co2 for plants - Page 3
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Beginner Freshwater Aquarium » Beginner Planted Aquarium » co2 for plants

co2 for plants

This is a discussion on co2 for plants within the Beginner Planted Aquarium forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> Originally Posted by funkman262 Theoretically? No. You may want to study up on Henry's Law: "At a constant temperature, the amount of a given ...

Like Tree1Likes

Reply
Old 01-31-2013, 03:11 AM   #21
ao
 
ao's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by funkman262 View Post
Theoretically? No.

You may want to study up on Henry's Law: "At a constant temperature, the amount of a given gas dissolved in a given type and volume of liquid is directly proportional to the partial pressure of that gas in equilibrium with that liquid."

The partial pressure of CO2 in air is about 0.04% of the total pressure so I'm confused how you have any reason to believe this would work. Think about it; even those of us that are using pure CO2 are still trying to design better methods for more efficient dissolution of the CO2 into water. We've got rex rigs, cerges reactors, ladders, bells, and many others, yet the hunt may never be over. I hope you understand the dead end you're running into and just save yourself some time and effort.
I'm not saying that the method will replace Co2 in anyway, just increase...
ao is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2013, 03:34 AM   #22
ao
 
ao's Avatar
 
Oops fell asleep on the editing, lol... here's the rest
so I was trying to say that the partial pressure affects the stability of the dissolved gasse in the water, and even CO2 will want to be gased out. And for all te ladders and bells, you guys are trying to not waste the CO2 that costs money to buy. and therefore 100% dissolution is ideal. air in it's own way is limitless.
Also the air is simply a mixture of that happens to have CO2, it is not a chemical bond. it is also more readily soluable than oxygen and nitrogen.
ao is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2013, 05:20 AM   #23
JDM
 
JDM's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by squishylittlefishies View Post
Woahwoahwoahwoawoa...
This discussion is getting way too technical and sciencey. I'm totally lost. Basically The message I got is that It's waaaaaaaaaaaaaaay too complicated, so I should toss that Idea. Does a heavily planted tank really need the extra co2? Is the only reason people add co2 because algae thrives in low co2 environments? So, can the plants still thrive in low co2, cuz algae is NOT an issue: I LOVE algae-eaters.
Thanks!
The short answer, no, it doesn't need it. Check out my tank in my profile and many others here, most dont use it. Just water, light and nutrients. The issue is that in creating a higher energy system(lots of light and fertilization) that CO2 becomes the limiting ingredient and plants will only grow according to the least abundant factor. So, big lights in general means that you need it in order to keep growing at the faster rate that you are expecting due to everything else going on.

Algae thrive in unbalanced environments, too much light, too much of some other ingredients and the plants slow down due to something missing and they are no longer taking up a balanced load, the algae then pick up the slack.

Balanced is better.

I've got 12 species of plant and well over 60 plants now in a 37 gallon with LED lighting (lower light). They are thriving and my dwarf Hygrophilia stems are growing about an inch a day, literally. Swords have almost replaced all the brown leaves that came with them four weeks ago, red,ludwigia have all sorts of new shoots, etc, etc.

Jeff
Byron likes this.
JDM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2013, 06:05 AM   #24
ao
 
ao's Avatar
 
^+1 yeah toss the CO2 idea ^___^
just the idea of doing refills puts me off...

many lowlight plants ( i believe JDM can provide you a good list by now) needs very little care to thrive. some of mine just survived a 1 month black out.

It is also useless to input CO2 in a lowlight tank as the plants wont need it
ao is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2013, 10:18 AM   #25
JDM
 
JDM's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aokashi View Post
^+1 yeah toss the CO2 idea ^___^
just the idea of doing refills puts me off...

many lowlight plants ( i believe JDM can provide you a good list by now) needs very little care to thrive. some of mine just survived a 1 month black out.

It is also useless to input CO2 in a lowlight tank as the plants wont need it
Here is my tank on the 20th of this month, the 28th and last night, the 30th. I don't think I fertilized in that period and the 20th was right before my 75% water change.

For reference, the tank is 20" high.

It's not as obvious in the other plants but the differences are there as well, the red ludwigia that looks like the stems have disappeared are all floating up top right now, the catfish knocked them loose and I haven't gotten around to replanting them... need to come up with a catfish friendly arrangement first. They have tons (for them) of new growth.

BTW, given what I saw with a cycle a week ago this tank is not heavily planted enough to have a true silent cycle.

Jeff.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg progress jan 20, 2013.jpg (71.4 KB, 17 views)
File Type: jpg progress jan 28, 2013.jpg (80.1 KB, 17 views)
File Type: jpg Progress Jan 30, 2013.jpg (76.6 KB, 18 views)
JDM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2013, 11:46 AM   #26
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by squishylittlefishies View Post
Woahwoahwoahwoawoa...
This discussion is getting way too technical and sciencey. I'm totally lost. Basically The message I got is that It's waaaaaaaaaaaaaaay too complicated, so I should toss that Idea. Does a heavily planted tank really need the extra co2? Is the only reason people add co2 because algae thrives in low co2 environments? So, can the plants still thrive in low co2, cuz algae is NOT an issue: I LOVE algae-eaters.
Thanks!
Jeff has responded and I agree with that, but will just add a couple comments.

Algae (meaning the green or red types that cause us the most problems) is controlled by light. If the light is not more intense than what the plants require, and provided all nutrients are available for the plants, the plants will out-compete algae. Such algae problems arise only when the nutrients fail (any one of them) and light continues, because plant photosynthesis then slows or may even stop and algae takes advantage.

I use moderate light over all my tanks; check the photos under the "Aquariums" tab below my name on the left to see what is possible with this moderate light and no CO2. There will be sufficient natural CO2 from the breakdown of organics in the substrate to supply the plants up to some point. If the light does not go beyond that point, plants will thrive and algae will not.

Not all plants manage with moderate light. There are low light plants, moderate light plants, and a few requiring high light. When you get to the high light, CO2 diffusion is usually necessary to balance, or again you will have algae increasing.

Byron.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2013, 05:47 AM   #27
 
NUNSTER's Avatar
 
Isn't there more O2 in the air than co2? If so, wouldn't you be putting more O2 than CO2 in the tank with an atomizer and air pump?
All I know it that running a CO2 set up is so simple and easy I'll stick with my CO2. Oh and at night you should be using bublers to get the CO2 levels down at night. Hay theres the answer. If I am using bubles at night to get CO2 levels down at night, how would room air bubbles increase the CO2 in the tank?
Even though I might of stoped using a bottle when I was a child I am not going to stop using this bottle. CO2 bottle that is.
NUNSTER is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Tags
air, aquarium, diy, feeding, planted

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:24 AM.