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can I cram up my plants like this??

This is a discussion on can I cram up my plants like this?? within the Beginner Planted Aquarium forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> Blacklight is UV in the long range, what is termed UVA [Ultraviolet A] within the range of 400-315 nm [nanometres]. The UVB and UVC ...

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can I cram up my plants like this??
Old 05-10-2011, 05:26 PM   #31
 
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Blacklight is UV in the long range, what is termed UVA [Ultraviolet A] within the range of 400-315 nm [nanometres]. The UVB and UVC types of UV use shorter range and can cause skin damage such as cancer. The UVA does damage collagen fibres and destroys vitamins A and D in human skin. I'd bet it does something similar to fish.

Some aquarists use UV units to kill algae spores, pathogens, etc., so there is no doubt that anything UV is likely to be damaging to the aquarium inhabitants. Plants cannot use light in this nm range, but I've no idea if it may damage them.

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Old 05-10-2011, 06:53 PM   #32
 
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Blacklight is UV in the long range, what is termed UVA [Ultraviolet A] within the range of 400-315 nm [nanometres]. The UVB and UVC types of UV use shorter range and can cause skin damage such as cancer. The UVA does damage collagen fibres and destroys vitamins A and D in human skin. I'd bet it does something similar to fish.

Some aquarists use UV units to kill algae spores, pathogens, etc., so there is no doubt that anything UV is likely to be damaging to the aquarium inhabitants. Plants cannot use light in this nm range, but I've no idea if it may damage them.

Byron.
I think im just going to make this a friday thing istead of everyday. forty minutes one day a week cant be so bad right? I just love the way it looks but I dont know I really dont want to hurt the fish just for the look of it you know?
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Old 05-10-2011, 07:31 PM   #33
 
Well, it's ultimately your call leogtr, if you think your tank is thriving healthily then continue to do so once a week cautiously (maybe once a month if you read on). Afterall UV light is found naturally the second you step into the sun, the environment most plants live in. But the evidenced science shows that usually that a concentrated UV bulb will do damage. If you can determine the wavelength, it could help decipher how harmful it is. I'd imagine that if it is fairly close to the blue spectrum of light, that the UV effects wouldn't be as adverse. However, I will leave you with this - an experiment carried out in my microbiology course. We placed fresh bacterial cultures on petri dishes and placed them under a UV lightbox at several intervals of time and some with UV protection (IE a piece of paper to block the rays). The 5 minute exposure showed inhibited growth/death when compared to the control (no UV exposure). The 30 minute exposure showed little to no growth or nearly all bacteria decesed. I'd imagine a lenghty exposure would do the same to your beneficial nitrifying bacteria that maintains the nitrogen cycle in your tank. A healthy load of plants probably can balance this, but it is clearly risky to the long term health of the aquatic environment. So I'd limit it to once a month for pictures/showing off as well as any anti-pathogenic or anti-algae uses.
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Old 05-10-2011, 07:41 PM   #34
 
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Well, it's ultimately your call leogtr, if you think your tank is thriving healthily then continue to do so once a week cautiously (maybe once a month if you read on). Afterall UV light is found naturally the second you step into the sun, the environment most plants live in. But the evidenced science shows that usually that a concentrated UV bulb will do damage. If you can determine the wavelength, it could help decipher how harmful it is. I'd imagine that if it is fairly close to the blue spectrum of light, that the UV effects wouldn't be as adverse. However, I will leave you with this - an experiment carried out in my microbiology course. We placed fresh bacterial cultures on petri dishes and placed them under a UV lightbox at several intervals of time and some with UV protection (IE a piece of paper to block the rays). The 5 minute exposure showed inhibited growth/death when compared to the control (no UV exposure). The 30 minute exposure showed little to no growth or nearly all bacteria decesed. I'd imagine a lenghty exposure would do the same to your beneficial nitrifying bacteria that maintains the nitrogen cycle in your tank. A healthy load of plants probably can balance this, but it is clearly risky to the long term health of the aquatic environment. So I'd limit it to once a month for pictures/showing off as well as any anti-pathogenic or anti-algae uses.
your right once a month is okay thank you very much aqua Jon I really appreciate your imput and ofcourse everyone elses!!!
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Old 05-10-2011, 09:45 PM   #35
 
I doubt a over the tank bulb has enough power for anti-bacterial or anti-algae functions. UV steralizers that use the light for that function run the water extremely close to the bulb where it is the most intense. We know light looses intensity over distance, especially when traveling through water. You can't really say much of anything until you know the size and depth of tank and energy output and spectrum of the bulb, anything more is just speculating. IDK why the good bacteria would be effected in the first place since they are usually in the filter, which is often encased and would protect from the light...

I never knew UVA light damaged Vitamin D molecules... thats quite interesting IMO... The same molecule (vitamin D) that is synthesized from UVB light exposure. UVB can also be just as damaging or more so if there is too much of it.... thus sunblocks always block UVB light. Not all block UVA light though... UVA light is the same light you expose yourself too in a tanning bed.

Last edited by Mikaila31; 05-10-2011 at 10:05 PM..
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Old 05-10-2011, 11:50 PM   #36
 
Mikaila - I didn't think that bacteria significantly existed in the water column either, until I took a microbiology class. When we would prepare a liquid culture of a bacterial species we would only use - literally - the point of a pin's worth of stock culture. In a few days that once clear vial of water was now opaque with bacteria. So while bacteria are indeed safely living in the filter, the water of the tank, and gravel and everything else can be a site for bacteria, visible or not. I cannot speak to the exact effect it would have on the tank without doing a lot of calculations/experiment, but I know that the prolonged exposure would have an effect.
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Old 05-11-2011, 12:33 PM   #37
 
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Mikaila - I didn't think that bacteria significantly existed in the water column either, until I took a microbiology class. When we would prepare a liquid culture of a bacterial species we would only use - literally - the point of a pin's worth of stock culture. In a few days that once clear vial of water was now opaque with bacteria. So while bacteria are indeed safely living in the filter, the water of the tank, and gravel and everything else can be a site for bacteria, visible or not. I cannot speak to the exact effect it would have on the tank without doing a lot of calculations/experiment, but I know that the prolonged exposure would have an effect.
wow. What effect does actinic light have on the organisms in the aquarium?
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Old 05-11-2011, 12:39 PM   #38
 
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wow. What effect does actinic light have on the organisms in the aquarium?
Nothing negative that I am aware of other than plants; actinic is the normal lighting spectrum for marine reef tanks because it is conducive to the growth of coral. It is high in the blue end of the spectrum, like the sun penetrating the ocean, thus necessary for corals to grow.

Every planted tank author I've read says it is not good for planted freshwater tanks because of the colour/spectrum; the necessary red is missing (too weak) so plant growth is adversely affected, but the blue will promote algae in this situation. Marine algaes thrive in this actinic light.
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Old 05-11-2011, 12:42 PM   #39
 
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Nothing negative that I am aware of other than plants; actinic is the normal lighting spectrum for marine reef tanks because it is conducive to the growth of coral. It is high in the blue end of the spectrum, like the sun penetrating the ocean, thus necessary for corals to grow.

Every planted tank author I've read says it is not good for planted freshwater tanks because of the colour/spectrum; the necessary red is missing (too weak) so plant growth is adversely affected, but the blue will promote algae in this situation. Marine algaes thrive in this actinic light.
ohhhhhhh thank you Byron!!!
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Old 05-11-2011, 01:27 PM   #40
 
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Mikaila - I didn't think that bacteria significantly existed in the water column either, until I took a microbiology class. When we would prepare a liquid culture of a bacterial species we would only use - literally - the point of a pin's worth of stock culture. In a few days that once clear vial of water was now opaque with bacteria. So while bacteria are indeed safely living in the filter, the water of the tank, and gravel and everything else can be a site for bacteria, visible or not. I cannot speak to the exact effect it would have on the tank without doing a lot of calculations/experiment, but I know that the prolonged exposure would have an effect.
Yes I know bacteria is present in the water, it is present in most places to be fair including the air you breath.... Your beneficial bacteria though attach to a surface and that is generally in the filter... I mean if water-borne bacteria were really important for tank stability 50% water changes like I do weekly would cut those numbers in half... I doubt a UV light could have that big an effect. Unless your using a UV sterilizer with yeah does kill everything micro in the water(good and bad) and those tanks still maintain a stable cycle. I still put any effect up to speculation... I mean light intensity drops off very dramatically with distance.
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