How long does it take for anubias to grab on to rock...
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How long does it take for anubias to grab on to rock...

This is a discussion on How long does it take for anubias to grab on to rock... within the Beginner Planted Aquarium forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> I've had purchased several anubias about 6 weeks ago and tied them to rocks with rubberband. They don't look like they're attaching anytime soon. ...

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How long does it take for anubias to grab on to rock...
Old 03-31-2013, 11:08 PM   #1
 
How long does it take for anubias to grab on to rock...

I've had purchased several anubias about 6 weeks ago and tied them to rocks with rubberband. They don't look like they're attaching anytime soon. They all look healthy and a few new leaves have grown on a few of them, just wondering how long it takes for them to attach and if their is anything that could speed up the process, it's a 55g currently running 1 T8 bulb.
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Old 03-31-2013, 11:10 PM   #2
 
I have Anubis inside a piece of drift wood and they have been there for over six months now. They still have not attached to it. The plant is a slow rowing plants that requires some shade. It will take some time but ever aquarium is different.
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Old 03-31-2013, 11:15 PM   #3
 
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gunna have to say it would be hard to even come up with a ballpark on that, as sag said every system is diffrent and there are just too many growth determining factors give a figure. might be a few months for one person might be close to a year for another.
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Old 03-31-2013, 11:22 PM   #4
 
Cool, crazy that it can take that long. I just thought I was doing something wrong, guess not. Currently don't have any floating plants as I had a serious FAIL with duckweed and salvinia last week, I do have several bunches of pennywort coming Thursday to use as floaters.

Do anubias actually grow better/faster in shade?
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Old 03-31-2013, 11:23 PM   #5
 
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I've had them latch onto rocks or driftwood within days, and I've had others that took their time. Some of this was influenced by what I was trying to attach them to. If the rock has no or very little grain and a smooth surface, it will be more difficult for the plant to 'grip' onto it. If the stone is highly textured and/or porous, the roots will be able to attach much more easily and securely. . . I've found that they attach most quickly to driftwood. :)

With lighting, some of this depends on which type of Anubias you have, but in general - yes. This plant is generally slow growing, so you will want to keep it lightly shaded to ensure that those beautiful leaves will be protected from algae.

Last edited by Chesh; 03-31-2013 at 11:34 PM..
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Old 03-31-2013, 11:39 PM   #6
 
Cool, crazy that it can take that long. I just thought I was doing something wrong, guess not. Currently don't have any floating plants as I had a serious FAIL with duckweed and salvinia last week, I do have several bunches of pennywort coming Thursday to use as floaters.

Do anubias actually grow better/faster in shade?
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Old 03-31-2013, 11:42 PM   #7
 
Ok, so I have most of them on smooth stones , will they not latch on to these, and if so will this affect the plant long term.
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Old 04-01-2013, 12:41 AM   #8
 
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Originally Posted by smit3183 View Post
Ok, so I have most of them on smooth stones , will they not latch on to these, and if so will this affect the plant long term.
I'm not sure if they eventually will or not. I've never had the patience to wait it out to find out! There are many kinds of rock, so you'd really just have to try and see what happens in your situation.

All of mine are grown on rocks or wood, but I've read that they can live just fine unattached - or until they find something to attach themselves to - provided their rhizome is not buried. But again, I've never grown this plant in this way.
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Old 04-01-2013, 08:26 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by smit3183 View Post
Cool, crazy that it can take that long. I just thought I was doing something wrong, guess not. Currently don't have any floating plants as I had a serious FAIL with duckweed and salvinia last week, I do have several bunches of pennywort coming Thursday to use as floaters.

Do anubias actually grow better/faster in shade?
I don't know about anubias, haven't tried them and likely won't.

What the heck is a serious fail of duckweed? That baffles me as it must be the hardest plant to kill off.

Jeff.
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Old 04-01-2013, 08:55 AM   #10
 
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What the heck is a serious fail of duckweed? That baffles me as it must be the hardest plant to kill off.
HAHA! I have to admit, I was really curious, too, but didn't want to derail the thread! *giggle*
Why no Anubias? They're lovely things. . .
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