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can I cram up my plants like this??

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can I cram up my plants like this??
Old 05-09-2011, 09:48 PM   #21
 
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I like this
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Old 05-09-2011, 10:02 PM   #22
 
yes very imformitive
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Old 05-09-2011, 10:09 PM   #23
 
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Question

so whats with blacklights? I have one and I use it for less than an hour a day at night. What effect does that give to the ecosystem? are they okay to use for a short period of time per day?
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Old 05-09-2011, 10:58 PM   #24
 
black lights are ultraviolet and they usually produce light around 370nm. It would provide some light for plants, but it is the exact opposite of a 'full spectrum' light. It will only stimulate certain pigments and thus photosynthesis will be much more reduced...

You can get very very in-depth with lights and growing plants. A bit too much IMO... I understand lux, lumens, PAR, kelvin temp, spectrum, ect, ect, ect.... there are so many parameters to judging light. IMO just go with what works best for you, because is all to easy to over complicate. Some people like to pick lights based on different aspects. I personally don't care about lux, lumen, or even kelvin temp as much as I do about color spectrum. Not all bulb makers are nice enough to give out color spectrums for their bulbs though, then I switch to kelvin temp alone. PAR is IMO the best way to measure light, but also the hardest even using only gathered data online its not easy to figure out what is best... I use to have some sites with PAR values bookmarked on my last hard drive. I simply perfer to use bulbs with a color spectrum that best matches the photosynthetic spectrum. Then weigh in other parameters to find a good zone I like. Suggesting a kelvin temp alone as the best is a very poor way (basically the 5500-6500 or whatever recommendation) kelvin temp does not equal spectrum at all. The two are only loosely linked. It comes down too the fact that two bulbs by different manufacturers with the same 6500K temp can be quite different in spectrum and every other variable including how well they grow plants....
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Old 05-10-2011, 01:37 AM   #25
 
I would like to chime in to as why a spectrum is important. I will quell much the science behind it, but happy to elaborate with some encouragement from the rest of ya. Each spectrum (color) of light corelates to a specific wavelength of energy. That specific energy can be used by the plants' energy producing organelles - chlorophyll. Most plants that are "green" contain a majority of chlorophyll-a and -b. These compounds convert the light energy via multiple chemical processes into biological energy called ATP. The light used by chlorophyll-a and -b is redish and purplish light. The only light energy that isnt really used is the green, but most bulbs have this spectrum so your plants look natural.

And for clarity, red is the most active color for human perception because it causes the most vibration of the cones embedded within the retina of the eye.
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Old 05-10-2011, 09:53 AM   #26
 
I am actually working on this in science
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Old 05-10-2011, 10:17 AM   #27
 
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I wouldn't use a blacklight... UV light is harmful to all living things.

Some flowers and fruits appear to grow better with UV exposure, but it's actually 'stressing' the plant which makes it flower.

Lemme guess- you have glow fish?
A Moon light should make them glow without quite as much UV.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Aqua Jon View Post
And for clarity, red is the most active color for human perception because it causes the most vibration of the cones embedded within the retina of the eye.
Most of your post is spot on, except for the clarity portion...
Red doesn't appear more vibrant, but it does create more vibration. Red light simply has more energy than blue light.

Or were you thinking that Red cones send more energy to the brain? If so, you're right... The cones that register greenish yellow, with wavelengths around 564 nm are called 'red cones'.

Byron Thanks for the lovely pics.

It's all very confusing... Plants will suffer and die without red spectrum light... But they don't need much since red light carries a lot of energy.. Plant growth LED fixtures (for terrestrial plants) show this, since they usually have blue and red LEDs in a 7:1 (or more) ratio. We still don't know what other spectrums do...
Green tends to make terrestrial plants grow taller, by triggering stretching... Some plants this is good (lettuce), some plants this is bad (fruit-producing plants)...
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Old 05-10-2011, 01:07 PM   #28
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redchigh View Post
I wouldn't use a blacklight... UV light is harmful to all living things.

Some flowers and fruits appear to grow better with UV exposure, but it's actually 'stressing' the plant which makes it flower.

Lemme guess- you have glow fish?
A Moon light should make them glow without quite as much UV.



Most of your post is spot on, except for the clarity portion...
Red doesn't appear more vibrant, but it does create more vibration. Red light simply has more energy than blue light.

Or were you thinking that Red cones send more energy to the brain? If so, you're right... The cones that register greenish yellow, with wavelengths around 564 nm are called 'red cones'.

Byron Thanks for the lovely pics.

It's all very confusing... Plants will suffer and die without red spectrum light... But they don't need much since red light carries a lot of energy.. Plant growth LED fixtures (for terrestrial plants) show this, since they usually have blue and red LEDs in a 7:1 (or more) ratio. We still don't know what other spectrums do...
Green tends to make terrestrial plants grow taller, by triggering stretching... Some plants this is good (lettuce), some plants this is bad (fruit-producing plants)...
yeah and it makes the aquarium look like a fishie night club



its only on for less than an hour a day

Last edited by leogtr; 05-10-2011 at 01:12 PM..
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Old 05-10-2011, 03:10 PM   #29
 
wow leogtr that is amazing! haha that looks so cool.
did you stick glow sticks in there? Redchigh is right, UV is harmful, I'd definitely be careful with the amount of time you use that light, even as little as 5 minutes can have a noticeable effect on microscopic cellular reproduction.

And as I know it energy and wavelength are inversely related, so a smaller wavelength like blue would have higher energy and red has a longer wavelength, therefore less energy. However, the way our eyes perceive red color causes the most attention through the vibration of the cones. This is why graphic designers use red color to draw your attention to an object. A true green color is graphically neutral. But I'm starting to feel I'm detracting from this thread's objective with this topic. I'd like to continue it in another thread or PM
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Old 05-10-2011, 03:19 PM   #30
 
that really does look really awesome.. but too bad its not good for the inhabitants...
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