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Algea help - what algea cleaners do you use

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Algea help - what algea cleaners do you use
Old 07-18-2009, 09:28 AM   #11
 
Well I hate the idea of not using my other light fixture. I am seeing greener plants and new growth. Ill definately try the root tabs for the swords. I attributed the yellowing leaves to the algae however there are some newer leaves coming from them. Would I prune the long leaves to get wider growth toward the base of them?

My reasoning for the ferts are that they both have different micronutrients with just one or two in common. For example only one has iron. I think I will continue to alternate perhaps just spacing out more and dosing less. I really want to plant more heavily I am trying to let it fill naturally, I think I have opposing thoughts. One I want to plant heavily, two I am nervous about planting too close together especially different species.
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Old 07-18-2009, 09:41 AM   #12
 
I forget, what kind of bulbs do you have on your tanks? How do all those corys do in your 90 gallon? Plenty of room for them to move? How many total do you have in there?
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Old 07-18-2009, 04:48 PM   #13
 
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By reducing your light,and greatly reducing your photo period,this should help.I would also cut out the ferts all together.With the WPG and photo period cut down,there will probably be enough waste from the fish to feed your plants.Adding ferts also feeds the algae.

Because you already have the fixture,have you considered pressurized CO2?
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Old 07-18-2009, 05:57 PM   #14
 
Only really thought about a DIY Co2 but most seem to recommend against it. I would like to optimize plant growth in the best way to fight algae. Is a DIY much worse than a store bought system. I was thinking just yeast and sugar going into a diffuser of some sort thru an air line. Again most have said prob not to bother with Co2 but that if its the limiting factor algae will take advantage. I suppose I could try the Co2 and see how that fights the algae.
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Old 07-19-2009, 08:19 AM   #15
 
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Well I hate the idea of not using my other light fixture. I am seeing greener plants and new growth. Ill definately try the root tabs for the swords. I attributed the yellowing leaves to the algae however there are some newer leaves coming from them. Would I prune the long leaves to get wider growth toward the base of them?

My reasoning for the ferts are that they both have different micronutrients with just one or two in common. For example only one has iron. I think I will continue to alternate perhaps just spacing out more and dosing less. I really want to plant more heavily I am trying to let it fill naturally, I think I have opposing thoughts. One I want to plant heavily, two I am nervous about planting too close together especially different species.
I'll respond to this and the subsequent post on CO2 since they are related. Plants grow by photosynthesis, and in order to photosynthesize the light and nutrients (includes CO2 and macro-nutrients and micro-nutrients) must be in balance. If one of these is too much to balance the others, the plants cannot utilize it. This is where algae steps in; it can more easily convert carbon from carbonates than plants, so with an excess of light and/or nutrients the algae can increase even though there is not sufficient carbon from CO2. The plants are in this case at a disadvantage.

You will not combat this algae without reducing the light. As for the macro- and micro-nutrients, they also have to be in balance. Using two distinct fertilizers is in my view probably not providing what the plants actually need in terms of the correct amount of each macro- and micro-nutrient. One good comprehensive fertilizer is all that is necessary, unless you start dosing every nutrient individually; but getting these in the proper balance would be impossible for me and I suspect for you, so I would not go down that road. There are good balanced fertilizers available; Seachem's Flourish Comprehensive and Kent Freshwater Plant are two I have used with equal success.

The yellowing leaves in this case are not due to the algae, but very simply to lack of some nutrient. With swords this is frequently iron, but other nutrient deficiencies can also cause yellowing leaves. There was a chart linked in another thread (on this forum I think) that had yellowing leaves for almost every nutrient deficiency, so playing guesswork at figuring out which is not advisable. Some nutrients in excess can cause plants to react by shutting down absorbtion of another nutrient. The ony sensible way is with a balanced fertilizer. Peter Hiscock explains this in his book, and several other plant experts have written the same. Seachem provides a list of the nutrients and their porportion in Flourish on their website.

As for the leaves of the swords, it is a safe bet that the larger leaves are those that were on the plant when you bought them, and the smaller are those that have grown in your tank. The two leaf forms will be different. Plants are usually propogated emersed by the nursery (it is easier and less expensive), much as they grow in the wild; most, but not all, Echinodorus are bog plants in the wild, emersed during the dry season and submersed during the flooding, but they thrive fully submersed in our aquaria. The emersed and submersed leaf forms are quite different, as a result of growing with or without the support of water and the biological functions the plant carries out through the leaves. Most of the emersed leaves will die off as the submersed leaves grow.
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Old 07-19-2009, 08:39 AM   #16
 
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I forget, what kind of bulbs do you have on your tanks? How do all those corys do in your 90 gallon? Plenty of room for them to move? How many total do you have in there?
Full spectrum are the best fluorescent tubes over a planted tank. The best single tube on its own in my experience is Hagen's Life-Glo 2 which simulates mid-day sun in the tropics in terms of its spectrum and intensity. With two tubes once can mix for optimum plant growth and viewing. On all my tanks I have one Life-Glo 2 tube. The second tube on the 115g [the 90g in the current photos] is a Lightning Rod T6 Superlux which is a 11,000 Kelvin (=higher in the blue, the colour plants most require). Blue also penetrates water better [good thing] so over a deeper tank is useful. Blue makes the tank look cold, and blue and red (red is the second colour plants need) becomes purplish. The green balances the colour even though the plants don't use it--they reflect green, which is why their leaves appear green.

On the 70g in the photos the second tube is a Phillips Daylight Deluxe, a bit higher in red (warmer). I have this week set up my 115g again, and will post photos in a few days when it has settled. I have 1 Life-Glo 2 and 1 Lightning Rod over it. The 90g is presently being reset (it will house the plants and fish from the 70g) and it has a Life-Glo 2 and a Zoo Med Tropic Sun 5500K full spectrum, a bit higher in the warm colours. I plan on getting another Lightning Rod for this tank as well, since it is also deeper and I really do like the combination on the 115g.

Re the corys, they are thriving. Those in the 90g are now in the 115g, and there are 13 corys plus 3 Aspidoras sp (another genus in the family, very close to the Corydoras). The corys are 5 C. gossei, 2 C. metae, 2 C. sterbai, 1 C. leopardus, 1 C. latus, 1 C. reticulatus, and 1 C. algodon [a newly described species still quite rare, similar to C. fowleri]. I'll be getting more corys as I find them [and will be adding a couple C. reticulatus and possibly C. algodon shortly]. Previously for several years I've had 20-30 various corydoras in the 115g and the 90g. They chum around with each other whatever the species.
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Old 07-19-2009, 11:40 AM   #17
 
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You will not combat this algae without reducing the light. As for the macro- and micro-nutrients, they also have to be in balance. Using two distinct fertilizers is in my view probably not providing what the plants actually need in terms of the correct amount of each macro- and micro-nutrient. One good comprehensive fertilizer is all that is necessary, unless you start dosing every nutrient individually; but getting these in the proper balance would be impossible for me and I suspect for you, so I would not go down that road. There are good balanced fertilizers available; Seachem's Flourish Comprehensive and Kent Freshwater Plant are two I have used with equal success.
Well I have Kent Marine Pro Plant Freshwater Plant Growth Accelerator. What confuses me is that the Nitrogen in that is 1% and only .15% in the other brand. The other brand is also Iron enriched which I think I need. The Kent says on the back label to use the Kent Marine Iron and Manganese fertilizer in conjuction with the Kent that I have. I guess I should purchase the same brand to maintain the proper balance of nutrients but I haven't yet seen a fertilizer that contains all these nutrients in one. Wow, the seachem site has convinced me that is the fertilizer I want to go with. I can always diagnose further problems and treat them later if need be. The nitrogen is even lower in the seachem, only .07%.

I have a chart in a library book of nutrient deficiencies and it sounds like it could be magnesium alghough it is unclear based on the description and what I have observed, I guess it could also be Potassium or as you said Iron. Interesting about the echinodorus, the leaf shape appears a bit different but could be from being young too. It looks like just some tips and edges of a few older leaves are brown and dead.
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Old 07-19-2009, 04:55 PM   #18
 
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Well I have Kent Marine Pro Plant Freshwater Plant Growth Accelerator. What confuses me is that the Nitrogen in that is 1% and only .15% in the other brand. The other brand is also Iron enriched which I think I need. The Kent says on the back label to use the Kent Marine Iron and Manganese fertilizer in conjuction with the Kent that I have. I guess I should purchase the same brand to maintain the proper balance of nutrients but I haven't yet seen a fertilizer that contains all these nutrients in one. Wow, the seachem site has convinced me that is the fertilizer I want to go with. I can always diagnose further problems and treat them later if need be. The nitrogen is even lower in the seachem, only .07%.

I have a chart in a library book of nutrient deficiencies and it sounds like it could be magnesium alghough it is unclear based on the description and what I have observed, I guess it could also be Potassium or as you said Iron. Interesting about the echinodorus, the leaf shape appears a bit different but could be from being young too. It looks like just some tips and edges of a few older leaves are brown and dead.
Please pardon me for repeating myself, but you really have to be careful. Trying to guess a deficiency is more likely to result in overdosing something and causing more trouble. A balance is simply that, everything the plants need in the proper balance. I don't know what an Accelerator does, and as you noted something else should be used with it...they are trying to sell this stuff. I have always gone simple...obviously I know I need a fertilizer to provide the trace elements and macro-nutrients not in the tap water or not adequately supplied by the fish. Kent Freshwater Plant Supplement worked years ago, and currently I'm using the Flourish Comprehensive. I also have the Hagen Plant Gro sticks inserted next to the roots of the larger swords; and what a difference that made in three months. Swords are heavy feeders, but as you can see from the photos of my aquaria they are lush green and sending out flower spikes, so they are not missing iron or something else with the Flourish. And I'm saving money by not buying half a dozen things. I bought the largest size Flourish last October and it is not half gone yet; it was $49 (that's Canadian, it would be less in the US) but as it lasts more than a year, not too expensive for good plant growth in 2 large aquaria (soon to be 3).
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Old 07-20-2009, 09:34 AM   #19
 
green spot will be grazed by otos and SAE if they have nothing else. They can keep it under check if the growth is slow. I used to have a an entire side of my tank covered with ti but after i fixed the water parameters and the light times, i scraped it off and the algae eaters seem to do the rest. Only see it sporadically now.
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Old 07-20-2009, 09:55 AM   #20
 
Cool. The addition of 3 more SAEs seems to have the tank much cleaner.
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