I think my plants are all dying.
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I think my plants are all dying.

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I think my plants are all dying.
Old 07-17-2010, 04:40 PM   #1
 
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I think my plants are all dying.

Well I got all my new plants in on Thursday, gave them some fertilizer and the new lights on Friday but they are not looking good at all. I would say that I am down by 1/3 of them already as I have had to throw so much out. My Amazon Sword and Camboba which have been in a few extra weeks are getting brown now too.

I understand that the new ones are stressed from the move and temperature changes and everything but I was hopeful that they could bounce back. Any suggestions as to what to do?

I had to do a partial water change again today because my favorite fish "little Blue" was dead when I came home today. I didn't want to leave toxins in the water so I did a 25% change but as careful as I was taking out and putting in water, I think damaged the plants even more. A lot of the dead pieces fell off from the water movement and are now floating about. Is there any hope for them?
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Old 07-17-2010, 05:06 PM   #2
 
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Fist thing Inga, three days is not sufficient for plants. I reset my 70g two weeks ago, and added plants on the Tuesday [12 days ago now]. Some were crypts. On Friday one of the crypts had melted; the other of the same species only did so (partially) this past Wednesday. I fully suspected this, crypts usually do melt when moved. My point is that it takes several days sometimes for adjustments. As for the other plants, they are no different yet.

Your plants had the added stress of being mailed (I bought mine in stores) and that takes its toll. Be patient.

As for the sword, how long have you had it? And was it from the store new, or elsewhere?
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Old 07-17-2010, 05:09 PM   #3
 
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I figured I had better add a few pictures so you guys might better be able to tell what is going on.

Here is the Amazon Sword. It went through a yellowing stage but it had gotten greener and seemed to be doing well. Now it has big brown patches on it. I don't think it is algae as my algae eaters (otto's) tend to ignore those spots when they are cleaning the leaves.


The Pennywort seems to be almost melting. The leaves and even some of the stem is getting sort of soft and clear. It is almost impossible to pick out the leaves that come off because they just squish in my hands and break into tiny little fragments in the water. It doesn't' show well on here but it almost looks white in spots then they get soft and fall off.

Pennywort from the top


The Java Fern

self explanatory as to what is going on here.

Rotala is kind of like the Pennywort, it gets soft and squishy, though not nearly as bad yet. Some areas are getting real yellow in color.


Here is the Ludwigiaas you can see, it is flipped over and looking worn out.


The Vallis has all but disappeared and the Hydrophilia and Narrow leaf is yellow, soft and sort of withered looking.

I am still hopeful these plants can sort of bounce back. I don't know what else I can do for them.
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Old 07-17-2010, 05:12 PM   #4
 
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Oh yeah, I figured the stress was the issue but I was concerned that the damage would be so sever, they wouldn't bounce back. It sounds hopeful that they might then, even if they are melted.

I bought the 2 Amazon Swords and the Cabomba at Petsmart.
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Old 07-17-2010, 05:29 PM   #5
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That Java Fern looks fine. Mine seem to do that all the time, especially after I tie them on. After a few weeks, I bet you'll start seeing tiny fronds start appearing and "rolling out."

By the way, may I suggest fishing line or brown cotton string to tie those on with? It's much more aesthetically pleasing. :)
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Old 07-17-2010, 05:36 PM   #6
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kro View Post
That Java Fern looks fine. Mine seem to do that all the time, especially after I tie them on. After a few weeks, I bet you'll start seeing tiny fronds start appearing and "rolling out."

By the way, may I suggest fishing line or brown cotton string to tie those on with? It's much more aesthetically pleasing. :)

LOL Yeah, I stupidly thought it would blend better then fishing line. I also thought I would be able to take it off after the fern was "stuck on" so I thought it would be easier for me to get to. I might change it but honestly, I am afraid to touch anything right now, It is all so fragile and falling apart. I was afraid I was losing everything because it all looks pretty rough.
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Old 07-17-2010, 05:38 PM   #7
 
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From the photos, I agree the Rotala and Ludwigia don't look good, but these are stem plants that are fast growers and undoubtedly this ordeal has taken a toll. Give them some time in their new home, with good light and nutrients, and they should bounce back.

The Java Fern doesn't like bright light, so it does best in shadier spots, if there are floating plants over it it will be fine. It is a fairly slow grower, so don't expect a lot in a few weeks ever. I have two attached to wood that I got almost a year ago, and they have not grown much in all that time.

Echinodorus (swords) are mainly amphibious bog plants, spending half the year emersed in marsh/bog soils and the other half submersed (the rainy/flood season). All adapt very well, some extremely well, to fully submersed conditions which is why they make excellent aquarium plants. But the leaves the plant produces when emersed are quite different from those when submersed. The outer leaves that are yellowing is probably the emersed growth, and now that the plant is submersed these leaves will all in time yellow and die; remove them once they begin to yellow, pull them off right at the base at the crown. I use my fingers to bend the leaf back and down, and the stem usuaslly breaks apart fairly easily.

However, I do see the "clear" patches on several of the plants, and that is a nutrient issue. But I need to know more; what is your pH and hardness, and temperature? Are you using a liquid fertilizer and which one and how often? How long is the tank light on daily?

Byron.
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Old 07-17-2010, 06:29 PM   #8
 
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Ok, The PH level is 7.6, I don't know the exact hardness but I have soft water. (without a softener) The lights are on for about 12 hours a day, I just added Root Tabs (API brand) and Flourish Comprehensive. It said to do that 2 times a week, which I intended to do.
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Old 07-17-2010, 09:29 PM   #9
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Inga View Post
Ok, The PH level is 7.6, I don't know the exact hardness but I have soft water. (without a softener) The lights are on for about 12 hours a day, I just added Root Tabs (API brand) and Flourish Comprehensive. It said to do that 2 times a week, which I intended to do.
That sounds good, they should start to show improvement in a couple weeks.
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Old 07-17-2010, 09:57 PM   #10
 
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Inga, my gardening experience is terrestrial, I'm also new to aquarium plants. Byron or someone else who knows better than I do can correct me if there is a difference between terrestrial and aquatic plants and I'm completely wrong telling you this, but dead leaves don't necessarily mean your plant is dying. The plant grows, it disposes of waste materials into some leaves which die, but the plant still grows and is healthy. A growing plant won't look completely perfect like a plastic plant. Some leaves will die off as part of the normal plant processes. A plant that looks half dead can still be alive, it'll shed some leaves (sometimes, a lot of leaves) but it will then throw out some new growth and be perfectly ok. The hygrophilia I put in one of my tanks looked a bit sad when I put it in, some of the older leaves have done that dissolving thing, but there's new growth on it so I think it's ok (it's been several weeks and it's not dead). As Byron has said, be patient. Just leave it be for a while and you might be pleasantly surprised.

(oh, and I wouldn't overdo the fertilizer, either, especially while the plants are stressed. Time will fix things better than too much fertilizer will.)
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