best type of lighting for aquarium plants - Page 2 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #11 of 13 Old 11-13-2012, 05:09 PM
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Is there any chance you could give us a link to some online information about the light you now have?

The plants you mention are moderate and low light requiring, and they seem to be OK. Are the ones that are not doing well by any chance stem plants? These usually need more light, but this means more nutrients as well to balance.

We have plants in our profiles under the second tab from the left in the blue bar across the top. You might find some of yours there, we have photos of each species in the profile.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #12 of 13 Old 11-13-2012, 05:20 PM Thread Starter
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its a 65w 50/50 power compact. so probably 10k-20k.
just started a DIY CO2 reactor so that might help.
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post #13 of 13 Old 11-13-2012, 06:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tankman12 View Post
its a 65w 50/50 power compact. so probably 10k-20k.
just started a DIY CO2 reactor so that might help.
May or may not. It depends upon the light and nutrient balance. Most aquarium plants, with the exception of very few such as some of the substrate carpet types, will grow fine if they have sufficient light intensity and available nutrients, without additional CO2. They may be slow in growth, but they will grow. The natural CO2 in most tanks is more than some realize. Once the balance between light and nutrients is reached, increasing any one component will not make any difference to the plants if something else is lacking--but algae can take advantage.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]

Last edited by Byron; 11-13-2012 at 06:20 PM.
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