api co2 booster - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
 1Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 16 Old 01-27-2012, 08:09 PM Thread Starter
New Member
 
api co2 booster

I was just wondering if anyone has used api co2 booster with good results? I don't have a pressurized system and quite honestly don't want one, for the time being anyways. I have a medium amount of plants. Would I just be waisting my time trying this or would it be worth using daily?
arscott82 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 16 Old 01-27-2012, 09:06 PM
Member
 
DKRST's Avatar
 
Don't know much about the API brand, but the active ingredient is similar to the ingredient in Flourish Excel. Using the chemical, your plant growth will increase by as much as 4x the "normal" growth rate.
I used it for about a year with good results on most plants. Compared to setting up a DIY or pressurized CO2 system, it's cheap. It will harm a few plants, notably Egeria densa (Elodea), and Vals. The chemical also has some anti-algae properties. It's not a really person-friendly chemical, so you want to avoid skin contact and don't be tempted to "sniff" the bottle. It's not good for the lungs!

Would I use it again? Probably, if I stopped using pressurized CO2 in the tank I formerly used Excel in - but that tank has rather high lighting! I have three other planted tanks and I don't bother using Excel or pressurized CO2 in those tanks. Do you need it, no. Is it helpful, yes, if you want slightly faster plant growth.

18 species/varieties of fish, 15 species/varieties of plants - The fish are finally ahead of the plants!
*560 gallons (2120 liters) in 5 tanks -> you do the math.
DKRST is offline  
post #3 of 16 Old 01-28-2012, 08:59 AM Thread Starter
New Member
 
How about the look of the plants. Other than helping the plants grow quicker, does it make your plants look healthier? I think I'm going to try a bottle and see if I notice any difference. One other quick thing here, does it have any bad effects on any fish?
arscott82 is offline  
post #4 of 16 Old 01-28-2012, 04:26 PM
Member
 
DKRST's Avatar
 
No noticeable impact on fish at recommended dosing. It won't make plants "healthier", but they will grow somewhat faster and you can potentially sneak the light intensity up (just a little bit) if you dose the chemical. Increasing light intensity, not duration may cause additional colors to show in some plants, but you start running the risk of algae also.

18 species/varieties of fish, 15 species/varieties of plants - The fish are finally ahead of the plants!
*560 gallons (2120 liters) in 5 tanks -> you do the math.
DKRST is offline  
post #5 of 16 Old 01-28-2012, 04:26 PM
Member
 
Byron's Avatar
 
First thing, welcome to Tropical Fish Keeping forum.

Although I have not used these liquid carbon products, I have researched them. I have no intention of using them, due to not only the detrimental issues DKRST mentioned but also not finding it necessary.

On the first issue with respect to fish, it depends. Chemical substances that kill some plants, cause skin irritation, etc. are not in my view something to put into an aquarium with fish. Obviously these products if overdosed will kill fish. Not that one would likely overdose to that extent, but the point is that it has that capability.

On the second issue, plants require light and 17 nutrients to photosynthesize. These have to be balanced, and plants will photosynthesize full out up to the point where something is no longer available. The rate of growth depends upon the level of this balance. With minimal (but sufficient) light and all nutrients, growth will be healthy and steady, but usually slower. With more light and provided all nutrients are increased in balance, growth will usually be faster.

The aquarist can decide what he/she expects in the way of plant growth, and then provide sufficient light and nutrients to achieve that. If there are fish in the aquarium, they must be considered with respect to all this, as fish are affected by light to varying degrees.

Providing all nutrients are available and balanced to the light (intensity and duration), plant growth will be as healthy as it can be, but slower (though not always). There is probably more CO2 produced in most aquaria than one might realize; I prefer relying on this natural CO2 rather than adding either CO2 or carbon via chemicals.

Byron.
MMAfish35 likes this.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
Byron is offline  
post #6 of 16 Old 01-28-2012, 04:50 PM Thread Starter
New Member
 
Cool, thanks for the info on that. As you did see I am new to this and this is actually my first tank. I have been reading up a little on all this, but I'll be the first to admit that I have a lot of learning left to do. One thing that I think will help me out is if I start with beginner plants and not the high dollar "look real nice in the pic" plants. I appreciate all the help with this. Thanks again.

Adam
arscott82 is offline  
post #7 of 16 Old 01-28-2012, 05:19 PM
Member
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by arscott82 View Post
Cool, thanks for the info on that. As you did see I am new to this and this is actually my first tank. I have been reading up a little on all this, but I'll be the first to admit that I have a lot of learning left to do. One thing that I think will help me out is if I start with beginner plants and not the high dollar "look real nice in the pic" plants. I appreciate all the help with this. Thanks again.

Adam
If you haven't seen it already, there is a 4-part series entitled A Basic Approach to the Natural Planted Aquarium stickied at the head of this section, in which I tried to summarize my simple approach. That may tie things together a bit for you. If you check my photos under Aquariums below my name on the left you'll see the results. Many of the planted tank aquarists here use this or a similar method.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
Byron is offline  
post #8 of 16 Old 01-29-2012, 07:30 AM
Member
 
DKRST's Avatar
 
Regarding your plant choices, I highly recommend swords for centerpiece plants that are easy to grow, unless you have a plecostomus. Welcome to TFK!

18 species/varieties of fish, 15 species/varieties of plants - The fish are finally ahead of the plants!
*560 gallons (2120 liters) in 5 tanks -> you do the math.
DKRST is offline  
post #9 of 16 Old 01-29-2012, 08:50 AM
TFK Moderator
 
Tazman's Avatar
 
I have used that API CO2 booster and I have to say if you have a large planted tank it can get very expensive dosing that stuff daily.

I tried a full course 32oZ bottle and it actually caused a dying piece of java fern to spring back into a bit of life. I now dont use any supplements for the live plants in my 75G tank and they are all perfectly healthy. My mbuna don't touch them and I had a piece of Anubias flower over last summer.

10g Fry / Hospital / QT tank (as needed)

75g Saltwater Reef, Ocellaris Clownfish, Lyretail Antias (baby), Lemon damsel, Longtail Fairy Wrasse, purple dottyback, snails, crabs and a few LPS corals.

220g Still sitting empty (come on Lottery I need the numbers to come up!)
Tazman is offline  
post #10 of 16 Old 01-29-2012, 11:41 PM Thread Starter
New Member
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
If you haven't seen it already, there is a 4-part series entitled A Basic Approach to the Natural Planted Aquarium stickied at the head of this section, in which I tried to summarize my simple approach. That may tie things together a bit for you. If you check my photos under Aquariums below my name on the left you'll see the results. Many of the planted tank aquarists here use this or a similar method.

Byron.
All I have to say is wow. I really wish I would've read that before I did anything with my tank. Thanks for that, it was very informative and I know now that I have way to big of a hob filter for my planted tank. Plus I was using purigen, just took it out last night after I finished reading the four part. And about lighting? I have a flora sun max grow light, ok, now is that "to much" since I have a oversized hob filter? I have it on for about 9 1/2 hours a day. I now know that I have to much flow to let my plants absorb enough co2. Thanks for all your help

Adam
arscott82 is offline  
Reply

Tags
api co2 booster

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
General hardness booster - needed? DKRST Beginner Planted Aquarium 5 11-06-2011 02:10 PM

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome