Anyone ever tried painting these?
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Beginner Freshwater Aquarium » Beginner Planted Aquarium » Anyone ever tried painting these?

Anyone ever tried painting these?

This is a discussion on Anyone ever tried painting these? within the Beginner Planted Aquarium forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> Was thinking about buying these Clamp lamp light fixtures and painting them. Of course I would need something that could tolerate higher heat, so ...

Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
Anyone ever tried painting these?
Old 04-19-2012, 09:11 PM   #1
 
Big Fate's Avatar
 
Anyone ever tried painting these?

Was thinking about buying these Clamp lamp light fixtures and painting them. Of course I would need something that could tolerate higher heat, so maybe some Caliper paint?

75-Watt Incandescent Clamp Light-CE-200PDQ at The Home Depot

What do you think?
Big Fate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2012, 09:16 PM   #2
 
Hanky's Avatar
 
I think as long as you get High temp paint that would be fine, There pretty cheap so even if it doesnt work your not out a whole lot, let us know how you make out.
Hanky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2012, 09:24 PM   #3
 
Big Fate's Avatar
 
Yea, exactly my thoughts. It'll probably be my next project in a few weeks. So i'll keep you posted
Big Fate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2012, 05:53 AM   #4
 
Geomancer's Avatar
 
Make sure it is kept away from humidity and has no chance of slipping and falling in the tank. Those clamps are not all that strong. A lid on the aquarium covers both bases.

Even with paint, the electrical components which are the only parts that mater (the socket, wires, and switch) will still be exposed to humidity and thus rust/corrosion which can lead to fire.
Geomancer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2012, 08:08 AM   #5
 
Big Fate's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geomancer View Post
Make sure it is kept away from humidity and has no chance of slipping and falling in the tank. Those clamps are not all that strong. A lid on the aquarium covers both bases.

Even with paint, the electrical components which are the only parts that mater (the socket, wires, and switch) will still be exposed to humidity and thus rust/corrosion which can lead to fire.
Huh??

Don't you think you're a bit reaching on that one?
Posted via Mobile Device
Big Fate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2012, 08:58 AM   #6
 
Geomancer's Avatar
 
No, on an open tank it's really best to have a light fixture that's designed for it. A fixture rated for exterior use may also be used. "Indoor only" fixtures, like what you linked, should not be used in humid environments for the same reasons they shouldn't be used outside.

A closed tank, one with a glass hood or similar, will keep the humidity inside the tank and be fine.
Geomancer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2012, 09:00 AM   #7
 
Termato's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Fate View Post
Was thinking about buying these Clamp lamp light fixtures and painting them. Of course I would need something that could tolerate higher heat, so maybe some Caliper paint?

75-Watt Incandescent Clamp Light-CE-200PDQ at The Home Depot

What do you think?
High Temp Paint and don't paint the inside of it. Works great!

I never used it for a tank though.
Termato is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2012, 12:58 PM   #8
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geomancer View Post
No, on an open tank it's really best to have a light fixture that's designed for it. A fixture rated for exterior use may also be used. "Indoor only" fixtures, like what you linked, should not be used in humid environments for the same reasons they shouldn't be used outside.

A closed tank, one with a glass hood or similar, will keep the humidity inside the tank and be fine.
I disagree. While I do use lids and swear by them. Vast majority of aquarium fixtures are made very poorly to the point that it makes me wonder how they passed safety laws. They sell a lot of small stock tanks with no lids, condensers, water proof connections or sockets. If I ever come across a stock hood that uses water proof heat shrink connectors or fancy wire nuts instead of general run of the mill wire nuts(which lead to corrosion) I will be amazed.

I can tell you the stock wiring in the hood for my Mini-bow aquarium would be equal to or worse then in those clamp lights.
Mikaila31 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2012, 01:21 PM   #9
 
Also just something to note. CFLs will have a pretty short bulb life in those fixtures. The inverted (upside down) orientation will cause the ballast in the base of the bulb to get hotter. Also combined with the Humidity it they will have a pretty reduced life. Main thing is the heat that I would worry about. It would be much better if the reflector had cooling vents/slots around the ballast. I've built a number of hood from kits or from total scratch as well as disassembled and improved stock hoods. Main things I try to achieve are water resistant connections and good heat management. Heat management is a biggy for me though, the better you manage heat the better and longer the fixture will preform well for you. Its not as vital using screw-in CFLs but in better fixtures like T5 HO or PC it can mean all the difference for the ballast which makes up about 1/2 cost of the fixture.

I personally would not use those clamp lights simply because (depending on tank size) there are other ways to get better light IMO. Probably not a cheap and definitely more work but you will get much more even spread and more efficient use of the light.
Mikaila31 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2012, 01:22 PM   #10
 
Geomancer's Avatar
 
Yes ... and they are designed to be used over a hood, not an open tank. There is a difference.

I'm not saying this is instantly catastrophic, or a guarantee, it's something that happens slowly over time. It might arc, it might burn, it might do nothing. Risk.

I guess ask yourself, why do they make exterior light fixtures if moisture makes no difference? If it's just because they last longer, why do building codes require the use of an exterior fixture?
Geomancer is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:53 PM.