filter on 55g planted tank - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

 
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post #1 of 5 Old 12-25-2011, 10:13 AM Thread Starter
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filter on 55g planted tank

I saw on another thread that you had this plant guide up with the basics, it's helping a lot and thank you for posting it =)

So I have an Emporer 280 with a bio wheel and filter cartridge (The carbon included kind, but it has not been replaced in 4 months; I just rinse it in the dirty water when making water changes. So is the carbon still working or is it ok?). Is this too much flow for my 55 gal? I have looked for sponge filters before but wasn't sure what exactly it was and never found one :/ I bought this for like 50 bucks a few months ago so I'm not going to replace it unless it's pretty necessary.

If the blue filter cartridge with it's "activated" carbon would still be detrimental to the plants is there a way I can get some other mechanical filtration media to put in my filter?

Thanks again, you've been so much help.
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post #2 of 5 Old 12-27-2011, 11:18 AM
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First, I moved this post to start its own thread. Posts in one of the "stickies" or articles can get lost. Questions are best asked in a new thread so more members will see them.

Carbon works by adsorbing substances from the water passing over it. [Note that adsorb is not absorb; adsorption is the accumulation of substances on the surface, compared to absorption which literally means to suck in, as a sponge absorbs liquids.] Depending upon the amount of substances in the aquarium that the carbon adsorbs, it will at some point no longer have the capacity to do this, and at that point it is nothing more than another solid particle over which water flows. Usually after a few weeks but sometimes only a few days. Leaving it there will then do nothing detrimental since it will have lost its adsorption capacity. However, replacing it with something that is more beneficial such as more filter floss/sponge material is better.

I'm not personally familiar with the Emperor filter, not having used one; as long as the flow down the tank is not excessive, it will likely be fine. For most forest fish you want fairly calm water movement, not a raging torrent that they have to constantly fight against. Some fish do need that, which is another reason why not all fish can be kept with all other fish. "Compatibility" has many varied aspects to it.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #3 of 5 Old 12-27-2011, 11:46 AM Thread Starter
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Ohh ok, thanks for moving it!
Hmm I see. I'm not familiar with floss or sponge at all, and my filter has an extra slot for more media. So I could take out the activated carbon and get floss and sponge. But again I'm not familiar with either and in all honesty have no idea where or how to get it and if it comes in "sizes" to fit in the hanging filters? :/
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post #4 of 5 Old 12-27-2011, 01:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by angella View Post
Ohh ok, thanks for moving it!
Hmm I see. I'm not familiar with floss or sponge at all, and my filter has an extra slot for more media. So I could take out the activated carbon and get floss and sponge. But again I'm not familiar with either and in all honesty have no idea where or how to get it and if it comes in "sizes" to fit in the hanging filters? :/
Some filters do have inserts made for them; as I'm not familiar with the Emperor, I don't know. But making your own is simple (and probably cheaper too). You can buy filter floss in a package (floss is the white cotton-looking stuff) and just stuff a bit in the filter chamber. The more you have the faster it will clog of course, so you don't want too much. The filter sponge material is sometimes available in pieces that you can cut to fit the filter slot.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #5 of 5 Old 12-27-2011, 01:43 PM Thread Starter
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Ohh ok, thank you. I will check at my lfs next time I'm there or maybe get some off ebay if there isn't.
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