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55 gallon planted tank progress( for those who care)

This is a discussion on 55 gallon planted tank progress( for those who care) within the Beginner Planted Aquarium forums, part of the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium category; --> Originally Posted by Quantum I hope it didn't seem like I was suggesting otherwise. Play sand is a good choice because it is crystalline ...

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55 gallon planted tank progress( for those who care)
Old 03-24-2012, 10:55 AM   #71
 
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I hope it didn't seem like I was suggesting otherwise. Play sand is a good choice because it is crystalline silica: it is mostly insoluble in water at low temps and pressures and is chemically stable. The only issue is the inhalation hazard, just follow the manufacturers recommendations.

Silica is relevant with regard to diatoms because the cell walls of these organisms are made of silica, but it must be in a form they can utilize (which I believe is silicic acid). Crystalline quartz will not be a source of this since it will not dissolve in any significant amount in water at the temps encountered in aquaria - other more soluble forms of silica can, crystalline quartz won't.
Not at all. I have no idea about the composition of playsand (I looked on the bag, it says nothing at all) and the analysis posted is above me. I know I have read that "silica sand" can contribute silicates, and I have read that playsand does not...so I went with playsand and so far OK.
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Old 03-28-2012, 08:34 PM   #72
 
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update

I'm on spring break and away from my fish tank. My moms caring for it( lord help us) Hopefully I won't return to brown, uprooted plants. She says it fine. I hope it is. I have to call her in the morning so she can add some fourish comp. Hopefully I won't forget. I WANT ( note want) to try and pick up some things this weekend.
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Old 03-28-2012, 08:42 PM   #73
 
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Looking good. What are you gonna try and pick up? I'm thinking you need a piece of driftwood or something.
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Old 03-28-2012, 08:47 PM   #74
 
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Looking good. What are you gonna try and pick up? I'm thinking you need a piece of driftwood or something.
Thanks! Yea, thats what I want to get driftwood and a few more plants.
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Old 03-29-2012, 10:31 AM   #75
 
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Pruning? I think thats how you spell it

I heard people say it's one of the things to you do with stem plants, but how do you do it? I don't want to chop up my plants. HELP NEEDED
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Old 03-29-2012, 11:45 AM   #76
 
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I heard people say it's one of the things to you do with stem plants, but how do you do it? I don't want to chop up my plants. HELP NEEDED
Stem plants grow by lengthening the stem, and fairly quickly. When you prune or trim stem plants depends upon how fast they are growing and what effect you want.

Stem plants will naturally grow toward the light, which being overhead means toward the surface. Once they reach the surface, most will continue to grow along the surface; a few may extend above in to the air, depending upon species. Once they have reached the surface, less light will be available to the lower portions and those leaves frequently yellow and die off, leaving bare stems. If you do no pruning or trimming, in time the stem plants will cover the surface but the lower growth will be nothing but stems.

Trimming is done to maintain a compact and healthy plant. Most of us trim them when the shoots reach the surface. At this point you can do one of two things. Either cut off the stems at some lower point, replant the tip portions as new plants, and continue. The lower portion left in the substrate on some species will branch out where the stem is cut. This can be useful, to thicken the planting. However, the lower leaves will still usually die off in time. Depending upon the species and what effect you want, this is one option.

The other and probably more common option is to cut off the upper portion of the stems as before, but uproot the lower portions and throw them away. Replant the upper portions. They will grow to the surface, then the process is repeated. The length of top portion you cut off depends upon the growth; go down the stem to the point where the leaves clearly are not doing so well. The length is up to you, again depending upon what effect you want.
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Old 03-29-2012, 02:59 PM   #77
 
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Stem plants grow by lengthening the stem, and fairly quickly. When you prune or trim stem plants depends upon how fast they are growing and what effect you want.

Stem plants will naturally grow toward the light, which being overhead means toward the surface. Once they reach the surface, most will continue to grow along the surface; a few may extend above in to the air, depending upon species. Once they have reached the surface, less light will be available to the lower portions and those leaves frequently yellow and die off, leaving bare stems. If you do no pruning or trimming, in time the stem plants will cover the surface but the lower growth will be nothing but stems.

Trimming is done to maintain a compact and healthy plant. Most of us trim them when the shoots reach the surface. At this point you can do one of two things. Either cut off the stems at some lower point, replant the tip portions as new plants, and continue. The lower portion left in the substrate on some species will branch out where the stem is cut. This can be useful, to thicken the planting. However, the lower leaves will still usually die off in time. Depending upon the species and what effect you want, this is one option.

The other and probably more common option is to cut off the upper portion of the stems as before, but uproot the lower portions and throw them away. Replant the upper portions. They will grow to the surface, then the process is repeated. The length of top portion you cut off depends upon the growth; go down the stem to the point where the leaves clearly are not doing so well. The length is up to you, again depending upon what effect you want.
Hum... The plant is Cabomba soo it want it to look bushy. Which meltod is be best? I'm a bit unsure, because I'm new to this and don't want to mess things up.
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Old 03-29-2012, 05:30 PM   #78
 
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Hum... The plant is Cabomba soo it want it to look bushy. Which meltod is be best? I'm a bit unsure, because I'm new to this and don't want to mess things up.
It has been so long since I kept Cabomba that I can't recall how well it branches of the tips are cut off. But usually it comes in bunches of several stems, and will grow up quite thick anyway. But I wouldn't let it grow along the surface if it is rooted in the substrate, as the lower leaves will quickly die off as explained previously. And trimming the stems to different lengths before planting the bunch (always trim the bottom part off, keeping the top which is the growth end) will provide a better arrangement, more natural.
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Old 03-29-2012, 06:38 PM   #79
 
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It has been so long since I kept Cabomba that I can't recall how well it branches of the tips are cut off. But usually it comes in bunches of several stems, and will grow up quite thick anyway. But I wouldn't let it grow along the surface if it is rooted in the substrate, as the lower leaves will quickly die off as explained previously. And trimming the stems to different lengths before planting the bunch (always trim the bottom part off, keeping the top which is the growth end) will provide a better arrangement, more natural.
Ok, so I'll trim from the bottom.
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Old 04-01-2012, 09:30 PM   #80
 
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Angry Ugh!!

Well I returned home to find my tank looking like crap!! The plants are fine, but the tank was a MESS! There's algae all over the sand along with dead plant leaves and leftover food. Which is sign my mom over fed. The water line was also super low, 5 gallons. The thing is when I called and asked how my tank was doing she said it looked fine!!
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