Co2
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Co2

This is a discussion on Co2 within the Beginner Planted Aquarium forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> Hey, So I am really not sure where to put this thread...but I figured I would put it here because the major question is ...

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Old 02-17-2011, 10:45 PM   #1
 
Co2

Hey,

So I am really not sure where to put this thread...but I figured I would put it here because the major question is about a CO2 diffuser and regulator.

I am doing a project on the effect of CO2 on the population density of gnathostomulida...these are microscopic marine worms that live in between the sand particles in marine settings.(I can explain a bit more if anyone wants be too...though people usually drift away when I start explaining them) Anyway I have thus been looking into CO2 diffusers and regulators and am a little confused about them... mostly how you set up a regulator and how difficult it is. If anyone could point me to a good how to place that would be awesome...or if someone could explain that would also be awesome...I mean do you just attach the regulator to the canister and then the diffuser to the regulator? Is it that simple?

Thanks in advance ^_^
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Old 02-18-2011, 12:10 AM   #2
 
Technically it is that easy BUT it all depends on the type of co2 kit you buy. Some are simpler to install then others. They usally come with pretty good installation instructions. Do a google search on co2 kits and see which one fits your needs the best, there are quite a few makes and models.
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Old 02-18-2011, 12:11 AM   #3
 
not that simple especially if it is for a experiment. You need a regulator, bubble counter, needle valve, check valve, then diffuser. CO2 must be checked on the tank then for levels. Normally a drop checker is sufficient for this, but I highly doubt it has the accuracy you need for a experiment.
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Old 02-21-2011, 01:43 PM   #4
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikaila31 View Post
not that simple especially if it is for a experiment. You need a regulator, bubble counter, needle valve, check valve, then diffuser. CO2 must be checked on the tank then for levels. Normally a drop checker is sufficient for this, but I highly doubt it has the accuracy you need for a experiment.
I totally agree..I am just trying to get some insight into how these components are all set up in the grand scheme of things..for example I know the bubble counter monitors CO2...but how does it and what is it connected too...I dunno I have done research on all of these components so I know a little bit on all of them but for some reason they are not all coming together in my head, which is why I am begging for help here.

Also I know about the drop checker...I am currently looking up better alternatives...so if anyone has any suggestions it would be greatly appreciated.
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Old 02-24-2011, 01:02 AM   #5
 
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Originally Posted by pirasha View Post
I totally agree..I am just trying to get some insight into how these components are all set up in the grand scheme of things..for example I know the bubble counter monitors CO2...but how does it and what is it connected too...I dunno I have done research on all of these components so I know a little bit on all of them but for some reason they are not all coming together in my head, which is why I am begging for help here.

Also I know about the drop checker...I am currently looking up better alternatives...so if anyone has any suggestions it would be greatly appreciated.
Bubble counter litterally counts bubbles of CO2 passing through the line to the tank. It doesn't really monitor CO2 as much as it "measures" it in a sense. It is simply a plastic or glass vial usually filled with water. The line enters at the bottom and CO2 forms a bubble and rises to the top. Hence the CO2 traveling through the line is measured as a rate called "Bubbles per second" or BPS, How many bubbles pass through the bubble counter each second. Its generally just an eyeballed value, hence not very accurate. It is NOT equal to the CO2 present in the tank. There are SOOO many variables here, such as water chemistry, diffusion rate, uptake rate, gas out rate, ect. The BPS measurement does not correlate at all to the actual in tank CO2 levels. This measurement is left to the drop checker.

The drop checker is a weird glass/plastic shaped device, often a bent teardrop shape. It measures CO2 levels using a pH dependent reagent added to a few mL of water. This is placed in the round sphere "bottom" of the drop checker. When properly placed in the tank air is trapped between the reagent mixture and the tank water. Now the drop checker works on the basis of simple diffusion. You inject CO2 into the tank and it will eventually gas out of the water due to diffusion. Since the drop checker is open to the surface of the tank water CO2 will gas into it. As CO2 builds up in the air inside the drop checker it will want to move into the reagent mixture the drop checker holds. CO2 we know effects pH so it will cause a color change due to the pH dependent reagent. Generally if it turns blue=low, green=good, yellow=high. You can make a drop checker much more accurate by mixing up a solution of water with a SPECIFIC calculated hardness, the most commonly used is a 4 degree Carbonate Hardness solution(DKH). Its pretty simple to make and can give you much more targeted values. CO2 in the tank is measured as PPM or particles per million, much of what I have said is assuming your target is around 30ppm of CO2. If you wish to change your target, you much change the reagent mixture.... Thats where things can get a little complicated. Increasing the hardness of the mixture will give it greater resistance to pH changes, decreasing it will make it more sensitive to the CO2. It has to due with buffering capacity.

Hope that makes sense!
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