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bubbles?

This is a discussion on bubbles? within the Beginner Planted Aquarium forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> Originally Posted by Byron Given your info, these bubbles are probably CO2 from the tap water. In new tanks (for a few days sometimes) ...

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Old 04-02-2011, 11:50 AM   #11
 
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Originally Posted by Byron View Post
Given your info, these bubbles are probably CO2 from the tap water. In new tanks (for a few days sometimes) and after water changes, I have bubbles everywhere. I would not expect pearling from plants in low-tech setups.
Okay thanks Byron I was just wondering what they were doing? It didn't start untill about day after adding the plants and I haven't noticed it at all today
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Old 04-02-2011, 06:37 PM   #12
 
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Originally Posted by leogtr View Post
what is considered a high tech aquarium home Mr. Byron?
First, please understand I'm not presuming to answer for Byron! If/when Byron replies, please consider his reply as the more authoritative answer!

It's my understanding that a "high-tech" tank is one that specifically maximizes plant growth by utilizing high/very high light levels, pressurized CO2 gas injected into the tank (with all the equipment that requires), as well as calculated dosing of macronutrients and micronutrients into the tank. "High tech" has a higher rate of plant growth, but also higher maintenance. It's possible to overdo the CO2 and kill the fish if it's not monitored properly.
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Old 04-02-2011, 08:51 PM   #13
 
Yeah thats high tech. There isn't a exact line drawn for what is low and what is high tech. Pressurized CO2 is always considered high tech though, along with adding lots of various dry fertilizers daily that look a lot like illegal drugs lol.

As far as low tech, it is certainly possible to pearl plants in these tanks. Its not as excessive action as you would see in a high tech tank, but its still pearling.
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Old 04-02-2011, 10:00 PM   #14
 
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Originally Posted by DKRST View Post
First, please understand I'm not presuming to answer for Byron! If/when Byron replies, please consider his reply as the more authoritative answer!

It's my understanding that a "high-tech" tank is one that specifically maximizes plant growth by utilizing high/very high light levels, pressurized CO2 gas injected into the tank (with all the equipment that requires), as well as calculated dosing of macronutrients and micronutrients into the tank. "High tech" has a higher rate of plant growth, but also higher maintenance. It's possible to overdo the CO2 and kill the fish if it's not monitored properly.
oh really oh my goodness who would want to risk their little fishies well-being for overaccelerated plant growth thats just not necessary if you ask me

I have no co2 system and the plants that I have are growing faster than I really want them to grow..Im going to run out of room very soon


thank you for the very detailed answer that was helpful:)
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Old 04-02-2011, 10:38 PM   #15
 
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oh really oh my goodness who would want to risk their little fishies well-being for overaccelerated plant growth thats just not necessary if you ask me
I have no co2 system and the plants that I have are growing faster than I really want them to grow..Im going to run out of room very soon
thank you for the very detailed answer that was helpful:)
My pleasure to answer the question. I do see the attraction of planted aquascapes, it's a neat aspect of the hobby. However, fish are my primary focus, although I'd classify my 55 gallon as a "medium" tech attempt. I won't divert this thread with details, but it's been fun trying it so far - still learning!
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Old 04-02-2011, 10:51 PM   #16
 
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Originally Posted by DKRST View Post
My pleasure to answer the question. I do see the attraction of planted aquascapes, it's a neat aspect of the hobby. However, fish are my primary focus, although I'd classify my 55 gallon as a "medium" tech attempt. I won't divert this thread with details, but it's been fun trying it so far - still learning!
I really like the look of a well planted aquarium! My main focus is the fish though just think a planted tank looks more like a habitat for the fish then a nonplanted tank but that's just my opinion though
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Old 04-02-2011, 11:07 PM   #17
 
lol I do.

Its hard to kill fish with CO2 though. It almost has to be intentional IMO. My paintball system was doing a end-of-tank dump for a couple days straight recently. Was injecting like 4 times as much as normal. I'm kinda surprised it didn't just blow the diffuser off the line given the bubble counter rate. I eventually tweaked it on the third day. Its not like CO2 suddenly kills your fish. It suffocates them if it gets too high. Its quite easily monitored/controlled if set up properly. You really have to ignore it to kill fish. I normally don't interfere with the dumps. My diffuser was being very loud. Fish tend to move higher up in the tank so they are close to the surface and they might gasp at the surface occasionally. Its a long way from dying though. Your shrimp will be running round like crazy, trying to climbing out of water, and dying before your fish do. All fish will hyperventilating at the surface before they die. Its quite obvious... and easily corrected.

End-of-tank dumps happen when the CO2 tank is almost empty, pressure drops too low for the regulator to regulate so your inline pressure spikes, and the amount of CO2 injected jumps. It can only happen for so long though before the tank is empty. High quality equipment can avoid end-of-tank dumps entirely. The amount of CO2 injected is set and remains constant for a couple months before it will do a dump then need to be refilled. I accidentally kill a ton of cherry shrimp with it once, I turned it up and didn't check it for about a week. Killed 80% of my entire stock in one of my high tech tanks with a piece of wood once too. That took 24 hours.
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Old 04-03-2011, 12:48 AM   #18
 
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Originally Posted by Mikaila31 View Post
lol I do.

Its hard to kill fish with CO2 though. It almost has to be intentional IMO. My paintball system was doing a end-of-tank dump for a couple days straight recently. Was injecting like 4 times as much as normal. I'm kinda surprised it didn't just blow the diffuser off the line given the bubble counter rate. I eventually tweaked it on the third day. Its not like CO2 suddenly kills your fish. It suffocates them if it gets too high. Its quite easily monitored/controlled if set up properly. You really have to ignore it to kill fish. I normally don't interfere with the dumps. My diffuser was being very loud. Fish tend to move higher up in the tank so they are close to the surface and they might gasp at the surface occasionally. Its a long way from dying though. Your shrimp will be running round like crazy, trying to climbing out of water, and dying before your fish do. All fish will hyperventilating at the surface before they die. Its quite obvious... and easily corrected.

End-of-tank dumps happen when the CO2 tank is almost empty, pressure drops too low for the regulator to regulate so your inline pressure spikes, and the amount of CO2 injected jumps. It can only happen for so long though before the tank is empty. High quality equipment can avoid end-of-tank dumps entirely. The amount of CO2 injected is set and remains constant for a couple months before it will do a dump then need to be refilled. I accidentally kill a ton of cherry shrimp with it once, I turned it up and didn't check it for about a week. Killed 80% of my entire stock in one of my high tech tanks with a piece of wood once too. That took 24 hours.
thats sounds complicated and totally unnecessary IMO my question is why would you want to spend your money and time trying to keep up with a system that not only puts your fish at risk but is also unnecessary considering that plant growth will be plentiful in a low-tech aquarium?
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Old 04-03-2011, 02:14 AM   #19
 
I do it elevated growth rate mainly. In summer I sell plants from weekly trimmings. It pays for the basic up keep costs of my tanks. Most though do it to keep more difficult species of plants that need high light. That high light must be balanced with high nutrients. CO2 is used to supply the carbon demands on the tank. This is because there are fish keepers in this hobby, then there are plant keepers. Ever been to a aquatic plant forum? Its like a fish forum but opposite, a dozen or more sections for plants, 1 for fish. For some the plants are more important then the fish. For me it depends exactly which fish or plant we are talking about... O I know its crazy complicated system for just growing a bunch of plants, most realize this. I fail though to see the risk... I've yet to kill a fish with pressurized CO2. I'm almost certain excel kills more fish and inverts than CO2.

There is the possibility I will not be able to have my tanks in a couple months when I move out. My 55 will stay with my 2 eels and 6 garras at home if need be. There are 50-60 other fish I don't honestly mind giving up. I need another tank set up though, cuz there are some plants I'd rather not have to hunt down and try to replace in a year and they won't work in the 55.
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Old 04-03-2011, 10:37 AM   #20
 
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Different strokes for different folks! It's all about enjoying the hobby, no right or wrong .
Folks feel very strongly both ways high/low. I'm somewhere in the middle. I do enjoy the plants and the fish, I don't mind using supplementary chemicals, but I'm not comfortable using pressurized CO2 - yet.

If you like what you are doing with your tanks, it's working for you, then go for it !

Mikaila31 - yes, moving is a pain but opens new doors also, you have my empathy in advance (been there, done that 8 times)!
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