black algae from ludwigia leaves - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #1 of 7 Old 11-29-2012, 02:44 PM Thread Starter
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black algae from ludwigia leaves

My Ludwiga plant has developed black deposits that look like soot. 3 Algae eaters won't remove it. Also green spots on tree stump ornament. 74 Degree water, 8 Platty 11 Frye. One blue white bulb, one sunglow on for 14 hours, fertilize with floral pride weekly.
Change water daily, tank not cycled, nitrite high,ammonia O, hard water.,tank has been inhabited for 25 days.
How do I remove algae do I remove from tank to clean? Gravel substrate, 20 gallon.
Am getting the API test for better parameters.:oops
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post #2 of 7 Old 11-29-2012, 03:53 PM
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Hey gi gi. I am no expert. Trust me I'm still learning. Firstly I would get the tank cycled first before moving on to the next problem. In my opinion I would reduce lighting to ten hours a day and stop fertilising. As the tank is cycling I might assume that there is too much nutrients ( ammonia, nitrite, and nitrates) on top of that the ferts+light. This giving the algae a chance to grow before your plants can assimilate. There are a whole lot of stickies that might shed some more light on the problem.

Slow and steady will win the race. But keep the water changes up if for any reason other than fish health.

Goodluck

TitanTDH
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post #3 of 7 Old 11-29-2012, 07:19 PM
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Titan is quite correct in the matter of algae in new tanks. The unstable water conditions can work to the advantage of algae when plants are still struggling to get established.

However, the light here is an issue, and this is not going to fix itself even when the tank is established. Two T8 tubes over a 20g will likely need a shorter duration to keep algae from increasing. And brush algae which is actually a red algae though it usually looks black, and it grows in tufts of varying lengths, is almost always due to light intensity/duration.

Plants grow by photosynthesis, and in order to photosynthesize full out they need sufficient light intensity and 17 nutrients. As soon as one of these is insufficient, photosynthesis slows and may stop altogether. This is when algae takes advantage. We refer to this as the limiting factor to plant growth, and in natural or low-tech planted tanks the light should always be the limiting factor; if light continues after some nutrients are used up, plants can't use it but algae will as it is not as fussy.

I would reduce the light down to 10 hours, and be prepared to go further if needed. At the same time, you need to ensure that all nutrients are available, and here we come to the fertilizer Flora Pride. This contains potassium and iron, but according to the ingredients nothing else. While it is true that nutrients occur from fish foods and tap water, the levels may not be sufficient for the plants. My choice for a good complete liquid fertilizer is Seachem's Flourish Comprehensive Supplement. Another is Brightwell Aquatics' FlorinMulti. With either, you use very little once or twice a week, so long-term they are not expensive.

Almost forgot; brush algae is an algae that nothing will eat, except one or two species of fish, and they get too large for a 20g. So controlling brush algae naturally is necessary. Removing this from plants is next to impossible without tearing off the leaves. If the algae is taking over a leaf, it is best to remove the entire leaf. But once the light/nutrients are in balance, brush algae should stop increasing.

Byron.
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Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]

Last edited by Byron; 11-29-2012 at 07:22 PM.
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post #4 of 7 Old 11-29-2012, 10:46 PM Thread Starter
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Titan is quite correct in the matter of algae in new tanks. The unstable water conditions can work to the advantage of algae when plants are still struggling to get established.

However, the light here is an issue, and this is not going to fix itself even when the tank is established. Two T8 tubes over a 20g will likely need a shorter duration to keep algae from increasing. And brush algae which is actually a red algae though it usually looks black, and it grows in tufts of varying lengths, is almost always due to light intensity/duration.

Plants grow by photosynthesis, and in order to photosynthesize full out they need sufficient light intensity and 17 nutrients. As soon as one of these is insufficient, photosynthesis slows and may stop altogether. This is when algae takes advantage. We refer to this as the limiting factor to plant growth, and in natural or low-tech planted tanks the light should always be the limiting factor; if light continues after some nutrients are used up, plants can't use it but algae will as it is not as fussy.

I would reduce the light down to 10 hours, and be prepared to go further if needed. At the same time, you need to ensure that all nutrients are available, and here we come to the fertilizer Flora Pride. This contains potassium and iron, but according to the ingredients nothing else. While it is true that nutrients occur from fish foods and tap water, the levels may not be sufficient for the plants. My choice for a good complete liquid fertilizer is Seachem's Flourish Comprehensive Supplement. Another is Brightwell Aquatics' FlorinMulti. With either, you use very little once or twice a week, so long-term they are not expensive.

Almost forgot; brush algae is an algae that nothing will eat, except one or two species of fish, and they get too large for a 20g. So controlling brush algae naturally is necessary. Removing this from plants is next to impossible without tearing off the leaves. If the algae is taking over a leaf, it is best to remove the entire leaf. But once the light/nutrients are in balance, brush algae should stop increasing.

Byron.
Thank you for the help will cut off the leaves.The lights are now off. Seachem comprehensive fertilizer that aquatic critter sold me contained copper- found that out after my bamboo shrimp died twp days after molting and we assumed it was the copper. Will stop all and just do my water changes to finally get cycle established- who knew this is so hard.
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post #5 of 7 Old 11-30-2012, 11:32 AM
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Thank you for the help will cut off the leaves.The lights are now off. Seachem comprehensive fertilizer that aquatic critter sold me contained copper- found that out after my bamboo shrimp died twp days after molting and we assumed it was the copper. Will stop all and just do my water changes to finally get cycle established- who knew this is so hard.
It is highly unlikely the copper killed the shrimp. Unless the Flourish is overdosed, there is not enough copper in it to do any harm. I would look to other possibilities for the shrimp loss. Here, more likely the cycling. But no mention is made of your tap water parameters, do you know the GH (general hardness)? You can ascertain this from the water supply people, they probably have a website. GH is the indicator of the "hard" minerals like calcium and magnesium, and calcium particularly is essential for the exoskeleton of shrimp and other crustaceans.

Dose the Flourish Comp once a week, the plants need food and they will begin to fail if they don't get it, and algae will be even worse. Plants can use the light but only if nutrients are available, otherwise algae has the advantage again.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #6 of 7 Old 12-02-2012, 05:34 PM
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I can attest to that personally. Although I do not have a Bamboo shrimp in my tank, I dose Flourish comp weekly and my Amank shrimp have been fine.

It may be that your water didn't have enough nutrients in it forthe bamboo shrimp.. they are filter feeders so they get eeverything from the water column. Being a new tank your water might not have enough in it? Was it picking at the substrate or still trying to filter feed?
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post #7 of 7 Old 12-02-2012, 09:13 PM Thread Starter
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I can attest to that personally. Although I do not have a Bamboo shrimp in my tank, I dose Flourish comp weekly and my Amank shrimp have been fine.

It may be that your water didn't have enough nutrients in it forthe bamboo shrimp.. they are filter feeders so they get eeverything from the water column. Being a new tank your water might not have enough in it? Was it picking at the substrate or still trying to filter feed?
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Thanks Jennesque,
Every ones advice is pretty much the same and on target. Lot to learn! I am following advise and changing water daily.Algae has stopped but not disappeared. Happily the Frye are thriving as well as adults.
One of the shrimp,first to molt and die was very active,climbing and exploring, filters always active. The other hid and filter fans always tight to body.I am waiting till tank is stable to get new shrimp.Plants are growing, all low light.
Love your dog!
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