Amazon Swords with brown spots on them, and Vals with hair??? on them - Page 4 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #31 of 40 Old 12-02-2012, 02:19 PM
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Also, should I just get rid of the swords that are damaged or should I just take the dead leaves off?
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Neither, for the present. Once the calcium and magnesium are increased, the swords will be able to develop new leaves properly. The existing leaves that are damaged will provide some nutrients to aid in the new growth. We term these mobile nutrients, and they include nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium.

When any of these are insufficient, the plants can move them from older leaves to newer leaves. This will cause the older leaf to slowly yellow and die, and it can be removed when it gets to an advanced state. I usually check the stem at the crown on swords; if this is browning, then the mobile nutrients are not going to go anywhere and the leaf might as well be pulled off.

This is another reason why diagnosing specific nutrient issues is not that easy. The yellowing of older leaves could be due to any one of the mobile nutrients being deficient. If the deficiency were nitrogen, and you assume potassium, adding more potassium will have no benefit. Target nutrient increases can be risky.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #32 of 40 Old 12-03-2012, 10:03 PM Thread Starter
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With equilibrium, how am I going calculate how much I need to use? Somebody mentioned substracting the sand, wood and rocks???
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post #33 of 40 Old 12-03-2012, 10:04 PM Thread Starter
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By the way, I also noticed the swords and vals really going down hill while the fish were out being treated, you think that cpuld have also been the reason for the swords going south?

Also, are plant weights bad for the water? I am using some for the luteas, and wisteria.
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post #34 of 40 Old 12-04-2012, 10:29 AM Thread Starter
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Sorry to be a pain, but I have the equilibrium, and need some hurry up advice on how much to plce in the aquarium.

125Gal: 7 Silver Dollars, 1 Albino BN Plecos, 1 Green Terror, 1 Gold Severum, Red Severum, 8 Rio Cahals, and 2 Festivum

55Gal: 3 German Blue Rams, 2 Bolivian Rams, 1 Super Red Pleco, 9 Bloodfin Tetras, and 9 Oto Catfish

29Gal: Quarentine/Hospital Tank

20Gal: Female Pastel Ball Python
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post #35 of 40 Old 12-04-2012, 12:29 PM
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With equilibrium, how am I going calculate how much I need to use? Somebody mentioned substracting the sand, wood and rocks???
Molst suggest subtracting 10-15 gallons (talking a 55g tank here). I would estimate it probably holds from 40-45 gallons.

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By the way, I also noticed the swords and vals really going down hill while the fish were out being treated, you think that cpuld have also been the reason for the swords going south?
What was the treatment/medication? Some will affect plants negatively. I have had issues from copper-based products, and antibiotics definitely affect some plants, I remember pygmy chain swords melting from Maracyn. But what I see in the photos is calcium deficiency, not the same.

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Also, are plant weights bad for the water? I am using some for the luteas, and Wisteria.
How actually "bad" may be debated, but most of us remove them. Wisteria will form incredible root systems in the substrate; I have pulled up some stems and couldn't believe the root mass from a simple stem.

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Sorry to be a pain, but I have the equilibrium, and need some hurry up advice on how much to plce in the aquarium.
Based on your previous number for GH of 30ppm [= 1.6 dGH] and wanting to raise it to between 4 and 6 dGH, I would do an initial dose of two level tablespoons. Test the GH just prior to the next water change. If you change half the tank volume, add one level tablespoon right after that water change. Test the GH prior to the next water change, and if it is between 4-6 dGH, continue with 1 tablespoon each 50% water change. Keep testing like this for a few weeks.

The aim is to keep the GH at 4 or above. After several weeks of doing similar, I've got mine down so I no longer bother testing, or maybe test once in 2-3 months as a spot check. Always test GH prior to the water change so you know the lowest level.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #36 of 40 Old 12-04-2012, 12:47 PM Thread Starter
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What was the treatment/medication? Some will affect plants negatively. I have had issues from copper-based products, and antibiotics definitely affect some plants, I remember pygmy chain swords melting from Maracyn. But what I see in the photos is calcium deficiency, not the same.
The treatment was in a totally different tank. The fish just weren't in the 55 gallon with the plants for about 10-14 days.


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How actually "bad" may be debated, but most of us remove them. Wisteria will form incredible root systems in the substrate; I have pulled up some stems and couldn't believe the root mass from a simple stem.
Well the Lutea and Wisteria just would not stay together and I found it very difficult to plant, but I guess I could go about wrapping the plants with sewing string.


Quote:
Based on your previous number for GH of 30ppm [= 1.6 dGH] and wanting to raise it to between 4 and 6 dGH, I would do an initial dose of two level tablespoons. Test the GH just prior to the next water change. If you change half the tank volume, add one level tablespoon right after that water change. Test the GH prior to the next water change, and if it is between 4-6 dGH, continue with 1 tablespoon each 50% water change. Keep testing like this for a few weeks.
Ok. As for doing the water change, how would I go about dosing the tank with prime and equilibrium? Wouldn't prime affect the effects of equilibrium because it removes metals???

125Gal: 7 Silver Dollars, 1 Albino BN Plecos, 1 Green Terror, 1 Gold Severum, Red Severum, 8 Rio Cahals, and 2 Festivum

55Gal: 3 German Blue Rams, 2 Bolivian Rams, 1 Super Red Pleco, 9 Bloodfin Tetras, and 9 Oto Catfish

29Gal: Quarentine/Hospital Tank

20Gal: Female Pastel Ball Python
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post #37 of 40 Old 12-04-2012, 01:12 PM
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Well the Lutea and Wisteria just would not stay together and I found it very difficult to plant, but I guess I could go about wrapping the plants with sewing string.
Remove the leaves from the lower portion of the stem, maybe 2-3 inches up. Then carefully (some may easily break) push the bare stem ends into the substrate as deep as you can go, and mound the substrate up around them. This usually works for me. If not, also place a small pebble or stone against the stems at the substrate level.

Wisteria is usually best planted as single stems, because the bunching together will almost certainly cause the loss of the lower leaves, leaving bare stems.

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Ok. As for doing the water change, how would I go about dosing the tank with prime and equilibrium? Wouldn't prime affect the effects of equilibrium because it removes metals???
The "hard" minerals in Equilibirum--calcium, magnesium, potassium--are not metals [the iron is, but this is not relevant] so Prime and other conditioners that detoxify heavy metals do not affect it. I use a jar with a tight-fitting screw cap, and not quite fill it with tap water, then add the level tablespoon, and shake vigorously. Not all the E will dissolve, but you can just pour this in making sure all the solids bits get in the tank. The water will be cloudy for a bit, and I find it takes close to 3 hours before all this has disappeared. The fish are not harmed, this is nothing but pure mineral.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #38 of 40 Old 12-06-2012, 11:36 AM Thread Starter
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Well, I finally received the E yesterday, and I dosed with 2 level tablespoons. Was pleased with how fast the water cleared up! Now I will begin to document and keep track of how the plants are doing. Cant wait to see how everything progresses.
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post #39 of 40 Old 12-09-2012, 10:53 PM Thread Starter
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Ok so after dosing, my GH is at 120 ppm right now. And that is 3 days after dosing.
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post #40 of 40 Old 12-10-2012, 12:25 PM
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Ok so after dosing, my GH is at 120 ppm right now. And that is 3 days after dosing.
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Good, that is between 6 and 7 dGH, you don't want it any higher. Leave it now, and immediately before the next weekly water change test the GH. That will be it's lowest point, since the plants will have used the calcium and magnesium during the week. The test result will tell you how much you may need to add to the replacement water (add it in the tank after the tank is filled, no need to add it to the water before filling, just to clarify). I would aim for a level of around 5 dGH.

If you want advice at that poiint, post. I found this was the experimental stage, for a few weeks, to get it dowsn pat. Once you do, just add that amount with ev ery identical water change, and it should remain.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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