Can anyone recommend me some good plant fertiliser?
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Beginner Freshwater Aquarium » Beginner Planted Aquarium » Can anyone recommend me some good plant fertiliser?

Can anyone recommend me some good plant fertiliser?

This is a discussion on Can anyone recommend me some good plant fertiliser? within the Beginner Planted Aquarium forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> I currently only have sand substrate in my tank, and T8 Bulbs. (Aqua-Glo & Power-Glo). (Along with some Albino Cory's). So I was wondering ...

Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
Can anyone recommend me some good plant fertiliser?
Old 07-17-2012, 07:25 AM   #1
 
Can anyone recommend me some good plant fertiliser?

I currently only have sand substrate in my tank, and T8 Bulbs.
(Aqua-Glo & Power-Glo).
(Along with some Albino Cory's).

So I was wondering if anyone could recommend me any plant fertiliser that could be used in my tank (I don't intend to have crustaceans)
- I don't intend to replace or up-heave my current substrate either.

My PH is 7, despite having relatively hard water.

I intend to get the following:

Taxiphyllum Barbieri

Taxiphyllum Barbieri Aquarium Plant Gel Pot

Staurogyne Repens

Staurogyne Repens Aquarium Plant Gel Pot

Myriophyllum Mattogrossense

Myriophyllum Mattogrossense Aquarium Plant Gel Pot

I was looking at liquid fertiliser, but didn't know if the Carbon in my Filter would just remove it.

- Thanks

I've been looking at these

http://www.seapets.co.uk/products/aq...ish-250ml.html

http://www.seapets.co.uk/products/aq...h-tabs-10.html

Last edited by Dawes; 07-17-2012 at 07:40 AM..
Dawes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2012, 10:51 AM   #2
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Yes, carbon dfiltration will remove nutrients, along with other useful substances like DOC (dissolved organic carbon) which is an essential macro-nutrient and usually the one in shortest supply to begin with. I would remove the carbon, and any other chemical filtration media. The plants can do all this better anyway, but they will be hampered if they are being starved of essential nutrients.

I use Seachem Flourish products, namely the liquid Flourish Comprehensive Supplement in all tanks, and the Flourish Tabs in two tanks with the large Echinodorus (sword) plants.

The liquid is essential and will feed all plants, be they substrate-rooted, rooted on wood/rock, stem or floating. Depending upon your GH and fish load [the two primary natural sources of plant nutrients], in balance with the plant load, once or twice weekly dosing.

The substrate tabs will not benefit the plants mentioned except perhaps for Staurogyne repens; I have not yet found this plant, so I've no personal experience with its requirements nutrient-wise.

I can say that in my experience, all plants will grow fine with just a comprehensive liquid fertilizer, but substrate tabs do provide increased growth in substrate-rooted plants that are heavy feeders (such as the swords).

Byron.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2012, 11:36 AM   #3
 
Hey, Byron, thanks for the help.

I was just curious, would the plants mentioned have any trouble growing in just sand substrate? (I -don't- have any nutrient soil under my sand)
I'm also going to buy some Seacheam Liquid flourish too now that you use it yourself and have good results!

Here are the plants that I am thinking about getting once again for you:
Taxiphyllum barbieri
Staurogyne Repens
Myriophyllum Mattogrossense
Eleocharis Parvula

(Cant decide between Eleocharis Parvula and Staurogyne Repens since they are both carpet type plants, so I doubt I'll be buying both, but if you know of any Pros and Cons that you could tell me about for either ones, that would be awesome!).
Are there any cons with using carpet plants? Do they hold alot of debris which might cause the Ammonia to rise?
Dawes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2012, 11:42 AM   #4
 
So dont use carbon in planted tanks?? I have an aquaclear 70.
bohmert is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2012, 11:47 AM   #5
 
It depends.

If you have a nutrient rich soil (the stuff that goes at the bottom of your tank under sand or gravel) you shouldn't use Carbon (Chemical) filtration since the Carbon removes all the nutrients and 'beneficial chemicals' in the water.
This is the same for Liquid Fertilisers too (For people who want an extra boost, or for people who have low lighting/too little Carbon dioxide in their tanks, or for people who have alot of plants in their aquarium).

Now on the other hand, if you're talking about Carbon Dioxide diffusers/canisters, not -all- plants 'need' them, but they do alot better with them. - It just depends on how much oxygenation and fish you have in the tank along side the plants (Since -all- air-pumps cause gaseous exchange and get rid of alot of the Carbon Dioxide in the water, which is somewhat bad for plants, but good for fish) - Which is why alot of people who have plants in their tanks don't turn their air pumps up too high, as far as I am aware.

(Don't quote me on that however, I am no expert on such things and have probably mentioned something inaccurately).
Dawes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2012, 11:49 AM   #6
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawes View Post
Hey, Byron, thanks for the help.

I was just curious, would the plants mentioned have any trouble growing in just sand substrate? (I -don't- have any nutrient soil under my sand)
I'm also going to buy some Seacheam Liquid flourish too now that you use it yourself and have good results!

Here are the plants that I am thinking about getting once again for you:
Taxiphyllum barbieri
Staurogyne Repens
Myriophyllum Mattogrossense
Eleocharis Parvula

(Cant decide between Eleocharis Parvula and Staurogyne Repens since they are both carpet type plants, so I doubt I'll be buying both, but if you know of any Pros and Cons that you could tell me about for either ones, that would be awesome!).
Are there any cons with using carpet plants? Do they hold alot of debris which might cause the Ammonia to rise?
Sand is fine for any plants. As I mentioned previously, substrate enrichment will improve the growth of substrate-rooted plants to some extent, depending upon the plant species. But all plant nutrients must enter the water in order to be taken up via roots or leaves, so adding fertilizer to the water will get to the roots in the substrate as the water percolates through the substrate. I have plain sand in 5 tanks, plain gravel in 1, and Flourite in another. The plants with the Flourite substrate are the worst of the lot. I will be changing this out for playsand this month.

I don't like true "carpet" plants, and I wold never get Eleocharis parvula [just me]. I like to see some substrate, and for fish like corys and loaches this is important. I have pygmy chain sword and chain sword as pseudo-carpet plants, and crypts. This is as much "carpet" as i get. I will try the Staurogyne repens if I can get it.

Byron.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What fertiliser? Welsh Beginner Planted Aquarium 7 09-11-2010 05:21 PM
fertiliser ?? southafrica1001 Beginner Planted Aquarium 23 09-07-2008 01:07 AM
fertiliser jb92 Beginner Planted Aquarium 19 03-25-2007 06:43 AM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:49 PM.