Flourish needed for Low light plants? - Page 3 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #21 of 53 Old 05-16-2011, 05:02 PM
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Also The Flourish liquid is a dark brown color right? For some reason mine was already opened.
That's a good question. I have had three jugs in the past 3 years, and different colours. I just opened a new one, it is amber, sot of pale tan. I remember seeing it very dark brown, I think from older jugs (one lasts me about a year). Keep it refrigerated once opened; not sure why but as Seachem suggests this i would do it.

If you bought this at the store and it was opened, i would take it back just in case; regardless of what they may say, tell them you know it was opened and may not be effective since Seachem says to keep it refrigerated once opened. It may make no difference, but might as well try.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #22 of 53 Old 05-16-2011, 06:41 PM Thread Starter
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That's a good question. I have had three jugs in the past 3 years, and different colours. I just opened a new one, it is amber, sot of pale tan. I remember seeing it very dark brown, I think from older jugs (one lasts me about a year). Keep it refrigerated once opened; not sure why but as Seachem suggests this i would do it.

If you bought this at the store and it was opened, i would take it back just in case; regardless of what they may say, tell them you know it was opened and may not be effective since Seachem says to keep it refrigerated once opened. It may make no difference, but might as well try.
Yea I'm gonna do that...

So in the beginning of the thread, you said you wouldn't consider those plants I mentioned not low light plants. With the lighting you now know I have and dosing flourish, what plants do you recommend? I want plants that look nice and will thrive in my conditions.
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post #23 of 53 Old 05-16-2011, 06:52 PM
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Yea I'm gonna do that...

So in the beginning of the thread, you said you wouldn't consider those plants I mentioned not low light plants. With the lighting you now know I have and dosing flourish, what plants do you recommend? I want plants that look nice and will thrive in my conditions.
I can't help but suggest swords. In a 10g species are limited as many get very large, but the pygmy chain sword is excellent, and the Dwarf Sword if you can find it. There is also a "compact" form of sword available, I have never seen it or tried it, but supposedly it doesn't grow large. Someone here mentioned it, maybe redchigh, or sincrisis...?

Sagittaria subulata may do well, it is similar (almost identical) to the pygmy chain sword but taller. Corkscrew Vallisneria should work. Something floating is always useful, and one of the best is the stem plant Brazilian Pennywort allowed to float freely; it makes a superb floating plant though it will need trimming every week or it can easily overtake the tank. But better to be cutting thriving plants back rather than tossing out dying plants.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #24 of 53 Old 05-18-2011, 04:06 AM Thread Starter
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I can't help but suggest swords. In a 10g species are limited as many get very large, but the pygmy chain sword is excellent, and the Dwarf Sword if you can find it. There is also a "compact" form of sword available, I have never seen it or tried it, but supposedly it doesn't grow large. Someone here mentioned it, maybe redchigh, or sincrisis...?

Sagittaria subulata may do well, it is similar (almost identical) to the pygmy chain sword but taller. Corkscrew Vallisneria should work. Something floating is always useful, and one of the best is the stem plant Brazilian Pennywort allowed to float freely; it makes a superb floating plant though it will need trimming every week or it can easily overtake the tank. But better to be cutting thriving plants back rather than tossing out dying plants.
I have no problem trimming while doing my weekly water changes... So i'm not worried about plants that can get very large. Which ones are you referring to?

Also whats a good site to purchase live plants? Unless you're willing to sale some of your trimmings? :)
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post #25 of 53 Old 05-18-2011, 10:33 AM
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I have no problem trimming while doing my weekly water changes... So i'm not worried about plants that can get very large. Which ones are you referring to?

Also whats a good site to purchase live plants? Unless you're willing to sale some of your trimmings? :)
Of those I mention in my last post, the chain swords, Sagittaria and Vallisneria are all substrate-rooted plants that send out runners from which adventitious plants develop every few centimetres. These will all form thick stands. I keep mine thinned out along the front only. During the water change, just cut off the runner where you don't want it continuing and pull up the plantlets, discarding them or replanting them elsewhere. Pennywort is a stem plant and will grow very fast on the surface. It is easy to prune it each water change.

I have never used online plant sources so I will leave that for those who have to suggest reliable places. I would gladly send you my trimmings of all the plants mentioned, but unless you are in Canada this is tricky.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #26 of 53 Old 05-19-2011, 04:32 PM Thread Starter
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Of those I mention in my last post, the chain swords, Sagittaria and Vallisneria are all substrate-rooted plants that send out runners from which adventitious plants develop every few centimetres. These will all form thick stands. I keep mine thinned out along the front only. During the water change, just cut off the runner where you don't want it continuing and pull up the plantlets, discarding them or replanting them elsewhere. Pennywort is a stem plant and will grow very fast on the surface. It is easy to prune it each water change.

I have never used online plant sources so I will leave that for those who have to suggest reliable places. I would gladly send you my trimmings of all the plants mentioned, but unless you are in Canada this is tricky.

Byron.
Yea I could use a good reliable source because none of my LFS have bright green plants...

I just got my Life-Glo today and wow that thing is BRIGHT. Gotta adjust my eyes to it. On the box it shows the Flora-Glo to be the brightest, but, the life-glo should work fine. So now I'm pumped to replant this thing!

I can pay for shipping if theres a way for you to send them from Canada? I live in California 90240 area
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post #27 of 53 Old 05-19-2011, 08:52 PM
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Yea I could use a good reliable source because none of my LFS have bright green plants...

I just got my Life-Glo today and wow that thing is BRIGHT. Gotta adjust my eyes to it. On the box it shows the Flora-Glo to be the brightest, but, the life-glo should work fine. So now I'm pumped to replant this thing!

I can pay for shipping if theres a way for you to send them from Canada? I live in California 90240 area
What box? Not sure what this is about.

I have sent plants to the USA a couple of times with varying, generally bad, results. It took 3 days to Texas, fine; more than a week to Calif, and dead plants, not so fine. And it is not inexpensive. There is also the risk that US customs won't allow them in; Dept of Agriculture has laws about plants entering the USA (risk of disease I believe) and they can stop them. This may have been the delay on the Calif ones.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #28 of 53 Old 05-19-2011, 09:32 PM Thread Starter
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post #29 of 53 Old 05-20-2011, 10:49 AM
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Those numbers (in degrees Kelvin) refer only to the colour temperature of the light emitted. It has no direct bearing on intensity (brightness). Kelvin around 6500K is closest to natural sunlight at midday, higher numbers indicate more blue or "coolness" to the light colour, lower numbers more red or warmness.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #30 of 53 Old 05-20-2011, 01:36 PM Thread Starter
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Those numbers (in degrees Kelvin) refer only to the colour temperature of the light emitted. It has no direct bearing on intensity (brightness). Kelvin around 6500K is closest to natural sunlight at midday, higher numbers indicate more blue or "coolness" to the light colour, lower numbers more red or warmness.
Makes sense...

Also i've been meaning to ask you Bryon, does high flow HOB filters or Air stones disturb the plants growth?

I Have two filters in this 10 gallon and an air stone and noticed the plants in the back tend to get leaned over and since oxygen removes carbon d out of the water I would assume it does?
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