since that is when I am usually home from work and I can enjoy the tank into the evening hours. Mine are on timers so there is consistency for the fish (and plants of course).

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post #3 of 6 Old 12-03-2010, 08:13 AM
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What kind of lighting do you have? Some lighting is not suitable for being left on for that length of time every day. Is your aquarium water tempreture the same or just a tad bit more when the light is on in the evening, or is it 3 or 4 degrees over what it should be?

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post #4 of 6 Old 12-03-2010, 10:42 AM Thread Starter
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Not sure...... But the temp on the heater is set a 25 degrees and it stay between 25-26 degrees..

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11 Neon Tetras
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Opaline Gourami
BN Pleco
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CoCo: Rat

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post #5 of 6 Old 12-03-2010, 01:27 PM
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I'll just expand a bit on the advice (correct) already mentioned.

Plants need a sufficient period to photosynthesize (which is how they grow/live). Nutrients must be in balance, or the plants cannot use the light. That is when algae takes advantage of the "excess" light. So we aim to ensure there is a balance during the period the light is on. This period can vary from as little as 6 hours to as much as 15 hours. Provided the plants (and fish) have a sizable period of total and complete darkness, usually 10 hours is recommended, they will manage with the period of light whatever it may be--but provided the nutrients are sufficient to balance the light period.

When these periods of light and dark occur is of no consequence to either the plants or the fish. But the point made by jeaninel is important--consistency. Plants and fish will be better with a regular stable schedule. My tank lights are now on for 10 hours daily. Years ago it was 15 hours. I am currently at 10 hours because any more and brush algae increases. And one must remember that light in the room, whether daylight through the windows or artificial room lights, also contributes. The "dark" period should be absolute darkness; for most of us this is late night to early morning.

Having your lights come on mid day and going off in the evening so you can be home to view the tank is fine. Using a timer is the best way to achieve regularity. When you feed the fish also has to be within the period of light. When I worked and left home around 7 am before it was light outside (in the winter), I fed the fish when I came home in the evening around 6 pm. They got used to that schedule, expecting food every evening but never during the day. You want to feed them when the light is on, and after it has been on for at least 20 minutes so they are accustomed to the light, and not later than an hour before the light goes out.

As for the length of time, that depends upon your aquarium: the biological balance is different in each aquarium, so sometimes it takes a bit of experimenting to find the right period. I usually start out at 10-12 hours, and as the tank becomes established over the first few months, I monitor plant growth and algae. Remembering that algae frequently appears during the first couple of months as the water is still adjusting biologically, so this is normal. But once the tank has been running for 5-6 months, any increase in algae means there is too much light. Assuming the intensity is adequate, the duration can be shortened by an hour. Then if this is insufficient, another hour. In summer with longer days and brighter daylight, algae can appear more, so perhaps less light in summer (an hour less). It depends upon the algae.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #6 of 6 Old 12-03-2010, 02:14 PM Thread Starter
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thank you very much byron for another very full and well wrote answer!!!

26 Gallon Community:
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4 Mollies

3 Guppys

1 Swordtail
11 Neon Tetras
1 Red Tailed Shark
Opaline Gourami
BN Pleco
Snakes-
Coral: Rat X Corn
CoCo: Rat

R.I.P Saphire You'll always be in my heart






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