Adding plants during fish less cycling? - Page 2
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Beginner Freshwater Aquarium » Beginner Planted Aquarium » Adding plants during fish less cycling?

Adding plants during fish less cycling?

This is a discussion on Adding plants during fish less cycling? within the Beginner Planted Aquarium forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> Hi Byron: That's really interesting! So, when I get the plants, I'll do a water change aiming for 2 ppm ammonia in the tank. ...

Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
Adding plants during fish less cycling?
Old 07-05-2011, 10:45 AM   #11
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Hi Byron: That's really interesting! So, when I get the plants, I'll do a water change aiming for 2 ppm ammonia in the tank. Then let the plants acclimate to the water and the stress of replanting. Then I'll add several fish. It'll mostly be common tropical fish, nothing exotic or super expensive.
When the plants arrive, I would do a major water change; idea is to remove all ammonia, but whatever little is left after this, the plants will handle. I would also have some liquid fertilizer on hand to dose the tank the first day. Some say do this, others don't. I always do. Plants need nutrients, and in a new tank with no organics to create nutrients, I think it best to add some. I recommend Seachem's Flourish Comprehensive Suplement as the best; it only takes a very small amount, for a 55g this would be 1/2 teaspoon once a week. Make sure it is Flourish Comprehensive, they make several different products under the "Flourish" name.

Quote:
Is it fair to say you can create a biological filtration by either having live plants OR having nitates remove the nitrites?
I always plant new tanks and add fish the same day I set it up, and I haven't lost anything yet. Ammonia and nitrite are zero, or at any rate undetectable with the API test. The plants handle it. There are also probably a lot of bacteria on the plants and wood, since I tend to move these from existing tanks, and bacteria will colonize all surfaces under water. I tend to advise others to go slow, to be safe. But I can set up a 115g aquarium with new filter/media and substrate in one day and have it running by the end of the day with 90+ fish in it. As long as you know what you're doing, this is easy.


Quote:
So, let me ask you this: Could you create a biologically balanced new tank, that would be fish friendly, just by planting live plants and feeding the plants?
The tank would be fish-ready and they would be fine, as explained in the two previous responses. The "established" takes time regardless. In any "new" tank the biology has to sort itself out, and as I mentioned earlier many factors influence this, from the water params, number and type of fish, number and type of plants, substrate and decor, filtration, light, fish food, etc. During the initial break-in towards establishment, there will be some fluctuation in water conditions, and there are some fish that do not adjust to this, so we wait before adding those.

Quote:
I find this really interesting Byron, if there's any articles out there that describe this, let me know...I don't want to waste your time...with all these questions, because I'm going to have a lot more once I get the tank established and going!
Thanks again, you're a wealth of knowledge!
Never Quit
Thank you. We all learn from asking; I am still learning after 20 years of fish. I learn from others on this forum and research; in life we never stop learning.

Byron.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-2011, 07:45 PM   #12
 
Byron: Thanks for the information...EXCELLENT! I have one question, that may be tough to answer: I'm about to get some plants for the 55....HOW MANY plants would I need to maintain a biologically balanced tank? I would think that's a tough question...I think it would be the product of species and size. That being said, can I use my intuitive notion, and looking at the planted tank say "Yes, that looks like the density of plants isn't too great." On the other side of that coin, I think it would be possible to overstock with plants. In that situation you could look at the fish and see they have no room to swim. Are there any pictures on line that would show what a good, healthy planted tank looks like?
Thanks again
Never Quit
never quit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-2011, 08:29 PM   #13
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by never quit View Post
Byron: Thanks for the information...EXCELLENT! I have one question, that may be tough to answer: I'm about to get some plants for the 55....HOW MANY plants would I need to maintain a biologically balanced tank? I would think that's a tough question...I think it would be the product of species and size. That being said, can I use my intuitive notion, and looking at the planted tank say "Yes, that looks like the density of plants isn't too great." On the other side of that coin, I think it would be possible to overstock with plants. In that situation you could look at the fish and see they have no room to swim. Are there any pictures on line that would show what a good, healthy planted tank looks like?
Thanks again
Never Quit
Well, look at the photos under "Aquariums" below my name on the left.

You partly answered your own question; the number of plants does depend upon what they are. I tend to put in more than will be needed later, and then remove some later (to other tanks). I like substrate-rooted plants because you plant them and that's it, they grow without any fussing. Swords are perfect for this; Vallisneria esp the Corkscrew Vallisneria, pygmy chain sword, crypts (though fussy with water fluctuations), and some others as accent.

Stem plants need regular trimming, some more than others, and higher light, so i shy away from most. Brazilian Pennywort though is a marvel; I bought one small cluster of 3-4 stems 2 years ago, and it took a while but once it settled and started to grow, wow. Since then I have tossed out enough to plant dozens of tanks. It is great floating.

Fish swimming room has to be considered; know what fish you intend, then buy plants accordingly. Click the shaded names above to see the plant profile, and browse the others for ideas.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-2011, 11:50 AM   #14
 
Thanks Byron: I'll get some of the species you recommend...In about a week or so, I'll post a new thread and discuss how the process of planting and adding fish went.

Thanks again for all your help
Never Quit
never quit is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
question on cycling adding a living plant mvirata Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 1 05-20-2010 10:46 PM
Adding new gravel during cycling tigga Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 3 04-08-2007 12:15 AM
Cycling - Adding fish too soon? gmckey Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 10 03-26-2007 04:33 PM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:23 AM.