Attaching Anubias Nana
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Attaching Anubias Nana

This is a discussion on Attaching Anubias Nana within the Beginner Planted Aquarium forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> I saw a video on you tube (search: attaching anubias clay) where all but about 1/2" to 1" of the plants roots were cut ...

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Attaching Anubias Nana
Old 01-01-2012, 02:56 PM   #1
 
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Attaching Anubias Nana

I saw a video on you tube (search: attaching anubias clay) where all but about 1/2" to 1" of the plants roots were cut off before attaching. Is this correct or should the current root structure of the anubias be left in place?

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Trapperwolves
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Old 01-01-2012, 08:44 PM   #2
 
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I would like to know this also, so I'll check back.
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Old 01-01-2012, 10:10 PM   #3
 
Anubias draws its nutrients directly from the water column and therefor can be attached to anything. I attach mine to driftwood with thread. Before attaching it I always clip the long roots down. This will not harm the plant as long as the rhizome is intact. The rhizomes can be cut with a sharp, sterile pair of scissors to divide the plant. These plants grow very slowly do don't be surprised if you don't notice it getting bigger. It is healthy as long as it is solid green and the leaves are rigid.
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Old 01-02-2012, 01:13 AM   #4
 
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My Anubia are tied to wood with fishing line but roots have found their way to substrate.
I don't trim the roots.

As long as roots are greenish/white looking as opposed to brown/black,, the plant is thriving.(In my view)
I have other tanks with Aunbia's that has been stuck through holes drilled into wood pieces, and I place the root side down and roots have grown into the substrate.
I believe they can take nutrient's from both the water and the substrate if given opportunity.
Haven't moved these plant's in over a year, and keep them out of direct light which works well for me.
My sister has shrimp tank with Anubia 's planted in substrate but Rhizome left above same, and her plant's thrive as well.
Go figure.

Last edited by 1077; 01-02-2012 at 01:16 AM..
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Old 01-02-2012, 01:22 PM   #5
 
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I have seen some very heated discussions elsewhere about trimming the roots of plants. Provided it is not severe, it should not be detrimental. And it may invigorate the plant. As a terrestrial gardener, I have frequently been told to trim the roots of potted garden plants when planting them, simply to invigorate the plant to start growing. Several planted tank authors recommend trimming roots when first planting, or moving, aquarium plants. I have rarely done this, except with some very large Echinodorus when I move them to remove some of the very extensive roots. I would suggest that either method seems to have no problems.

Healthy plant roots of substrate-rooted plants, stem plants and most floating plants will be white. Brown and soft roots are dead or dying and when noticed (as when moving or first planting the plant) can/should be removed. Roots on plants like Anubias and Java Fern are dark, black basically. These will grow down into the substrate given opportunity.

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Old 01-02-2012, 03:30 PM   #6
 
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Thanks for your responses and help.
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Old 01-03-2012, 01:25 AM   #7
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
I have seen some very heated discussions elsewhere about trimming the roots of plants. Provided it is not severe, it should not be detrimental. And it may invigorate the plant. As a terrestrial gardener, I have frequently been told to trim the roots of potted garden plants when planting them, simply to invigorate the plant to start growing. Several planted tank authors recommend trimming roots when first planting, or moving, aquarium plants. I have rarely done this, except with some very large Echinodorus when I move them to remove some of the very extensive roots. I would suggest that either method seems to have no problems.

Healthy plant roots of substrate-rooted plants, stem plants and most floating plants will be white. Brown and soft roots are dead or dying and when noticed (as when moving or first planting the plant) can/should be removed. Roots on plants like Anubias and Java Fern are dark, black basically. These will grow down into the substrate given opportunity.

Byron.

Byron,, and with apologies to original poster . As stated, the roots on the Anubias I have are as mentioned white to greenish white as opposed to black as you indicate but I also add a bit of dry fertilizer each week (KNO3,KH2PO4) Perhaps this is reason for what I believe to be healthier color of roots?
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