DIY CO2 system in 30 gallon? - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #1 of 15 Old 09-29-2010, 04:31 PM Thread Starter
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DIY CO2 system in 30 gallon?

Hey I have a planted 30 gallon, not heavily but semi, and have made a typical 2 litre DIY c02 system.

This amount of CO2 should suffice?? It's ~1 bubble per second.

I will add details of the system/video later tonight if needed.

Thanks in Advance,

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post #2 of 15 Old 10-02-2010, 10:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Backer View Post
Hey I have a planted 30 gallon, not heavily but semi, and have made a typical 2 litre DIY c02 system.

This amount of CO2 should suffice?? It's ~1 bubble per second.

I will add details of the system/video later tonight if needed.

Thanks in Advance,

Backer

To be honest, I'd dose with a liquid fertiliser and forget the CO2 altogether. Read the stickies written by byron at the top of the topic list

What lighting are you using? How many watts?

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post #3 of 15 Old 10-02-2010, 11:36 AM
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If you do go with the CO2, you should probably set up another bottle or two.

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post #4 of 15 Old 10-02-2010, 12:08 PM
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Ah yes, I agree. IF you go with it, then you're going to want to run two so you can stagger them... That way you have consistant output.

You really need to tell us how much light and fertilisers, since if you're not using much CO2 can be a bad thing.

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post #5 of 15 Old 10-02-2010, 05:49 PM
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I'd also question the approach as to why?
Are you trying to go for a very high end set up with high lights, high ferts etc or what is the goal there??

For a normal pretty hobbyist tank set up I'd suggest just liquid fert (such as Flourish comprehensive) and well balanced lights (always try aim for 6500K). You can gladly check out my tanks here and non them run with co2 http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/p...hp?userid=1029

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post #6 of 15 Old 10-03-2010, 12:57 PM Thread Starter
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hey guys, I'm running a 50/50 actinic reef sun bulb, 24 inch, not sure of the wattage, and just wanna know the best way to keep my plants healthy really. I have a fertilizer stick under my gravel and that's basically it. Just want a nice green tank.

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post #7 of 15 Old 10-03-2010, 01:00 PM
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You should switch out your actinic bulbs for daylight bulbs. Actinics are more for corals than plants, and they're pretty good at growing algae. It should say the wattage on the bulb. What type of bulbs are they? T5, T8, T5HO, etc. The number after the T stands for the eights of an inch of the bulb's diameter. T5HOs are the strongest type. As for fertilizers, you should probably dose Seachem Flourish, a plant fertilizer.

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post #8 of 15 Old 10-03-2010, 01:12 PM Thread Starter
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I think I will Switch out the lighting, but after it dies. because they're really not cheap lol. Thanks for your help.

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post #9 of 15 Old 10-04-2010, 01:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Backer View Post
hey guys, I'm running a 50/50 actinic reef sun bulb, 24 inch, not sure of the wattage, and just wanna know the best way to keep my plants healthy really. I have a fertilizer stick under my gravel and that's basically it. Just want a nice green tank.
In my view you will not have healthy plants with this light. I don't know the technical reason behind it, but I have never found one botanist or planted tank authority who has not said that plants will not manage under actinic light. It is obviously too blue and not enough red, but there must be more to it than that. On the other hand, algae grows very well under this (or any) light, so you will be battling that as well. Thriving plant growth makes life very difficult for algae. All the nutrients and CO2 will do nothing for the plants if the light is inadequate. Light is the single most important aspect of a planted tank.

You don't need to replace the fixture, just the tubes. And the best ones for planted aquaria are very inexpensive. You can buy "daylight" tubes with a kelvin rating around 6500K at most hardware stores for a few dollars. GE, Phillips, Sylvania all make them. The are no different in light colour and intensity than the much more expensive "aquarium" manufacturer tubes. Just measure the length of the existing tubes and buy the same in the other type. Make sure you get T8 if your fixture is regular fluorescent; a T5 fixture requires T5 tubes as the prongs are different.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]

Last edited by Byron; 10-04-2010 at 06:08 PM. Reason: correct sp
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post #10 of 15 Old 10-04-2010, 05:46 PM
I agree you need to ditch the 50/50 bulb as they do not work good at all for freshwater. Plants live by using the light, improper light means improper growth. Its no different then feeding a animal an improper diet and expecting it to grow up fit an healthy. Also for planted aquarium you should change the bulb long before it dies out on you. I have never had a bulb die before, I change mine about every 2 years which is less often then suggested. A T5 bulb ordered online will cost $10-20 (yours is 24 watts BTW), I can suggest you some replacements if you want.

As far as the CO2, what kind of filter do you have? Depending on the filter trying to use CO2 may be totally ineffective especially with DIY.

Having a nice green densely planted tank doesn't require CO2 or high light. It does require balance and the proper plants. Going towards the high end tank can certainly be enjoyable IMO. It does require more work though. Daily dosing of fertilizer, which can be very expensive if you don't mix it up yourself. Then you got all that trimming to do, which usually NEEDs to be done weekly just so they have room to grow some more....

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