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extreme aquarium makeover--new plants!

This is a discussion on extreme aquarium makeover--new plants! within the Beginner Planted Aquarium forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> @Byron...when I removed the fert tabs from my non-rooted plants (as you and Natalie suggested) I noticed a little cloudy dust coming from where ...

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extreme aquarium makeover--new plants!
Old 01-19-2010, 08:40 PM   #31
 
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@Byron...when I removed the fert tabs from my non-rooted plants (as you and Natalie suggested) I noticed a little cloudy dust coming from where they were as I removed them...so perhaps just moving and aggravating them is what stimulates the release of the clay and nutrient particles (roots, however slowly, could provide for this slow gradual movement and subsequent release of stuff).

@Angel---yes!
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Old 01-19-2010, 11:43 PM   #32
 
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I agree with Byron's conclusion of the answer from Seachem. I forgot to point out that the one word in their response that got me was should. " thus the substrates
should be self-sustaining for many years and should never
actually require replacement".

Should. Not will or are.
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Old 01-20-2010, 10:39 AM   #33
 
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Originally Posted by Mean Harri View Post
I agree with Byron's conclusion of the answer from Seachem. I forgot to point out that the one word in their response that got me was should. " thus the substrates
should be self-sustaining for many years and should never
actually require replacement".

Should. Not will or are.
Well I guess they have to give themselves an out just in case someone comes back and tries to get reparations for all their dead plants.
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Old 01-20-2010, 11:00 AM   #34
 
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Byron, don't want to highjack the thread, but wanted to say that I got talked into getting the Flourite, not knowing a thing about the live plant world in fish tanks. Anyway, I am not 100% sure I am going to get real serious right now with live plants. Even if I do or don't is this flourite substrate going to give me issues? I have gravel on top which obviously gets mixed together as time goes on from gravel cleaing. I rinsed it real well before putting it in the tank. Thanks.

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This is fine as far as it goes, but it still begs some questions. Any nutrient-laden substance is bound to lose its nutrients in time if something is using them, unless it somehow gets replenished. The soil in my garden will eventually be unable to support the plants, which is why we add manure periodically, and nutrients come via rain, and decomposing plant matter, bird droppings, insects, earthworms...there is a complex process going on to replenish the nutrients. At some point this "gravel" must deplete itself, though I accept that the aquarist may re-set the tank before this point is reached.

The point they make about nutrient release dependent upon the plant roots is significant. This goes along with the claim that the nutrients will not just leech into the water column. And that answers your (Stephanie) subsequent question about overloading the aquarium. The same seems to be true of substrate fertilizer sticks and tabs; they are only going to benefit the plants with roots in the substrate. And bearing this in mind, I agree with Angel059 that regular small-grain gravel will suffice, with substrate fertilizer added for those plants that require it. For more than 15 years I never used substrate fertilizers, just plain gravel, and the swords (which would of all plants most benefit, as I have subsequently discovered) grew very well with just liquid fertilizer.

Byron.

Last edited by HollyinWA; 01-20-2010 at 11:05 AM..
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Old 01-20-2010, 02:07 PM   #35
 
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Originally Posted by HollyinWA View Post
Byron, don't want to highjack the thread, but wanted to say that I got talked into getting the Flourite, not knowing a thing about the live plant world in fish tanks. Anyway, I am not 100% sure I am going to get real serious right now with live plants. Even if I do or don't is this flourite substrate going to give me issues? I have gravel on top which obviously gets mixed together as time goes on from gravel cleaing. I rinsed it real well before putting it in the tank. Thanks.
Having bought the Flourite, I myself would not waste it in a non-plant tank. It would appear to be harmless with respect to adding nutrients to the water column, if we accept their word. But as it must have some nutritive value to plants, I would certainly plant the tank and make use of it.

And on that note, if the fish in the tank are plant-friendly, I would encourage you to plant it. The incredible benefit to the water quality and stability from plants is something every aquarium should have, for the improved health of the fish. And in my humble opinion, there is no disputing the fact that plants will mean healthier fish, all else being equal.

Byron.
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Old 01-20-2010, 05:25 PM   #36
 
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Having bought the Flourite, I myself would not waste it in a non-plant tank. It would appear to be harmless with respect to adding nutrients to the water column, if we accept their word. But as it must have some nutritive value to plants, I would certainly plant the tank and make use of it.

And on that note, if the fish in the tank are plant-friendly, I would encourage you to plant it. The incredible benefit to the water quality and stability from plants is something every aquarium should have, for the improved health of the fish. And in my humble opinion, there is no disputing the fact that plants will mean healthier fish, all else being equal.

Byron.
I was just wondering this morning if there was an article or sticky on here about "the benefits of a planted aquarium" or something. I can think of several off the top of my head, and I'm sure there are so many more than I know. Maybe some time I'll start a thread like that. The purpose for me would be to propogate what I consider a healthier approach to fish keeping (healthy for the fish that is). And on a subjective note I think it's so beautiful to see live plants. I honestly believe my fish love the live plants.
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