extreme aquarium makeover--new plants! - Page 3
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Beginner Freshwater Aquarium » Beginner Planted Aquarium » extreme aquarium makeover--new plants!

extreme aquarium makeover--new plants!

This is a discussion on extreme aquarium makeover--new plants! within the Beginner Planted Aquarium forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> Didn't you mention your swords' leaves yellowed after reducing liquid ferts to twice weekly? That would make me think they feed from the water ...

Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
extreme aquarium makeover--new plants!
Old 01-17-2010, 03:44 PM   #21
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Didn't you mention your swords' leaves yellowed after reducing liquid ferts to twice weekly? That would make me think they feed from the water supply as well. And I'm not scientist but don't they assimilate nutrients in the water through their roots, too? (Like, from the water running through the gravel?). This has no practical importance to me, I'm just thinking about what you said in the quoted part above.
Yes, all aquatic plants in the aquarium assimilate nutrients from the water via their roots and (some) their leaves. The water passes through the substrate bringing nutrients to the roots. The liquid fert or the root sticks/tabs release nutrients into the water and the roots take them up. Which is why a healthy substrate, not compacted, is important. Many of the substrate-rooted plants in our aquaria are bog plants in nature, their roots permanently under water and the leaves emersed half the year and submersed the other half. And water passes through the substrate in nature as in the healthy aquarium.

Even my larger swords with the root sticks seem to be a bit greener with twice weekly liquid. But then as I have often written, Echinodorus are very heavy feeders.

Quote:
Second question: So do you now place root tabs by your smaller swords as well?
No. Only the largest swords get root sticks. Although, in thinking about that, I think all the E. bleheri now have a root stick. So that leaves only the pygmy chain swords in both tanks that don't, and they certainly don't need it, their runners appear regularly and I cut off almost all of them to keep them from overtaking the tanks. Nothing in the Asian setup gets substrate ferts.

Quote:
About all my questions...I thought I'd be asking LESS questions the more I learned, but the total opposite is happening! I think I should start subscribing to some of these magazines you keep referring to so i can stop burning holes in this forum!
We never stop learning. I have learned so much this past year from being on this forum, both from the forum threads directly and because of research something here has caused me to pursue. Twenty years ago I had to rely on monthly magazines and the odd book. Now there is a wealth of information right here.

B.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2010, 04:13 PM   #22
 
Angel079's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by stephanieleah View Post
Good idea about the photos! About the vallis...the ones in front were out of control so I took a bunch out that were in the middle (and threw them away!). The new vallis is in the rear of the tank. I read I think AuntKymmie or Twistersmom mentioned about their vallis and that if they snip the little runner root thing that the plants make new leaves and become bushier rather than running all over. So I'm going to start doing that with my vallis. I was just moving it around to keep it in a smaller area, but snipping it would be WAY easier.

By the way, do you use root fertilizer with your rotala indica (I know you have a bunch in one of your tanks).
Throwing plants away....shhheessss....Consider adding them to the classifies here there's several members who'd gladly take them off your hands and pay the postage for it

No root ferts/ sticks really only then help you (your plants) if you're having Swords. Stem plants like Rotala or Vallis (most of what's seen in your tank actually) would feed off leaf's which means liquid ferts to be used. Comprehensive all in 1 liquid ferts are available from Saechems (sp?) Nutrafin etc.
To answer your question about my Rotala's heck no that stuff grows worst then weed in my 45g and I already gotta trim 2-3" each week to keep it somewhat from over taking my surface; I wouldn't dare wanna add ferts to that.
Angel079 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2010, 04:17 PM   #23
 
Angel079's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
Even my larger swords with the root sticks seem to be a bit greener with twice weekly liquid. But then as I have often written, Echinodorus are very heavy feeders.
Byron...careful what you wish for ... recall me starting ferts (liquid and tablets) in the 55g for the first time....well I figured Swords need the sticks, so I added a half stick to my E. Quadricostatus......boy I can tell ya I ain't ever gonna do this again Unless you wanna have a CARPET of them in no time at all, don't feed this plant extra, its EXPLODED in the tank and honestly its going so wild its not even pretty any more, its like EVERYWHERE all over my 55g...Its the aquatic version of honeysuckle...ONE lil piece can cover a super large area in no time
Angel079 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2010, 05:25 PM   #24
 
stephanieleah's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Angel079 View Post
Throwing plants away....shhheessss....Consider adding them to the classifies here there's several members who'd gladly take them off your hands and pay the postage for it

No root ferts/ sticks really only then help you (your plants) if you're having Swords. Stem plants like Rotala or Vallis (most of what's seen in your tank actually) would feed off leaf's which means liquid ferts to be used. Comprehensive all in 1 liquid ferts are available from Saechems (sp?) Nutrafin etc.
To answer your question about my Rotala's heck no that stuff grows worst then weed in my 45g and I already gotta trim 2-3" each week to keep it somewhat from over taking my surface; I wouldn't dare wanna add ferts to that.
Well, so far, everything I've taken out wouldn't be worth salvaging. I usually try to remove only the unhealthy looking stuff (and there's still lots of it since I just started fertilizing lately and I had those bright lights until a few days ago). I do want to get rid of a bulb, though...maybe I'll post that.
stephanieleah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2010, 05:40 PM   #25
 
Mean Harri's Avatar
 
I got the answer from Seachem. Copied and pasted...

Thank you so much for your questions and also for
your interest in some of our substrates. I will try my
best to answer them for you. Because all of our planted
substrates are naturally-occurring gravels, rather than
synthetic ones, they inherently contain nutrients that are
slowly released, many not released unless actively
transported by the plant roots. Because some other
substrates available on the market are simply soaked in
nutrients, they will eventually be completely devoid of
these things and will therefore become inert. This is not
the case with the Flourite varieties, thus the substrates
should be self-sustaining for many years and should never
actually require replacement.
Mean Harri is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2010, 06:49 PM   #26
 
stephanieleah's Avatar
 
that's interesting...I wonder what that means in terms of quantities...because at first I thought that maybe I'm overdosing fertilizers, but then again, could a substrate give my plants everything it needs on a day-to-day basis if the supply lasts--forever??? I'll just keep on doing what I'm doing (the substrate was not enough for me...I had to start using liquid ferts).

And at some point I'm going to need to see your real photo because it's hard to believe that your avatar really isn't you.
stephanieleah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2010, 07:31 PM   #27
 
Angel079's Avatar
 
I'd just go with regulator sand/ gravel and then treat the plants individually based of their needs, eg if you have a bunch Swords add root sticks 1-2x year, if you have a load of stem plants only, use liquid ferts.
You know its kinda like outdoor veggie gardening, if I was to do all sand, carrots will thrive but tomatoes or Cheyennes won't, am I doing all local soil mixed with organic top soil the tomatoes will thrive but not the carrots....I find the same individual approach in the tank world works great.
Angel079 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2010, 06:24 PM   #28
 
Mean Harri's Avatar
 
HAHA Stephanie. Honestly that is not me in the avatar. There is a story as to why I have that avatar. And I only have that particular one because I happened across it somehwere and thought it was funny and shared it with my friends that I game with. Which, in fact is where the whole turtle thing started. Maybe I better change it. I would feel bad if you spit, choked, and puked every time you see it.
Mean Harri is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2010, 07:16 PM   #29
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mean Harri View Post
I got the answer from Seachem. Copied and pasted...

Thank you so much for your questions and also for
your interest in some of our substrates. I will try my
best to answer them for you. Because all of our planted
substrates are naturally-occurring gravels, rather than
synthetic ones, they inherently contain nutrients that are
slowly released, many not released unless actively
transported by the plant roots. Because some other
substrates available on the market are simply soaked in
nutrients, they will eventually be completely devoid of
these things and will therefore become inert. This is not
the case with the Flourite varieties, thus the substrates
should be self-sustaining for many years and should never
actually require replacement.
This is fine as far as it goes, but it still begs some questions. Any nutrient-laden substance is bound to lose its nutrients in time if something is using them, unless it somehow gets replenished. The soil in my garden will eventually be unable to support the plants, which is why we add manure periodically, and nutrients come via rain, and decomposing plant matter, bird droppings, insects, earthworms...there is a complex process going on to replenish the nutrients. At some point this "gravel" must deplete itself, though I accept that the aquarist may re-set the tank before this point is reached.

The point they make about nutrient release dependent upon the plant roots is significant. This goes along with the claim that the nutrients will not just leech into the water column. And that answers your (Stephanie) subsequent question about overloading the aquarium. The same seems to be true of substrate fertilizer sticks and tabs; they are only going to benefit the plants with roots in the substrate. And bearing this in mind, I agree with Angel059 that regular small-grain gravel will suffice, with substrate fertilizer added for those plants that require it. For more than 15 years I never used substrate fertilizers, just plain gravel, and the swords (which would of all plants most benefit, as I have subsequently discovered) grew very well with just liquid fertilizer.

Byron.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2010, 07:24 PM   #30
 
Angel079's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mean Harri View Post
Honestly that is not me in the avatar.
I'd say we leave that matter pending until proofen otherwise - What do you say Steph?
Angel079 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
25% off all aquarium plants Angel079 Beginner Planted Aquarium 7 03-05-2010 08:38 AM
Home Makeover (55g) Angel079 Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 36 01-27-2010 10:32 PM
Extreme Ick TheBoss Tropical Fish Diseases 4 09-02-2009 05:49 PM
Plants for New Aquarium milindsaraswala Beginner Planted Aquarium 8 04-04-2008 07:11 AM
55g makeover HankB Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 4 03-30-2008 09:40 PM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:35 PM.