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Algae!

This is a discussion on Algae! within the Beginner Planted Aquarium forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> No, actually. There is some minor green dust by the cannon, but otherwise, it's all on the glass, scrubber, and filter intake - and ...

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Old 02-18-2012, 03:45 PM   #31
 
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No, actually. There is some minor green dust by the cannon, but otherwise, it's all on the glass, scrubber, and filter intake - and some select pieces of grass.
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Old 02-18-2012, 03:49 PM   #32
 
What I meant was is the algae all oriented in a certain direction, perhaps toward a window?
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Old 02-18-2012, 03:56 PM   #33
 
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No, nor really. Just in select places. It's nowhere near a window.
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Old 02-18-2012, 04:16 PM   #34
 
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It seems that Victoria does have soft water, but I have crushed coral to help this - I did have slate/flat rock pieces, but those got taken out... Is there anything else I can add to harden the water? Frequently Asked Water Quality Questions
According to that link, the water is still as it was when I lived there, with respect to hardness. Very soft, 1.5ppm is their number. That's identical or perhaps just minutely softer than Vancouver's water. I can't measure it with the API GH test, so it is less than 1 dGH here.

Why do you want to harden the water? Presumably for the fish, and plants; so what fish specifically? I am going through this issue myself, and there are several options, depending upon the fish species intended.

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Heavy Metal in drinking water Water for life Victoria BC British Columbia Canada Lead in water This just says we also have heavy metals in the water - which, a few months ago, prompted me to use the metal remover, not knowing this was unnecessary.
I glanced at this but stopped reading when I saw it was put out by some special interest group, not the water authority folks. With respect to fish, using a standard water conditioner that detoxifies heavy metals is all you need. To be honest, the plants will take up these anyway, either as nutrients (some are mineral nutrients essential to plants and to fish and humans for that matter) or as toxins.

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So now we have Shadow, the male Black Molly - whom is making short work of everything, albeit a little stressed. Should I salt the tank (very slowly, since I have a baby Otto in there as well?)
No. While a tank of only mollies can have salt without being detrimental to the fish, other fish have varying tolerances to salt. And plants too for that matter. Otos should never be exposed to salt, or hard water--and this is what the molly absolutely needs. It will not last long in soft water. I go into this more when I know the answer to the other issue above on the fish intended. Adding any minerals (of which salt is simply one) has to take into account the species.

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Old 02-18-2012, 04:22 PM   #35
 
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I guess I'm just confused and uninformed - I thought the Molly needed harder water? Doesn't the Coral help that? He seems much happier now, pecking at all the hair algae there is. I also thought Mollies NEEDED salt. Good thing I waited on salting the tank, Lol.

Also, I have been using a water conditioner/metal detoxifier - but earlier in the topic I was recommended to stop?

I haven't seen any signs of stress from the Otto - she's happily cleaning the grass. If I do see stress, I can easily put her in with my son's fish, or over in the 33. So far, I'm seeing nothing in the way of stress for anything. Mr Molly has even picked out his favorite spot and ran off the Ryukin once, .
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Old 02-18-2012, 05:05 PM   #36
 
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I guess I'm just confused and uninformed - I thought the Molly needed harder water? Doesn't the Coral help that? He seems much happier now, pecking at all the hair algae there is. I also thought Mollies NEEDED salt. Good thing I waited on salting the tank, Lol.
Don't be quick to take things out of context. If you check my previous post, you will note I mentioned that mollies must have hard water, must. But salt, as in sodium chloride, is very different. Soft water fish however should not be subjected to hard water especially when soft water is so readily available. Keep the fish separated.

How much coral? What is the resulting pH? And what fish (aside from the molly)?

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Also, I have been using a water conditioner/metal detoxifier - but earlier in the topic I was recommended to stop?
Initially I assumed this was some special product, not just a normal water conditioner. Most of us don't single this out, as it is a component of most (but not all) conditioners. With live plants you really don't need any form of metal detoxifying, as levels of these is not going to be that high in municipal drinking water supplies. We refer to them as trace amounts. But as most conditioners include this feature, fine. I've been using one that doesn't, Big Al's, which only detoxifies chlorine/chloramine. [Which reminds me, that Victoria water site mentioned they are using chloramine now, that is new; when I lived there they used so little chlorine you could go without conditioners, now they are using both.] Another I use does detoxify metals. I dose the plant Flourish the day following, since the conditioner will detoxify the minerals in the fertilizer, which is rather pointless.

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I haven't seen any signs of stress from the Otto - she's happily cleaning the grass. If I do see stress, I can easily put her in with my son's fish, or over in the 33. So far, I'm seeing nothing in the way of stress for anything. Mr Molly has even picked out his favorite spot and ran off the Ryukin once, .
Stress, expected from what?
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Old 02-18-2012, 05:19 PM   #37
 
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Okay... See my signature. The 15 gallon is what we're talking about here. Substrate is crushed coral, about 2 inches of it, and one piece of dead liverock.

Fish inside would be a Ryukin juvenile, Shubunkin juvenile, Otoclinus teenager, and a Molly teenager. I had mentioned above that the Molly was bought FOR me, so I put him in. So far, there is no signs of pH stress from either fish - blackening, dulled scales, gill discoloring, lethargy, ect. None of that is happening with any of the fish.

Stress would be expected from the pH, because you said the Otto needs soft, and the Molly needs hard. Neither are stressed. I'd wager to say it's a little high for the otto and low for the molly, both in the tolerable range.

As far as the exact pH, I have no idea. I don't have test kits right now - I rely on fish behavior to tell me if something is off, then I do a huge water change.

Hopefully that helps unconfuse you.
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Old 02-18-2012, 05:36 PM   #38
 
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Originally Posted by CowgirlFishKeeper View Post
Okay... See my signature. The 15 gallon is what we're talking about here. Substrate is crushed coral, about 2 inches of it, and one piece of dead liverock.

Fish inside would be a Ryukin juvenile, Shubunkin juvenile, Otoclinus teenager, and a Molly teenager. I had mentioned above that the Molly was bought FOR me, so I put him in. So far, there is no signs of pH stress from either fish - blackening, dulled scales, gill discoloring, lethargy, ect. None of that is happening with any of the fish.

Stress would be expected from the pH, because you said the Otto needs soft, and the Molly needs hard. Neither are stressed. I'd wager to say it's a little high for the otto and low for the molly, both in the tolerable range.

As far as the exact pH, I have no idea. I don't have test kits right now - I rely on fish behavior to tell me if something is off, then I do a huge water change.

Hopefully that helps unconfuse you.
Please get yourself a pH test kit, the API basic is about the best. It covers from 6 up to 7.6 or thereabouts. This is important. By the time fish have reacted to deterioriating water, it is too late. The stress something like this causes weakens the immune system--in fish just as it is now known to do in humans. I am dealing with cancer, and I know all about stress. And major water changes with water having such different parameters is also stressful. Regular (once each week) partial changes (volume depends upon several factors) is the best way to achieve stability. And water stability goes a long way toward healthy fish.

The coral should be fine, the pH in that tank is likely to be about 8, which is OK for the molly and the goldfish, but not for the oto. Can you move him elsewhere? And he needs a group, minimum three. Otocinclus, like corys, are social fish that live in groups of hundreds.

Stress is not always visual. That oto now is under stress, from being alone, and from the hard water. Otos are wild caught, from very soft and acidic water streams. Many do not make it to the store, and arrive nearly starved. Many members can tell you how many otos they have lost when first acquired. But, there are always some fish--just as there are some people--who seem to be "hardier" when it comes to stress. Reducing the stress for our fish the best we can will undoubtedly benefit the fish.
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Old 02-18-2012, 05:44 PM   #39
 
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I can't afford the test kit right now - I have an extremely tight budget and I'm already looking at a plant or two, I need more food, my kid's tank needs a better filtration system because of his new fish, I have to consider more otos which means I'd have to move them to my son's tank, which is a 10 gallon, and that means overfiltering, so I now need to buy a filter fit for a 20 or even a 30 gallon, and I only get enough money to barely survive...

I might be able to do the red cabbage test, though.
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Old 02-18-2012, 07:18 PM   #40
 
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Originally Posted by CowgirlFishKeeper View Post
I can't afford the test kit right now - I have an extremely tight budget and I'm already looking at a plant or two, I need more food, my kid's tank needs a better filtration system because of his new fish, I have to consider more otos which means I'd have to move them to my son's tank, which is a 10 gallon, and that means overfiltering, so I now need to buy a filter fit for a 20 or even a 30 gallon, and I only get enough money to barely survive...

I might be able to do the red cabbage test, though.
I'd just put the oto in the 10g, on its own; a sole oto is less stress than the hard water.
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