Do aquarium plants "spread" - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
 
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post #1 of 9 Old 01-23-2010, 06:39 PM Thread Starter
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Do aquarium plants "spread"

Hi folks

Do aquarium plants "spread" or do they tend to grow as individual plants. Whilst I understand different species shall behave differently, I thought that most plants would "eventually" grow a root structure that would lead to new shoots continually sprouting around the initial plant (given the correct conditions / feeding of course) or does this only happen with those pesky weeds on the driveway!!!!


Thanks

Kenster

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post #2 of 9 Old 01-23-2010, 08:42 PM
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That really dep what plant you're looking at?

Like Vallis or Chainswords built runners; eithe ryou can leave these where they grow or pinch off & replant.
Java Ferns for example have the 'baby plants' growing on the actual leaf.
Stem plants you reproduce by pinching them off and replant the pinched off part.
Crypts built lil shoots to the side, once they're big enough you can take these off if you'd want.

I could really better help you out with the question if I knew what plants you have there?

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post #3 of 9 Old 01-23-2010, 08:48 PM
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Just to be clear, plant spread is technically the one plant spreading out or becoming larger but remaining one plant. Sometimes one can divide a large plant, creating two plants, similar to some garden plants. Plants themselves multiply or reproduce/propagate by different methods to create new daughter plants.

Assuming it is the latter, reproduction, to which you refer, some plant species propagate by sending out runners from which daughter plants will grow. Echinodorus (swords) do this, as does Cryptocoryne (crypts), Vallisneria, Sagitarria, and others. Some form daughter plants on the leaves, like Java Fern and Ceratopteris.

Anubias have rhizomes, and these will continue to grow and often develop side-shoots, all remaining connected; but the aquarist can break them apart as individual plants. This is not the same as the division I mentioned initially, where I was thinking of large Echinodorus that can have the rootstock cut apart with a knife to create two plants.

Stem plants tend to remain one stem, though some will branch, and continue to grow towards the light and/or along the surface, and these can be cut apart at any point to create new plants.

Many of those weeds in the driveway actually seed themselves, and many aquarium plants are flowering plants that will, under certain conditions, flower and produce fertile seeds. Echinodorus and Cryptocoryne also use this method of reproduction, though rarely in an aquarium; in nature they are bog plants that either spend all their time in marshy conditions or are emersed half the year and submersed half the year during the flood season, and they will only flower when emersed; the flower stalks produced regularly by Echinodorus will normally just produce plantlets when grown permanently submersed.

Byron.

P.S. I see after posting Angel has responded simultaneously.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #4 of 9 Old 01-25-2010, 02:44 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks guys,

(on a seperate issue, Byron, do you plan (on paper) your planted tanks before starting them? Or do you start with a tank and add / move things around until you get it the way you like it?

PS, when I ask do you plan I include fish as well as plants in this question

Cheers

Kenster

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post #5 of 9 Old 01-25-2010, 03:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kenster View Post
Thanks guys,

(on a separate issue, Byron, do you plan (on paper) your planted tanks before starting them? Or do you start with a tank and add / move things around until you get it the way you like it?

PS, when I ask do you plan I include fish as well as plants in this question

Cheers

Kenster
First, I design the aquarium for the fish, always. I decide I want a tank for Amazonian fish, and knowing there are two broad categories, very quiet sedate fish (most pencilfish, discus or angelfish for obvious examples) and somewhat more active fish (some tetras like the Hyphessobrycon rosy-coloured species, Pristella, etc). There are many fish that would overlap and fit in either, but combining the more active tetras with something like Nanobrycon eques (the diptail pencilfish) could frighten the latter into not eating. So I plan around the fish. I always have a few species in mind, but I know there will be others of similar nature that would fit later.

I then decide on a geographic style that will suit the fish. The more active swimmers are in the Amazonian riverscape 115g, while the slower pencilfish and such are in the flooded Amazon forest where the water is almost motionless. Filtration is then decided on this basis, whether or not current is needed and how much. Decor is compatible with the theme, wood in both these examples rather than rock. While I don't do biotope tanks [which are near-exact "replicas" of a specific stream or lake in terms of fish, plants and decor], I am a firm believer in geographic aquaria, where all fish and plants and decor are found in the same geographic area, which can be as in these two examples as broad as the Amazon basin. This prevents any problems with water parameters since they are identical, and it makes finding suitable tankmates much easier.

I always use fine gravel for substrate, and natural or dark. Then I shop for suitable chunks of wood, though I frequently add more over the next few weeks rather than all at once. Same with plants; I know the species native to the area, so I buy what I can find at first, but sometimes may be adding a plant or two weeks or months later if I find one I couldn't get previously. Same with the fish really; I know what I want as basics, but it may take months to find all of them, and along the way new species may turn up that fit the scheme.

I arrange the wood according to its shape--longer pieces will probably be standing tree trunks, and flatter pieces fallen bogwood or exposed tree roots on the substrate. Sometimes the fish come into this; my three Tatia perugiae (spotted woodcats) must have wood with tunnels near a filter current, as that is their habitat, and they spend all day in the tunnels, coming out at feeding time and during total darkness. You always have to provide what the fish need to be less stressed.

I frequently move the wood around, and the plants, sometimes for months. My present 115g came together the first day, and hasn't changed except for a few plants being removed when they grew in and I wanted more open area. But the 90g has evolved much more over seven months. The Asian setup, my 70g, is thrown together; I am still waiting for some specific plants before I aquascape it the way I have in mind.

Hope this answers your question Kenster. Ask away if anything occurs to you.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]

Last edited by Byron; 01-25-2010 at 03:47 PM.
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post #6 of 9 Old 01-25-2010, 06:06 PM
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if i may partially hijack...

its my understanding that for the most part, aquarium plants wont reproduce without our intervention? i ask because i have a planted 20L with ambulia, water wisteria, red ludwigia, a sword of some swort (lol) and an amazon sword, and now a budding tiger lotus plant. I want that puppy to poof right out :) if its the case where most of those plants wont reproduce on their own, ill do my research for propagating them.

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post #7 of 9 Old 01-25-2010, 06:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beetlebz View Post
if i may partially hijack...

its my understanding that for the most part, aquarium plants wont reproduce without our intervention? i ask because i have a planted 20L with ambulia, water wisteria, red ludwigia, a sword of some swort (lol) and an amazon sword, and now a budding tiger lotus plant. I want that puppy to poof right out :) if its the case where most of those plants wont reproduce on their own, ill do my research for propagating them.
To reproduce what you have AND make the ones you have grow bushier:
Wisteria, Ludwigia > Pinch off stems and replant in gravel/ sand they'll root down fairly quick. Pinch of parts at least 2" long for best results. The stem at which you had pinched off will then develop 2 new shoots looking like a Y.
The Anubias built side shoots that once they have roots on them you can also take off and attach to a new piece DW if you'd want to.
The tiger like I said in the other thread, let it grow out some now, once yu have several big leaf's on it, pinch off the tallest one's and it'll then grow bushier. Also over time (slow growers) they will built lil side shoots you can replant then. Same for the Sword they built side shoots once they have some root system you can replant.

~ Life Is Too Short, Break The Rules, Forgive Quickly, Kiss Slowly, Love Truly, Laugh Uncontrollably And Never Regret Anything that Made You Smile.
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post #8 of 9 Old 01-25-2010, 06:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beetlebz View Post
if i may partially hijack...

its my understanding that for the most part, aquarium plants wont reproduce without our intervention? i ask because i have a planted 20L with ambulia, water wisteria, red ludwigia, a sword of some swort (lol) and an amazon sword, and now a budding tiger lotus plant. I want that puppy to poof right out :) if its the case where most of those plants wont reproduce on their own, ill do my research for propagating them.
Angel has answered, but I did answer this in my post #3 earlier in this thread. Not a problem, we do sometimes get off on tangents and its hard to remember what has or hasn't been covered. B.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #9 of 9 Old 01-25-2010, 08:44 PM
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no no, you did byron, just wanted to make sure i was pickin up what youre puttin down and not taking it to mean what i wanted it to :)

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