Anyone ever tried painting these? - Page 2 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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post #11 of 15 Old 04-20-2012, 02:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Geomancer View Post
Yes ... and they are designed to be used over a hood, not an open tank. There is a difference.

I'm not saying this is instantly catastrophic, or a guarantee, it's something that happens slowly over time. It might arc, it might burn, it might do nothing. Risk.

I guess ask yourself, why do they make exterior light fixtures if moisture makes no difference? If it's just because they last longer, why do building codes require the use of an exterior fixture?
Perhaps I didn't state it right. My 5 gallon Mini-bow hood WAS meant to be used over open water. It had a really cheap basically pointless condensation "guard" which is what I assume it was meant to do or perhaps to shield the bulb from direct splashes. It did basically nothing for condensation. Other then that it is a standard incandescent dual socket and was wired no differently then any other lamp socket I have seen. Originally it had wire nuts and a extra plastic 'shield' around the base of the wires and base of socket. Neither the bulb guard or plastic shield protected it sufficiently IMO. I completely rewired and modified it from the start. Its safer IMO then it was previously, still I run plastic wrap between the hood and the tank to keep the moisture off it and stop evaporation.

IMO main difference between interior and exterior fixtures is simply testing and perhaps a grounding wire and some small added moisture resistance. There is extra cost to test fixtures in a humid/outdoor setting to make sure they preform thus they are more expensive.

Regardless of the fixture any aquarium should be on a GFCI if you are truly worried about electrical equipment. All but one of my tanks are on GFCI outlets.

If your worried about dangerous malfunction there are many manufactured aquarium fixtures that have done that. My main point is a lot of aquarium hood/lights are overpriced pieces of junk. Odyssea is one brand name of cheap aquarium lights that has a lot of fire reports and other problems in the past.

Then again I am running ballasts that have absolutely no casing on them at all

.... I'm probably drunk.

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post #12 of 15 Old 04-20-2012, 08:55 PM
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I have yet to see or hear about a light fixture that is completely water proof if dropped in the tank. Theres very little difference between indoor and outdoor fixtures really mostly a foam gasket and cardboard ring that goes around base of bulb. were not even sure what he plans on doing with this light though.
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post #13 of 15 Old 04-22-2012, 07:08 PM
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I'd cover all exposed wires with aquarium silicone, and then spray the entire lamp with 'Krylon Fusion' paint.

Inside of the reflector should be white, but the outside can be any color.

Also, don't use incandescent bulbs- Go with CFLs. A 23W CFL produces more light than a 100W incandescent, lasts at least 10X longer, and produces about as much heat as a 10W bulb- it's WAY cooler.

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^^ genius
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post #14 of 15 Old 04-22-2012, 10:06 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Mikaila31 View Post
Also just something to note. CFLs will have a pretty short bulb life in those fixtures. The inverted (upside down) orientation will cause the ballast in the base of the bulb to get hotter. Also combined with the Humidity it they will have a pretty reduced life.
Eh, i'd have to disagree with this one. I work on lights and ballast for living and run into all types of fixtures. Some vast majority being CFL's which are always in the ceiling upside down hanging. They last any wheres from 2-3 years. Which is pretty decent IMO.

Also Humidity is not a problem unless you make it one. Use a glass top, so evaporation is not an issue for ur light fixtures.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Geomancer View Post
Yes ... and they are designed to be used over a hood, not an open tank. There is a difference.

I'm not saying this is instantly catastrophic, or a guarantee, it's something that happens slowly over time. It might arc, it might burn, it might do nothing. Risk.

I guess ask yourself, why do they make exterior light fixtures if moisture makes no difference? If it's just because they last longer, why do building codes require the use of an exterior fixture?
The only way it would "arc" is if it had wire nuts holding the wires together and one came loose to hit the actual fixture.

Glass top= No Catastrophe lol
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post #15 of 15 Old 04-22-2012, 10:30 PM
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