co2 - Page 2 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #11 of 27 Old 02-14-2007, 08:55 PM
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A ph controller is not necessary. If you get one, it's just one more thing to do maintenance on, as it needs to be periodically calibrated, and the probe needs cleaning on occasion. I used to use mine, but have removed it. I run everything on a timer so when the lights come on, so does the CO2. And the CO2 shuts off at night when the lights go out.

Even though it is the same planet, underwater is a whole different world.
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post #12 of 27 Old 02-15-2007, 11:49 PM Thread Starter
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Well I just ordered the regulator that you recommended now I have to get a tank and a stone. I have a canister filter so I guess I will run it under the intake of that and just do it that way. If that doesn't work to my satisfaction I think I have a powerhead in the basement that I can use. What 3 things or 4 or how many ever should I be running in the canister for best plant growth?
Thanks for all info it has really been helpful
Gary
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post #13 of 27 Old 02-16-2007, 01:14 AM
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Once you get it set up, look to start at about 1 to 1.5 bubbles per second. This should give plenty CO2. Also remember that if a tank get's pretty thick, in other words, heavily planted, I would run an airstone at night, or a powerhead directed at the surface, to cause aggitation. Plants produce O2 during the day, but use O2 at night, and could strip the O2 from the water, killing your fish. I had this happen when I was very heavily planted. But now I run powerheads that ripple the waters surface, and have not had that problem.

As for running it during the day, you can. But remember, more surface aggitation requires more CO2 to be added, or a higher bubble rate. You don't need any surface aggitation during the day, but I recommend it after lights out.

Lastly, BBA is caused by a fluctuating CO2 level. If your levels are too low, and keep dropping out, you will get BBA in due time. Also, have a ph and kh test kit to keep tab on your CO2 levels until you get your bubble count to the desired level. Your goal is a minimum of 30ppm, up to about 50ppm. This will give the best plant growth, IMO. I generally keep mine at a minimum if 45-60ppm, but I'm probably running a ton more light than you will be, as well as have a much more densly planted tank. But the minimum should never go below 30ppm. Some say 25ppm, but I like being a little more than bare minimum. lol.

And remember, feel free to ask any questions. We are here to help where we can.

Even though it is the same planet, underwater is a whole different world.
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post #14 of 27 Old 02-16-2007, 09:03 AM Thread Starter
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What does BBA mean?
Sorry I just don't know all the abbreviations yet.
Thanks
Gary
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post #15 of 27 Old 02-16-2007, 09:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by solareclipsed
What does BBA mean?
Black Brush Algae.:)

GSA-Green Spot Algae
BGA-Blue-Green Algae

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post #16 of 27 Old 02-16-2007, 09:51 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue
Quote:
Originally Posted by solareclipsed
What does BBA mean?
Black Brush Algae.:)

GSA-Green Spot Algae
BGA-Blue-Green Algae

Thank you very much.
Gary
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post #17 of 27 Old 02-28-2007, 09:59 PM Thread Starter
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How do I monitor the co2 levels in the tank? Is there a test kit for doing this?
Thanks
Gary
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post #18 of 27 Old 02-28-2007, 10:20 PM
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You need to test your ph and kh, then take those readings and put them in the calculator here and you will have your CO2 level.

http://www.csd.net/~cgadd/aqua/art_plant_co2chart.htm

Or if you want to download the Windows version of the calculator, which also has all the other calculators for nutrient dosing, you can download it here.

http://www.csd.net/~cgadd/aqua/art_plant_aquacalc.htm

Even though it is the same planet, underwater is a whole different world.
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post #19 of 27 Old 03-02-2007, 02:22 PM
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CO2 and aeration

I'm looking to get CO2 to lower my PH and get some plants. If I keep using my air pump how will that affect the CO2 i want to put into the tank? Will it be a waste? Will i need to monitor when i use my air pump? i don't think the CO2 pump has a way to control how much. I don't have it yet. Don't know if store carries it or not.

http://www.petsmart.com/global/produ...=1172862553492

That's what i'm looking at. Thoughts???
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post #20 of 27 Old 03-02-2007, 02:34 PM
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Running and airstone during the day would defeat the purpose of having the CO2 injection. The surface disturbance would only gas off the extra CO2 and would diffuse a lot of the CO2.
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