Bought set-up planted tank. NPT? - Page 2 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #11 of 34 Old 04-28-2013, 09:10 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you! Straight out of the tap, my GH is 0 (we have a water softener), and my KH is 240, or as high as the test goes.
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post #12 of 34 Old 04-28-2013, 09:29 PM Thread Starter
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I bought some of these injectable fertilizer tabs from aquariumplants.com last week when I bought some plants for my betta tanks. Are they any good, or should I just dump them and buy the API?
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post #13 of 34 Old 04-29-2013, 01:57 AM
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I'd recommend seachem... never heard of aqua ferts... can u type up/ take photo of the table that tells you what you have in that bottle?
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post #14 of 34 Old 04-29-2013, 08:39 AM Thread Starter
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Unfortunately, I didn't keep the leaflet that came with the package. From the website, though, these are the ingredients:

Chemically Active Ingredients: Hydrated Magnesium sulfate, Potassium nitrate, Potassium sulfate, also trace amounts of; Cobalt EDTA, Copper EDTA, Iron EDTA, Magnesium EDTA, Zinc EDTA, Manganese sulfate, Sodium Borate, Sodium Molybdate, (Chelating Agent: Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid)


Physically Active Ingredients: Calcium Carbonate (CaCO3) Magnesium Carbonate (MgCO3) Calcium Carbonate Equivalent (CaCO3) Calcium Sulfate (CaSO42H2O)
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post #15 of 34 Old 04-29-2013, 10:50 AM
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IMHO the difference between a natural plants tank and a "regular" planted tank is more of how it is maintained not how it was originally setup.

(besides my "regular" planted tanks are natural because that's the way I maintain them.)

My tanks are basically the fish, plants, water, lights, and substrate. And nothing else. One tank is on the back porch and has no lights.

I balance them out with plants then do no water changes and keep the tank clear by adjusting lights and feeding.

I have found that some peat moss in the substrate at startup helps keep kh and gh in line and is better for neons.

By contrates some use added Carbon dioxide, fertz and do massive weekly water changes.

Just not for me.


and as always my .02

maintain Fw and marine system with a strong emphasis on balanced, stabilized system that as much as possible are self substaning.

have maintained FW systems for up to 9 years with descendants from original fish and marine aquariums for up to 8 years.

With no water changes, untreated tap water, inexpensive lighting by first starting the tank with live plants (FW) or macro algae( marine)

see: http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/a...-build-295530/
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post #16 of 34 Old 04-29-2013, 11:01 AM
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Quote:
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Thank you! Straight out of the tap, my GH is 0 (we have a water softener), and my KH is 240, or as high as the test goes.
I think that is going to be a problem long term for you. Do you have a tap that doesn't go through the softener? If so, you'd be better to use it as I presume that the water is coming from a well and will have some hardness (GH) that will be needed for the plants... that and softened water is just not good for plants or fish if I recall.

I assume that you are using test strips if that is the maximum, the liquid KH/GH test lets you measure well past the charts... I have a 23dGH from my tap which is over 400ppm.

Jeff.


Total years fish keeping experience: 7 months, can't start counting in years for a while yet.

The shotgun approach to a planted tank with an LED fixture

Small scale nitrogen cycle with a jar, water and fish food; no substrate, filter etc
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post #17 of 34 Old 04-29-2013, 11:09 AM Thread Starter
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I have a liquid master test kit, but it didn't include GH and KH, so I used a strip for that, yes. If the KH is high, does that not help?
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post #18 of 34 Old 04-29-2013, 11:21 AM
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I have a liquid master test kit, but it didn't include GH and KH, so I used a strip for that, yes. If the KH is high, does that not help?
It's not the same. Typically softening is done due to unusually hard water and the hardness from Calcium and Magnesium is replaced with Sodium (more or less) so the harder the water was, the higher the KH will be.

GH is the value referred to when keeping fish and plants and will always be higher than the KH anyway so KH typically is of no concern... except in softened water and a couple of other cases perhaps.

I think our hard water has a 14ppm Sodium which was flagged by our tester as high... if your softened water is off the charts it is at least 200ppm+. You shouldn't be drinking it either. Some water must not go through the softener, perhaps an outside hose even?

The GH/KH test kist is probably under $10 and is worth it even if only to test the water once... it also has no maximum range as you just count the drops.

Jeff.


Total years fish keeping experience: 7 months, can't start counting in years for a while yet.

The shotgun approach to a planted tank with an LED fixture

Small scale nitrogen cycle with a jar, water and fish food; no substrate, filter etc
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post #19 of 34 Old 04-29-2013, 12:43 PM
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I agree, you have an issue with GH, and the softener.

Can you use water that does not go through the softener? The problem with most (I won't say all) softeners is that they lower the hard mineral salts (calcium, magnesium, etc) by using other salts like sodium, and the end result is just as bad if not worse for fish.

Aside from the above (which is a major issue) is the GH which has to be no less than 4 dGH in order to provide sufficient hard minerals for the plants.

I have near-zero GH in my tap water naturally, and while my soft water fish (which is all I keep since they suit the water perfectly) thrive in this, my plants do not. I raise the GH to 5 dGH or 6 dGH depending upon the tank.

Can you use the water pre-softener? And if so, can you tell us the GH of that? If you are on a municipal water system, the GH should be posted on their website, or they can tell you. We should get this number before considering options.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #20 of 34 Old 04-30-2013, 11:45 AM Thread Starter
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We have well water. I used the test strips on water that hadn't gone through the softener yet, and both the GH and KH were as high as the test goes. :-/
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