Would these fish overload my tank? - Page 2 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #11 of 17 Old 12-04-2012, 04:14 PM Thread Starter
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Yep! That's him/her! I would rehome it if there was a single person I knew who could take it! The woman I was gonna give it to kills every fish she gets becuase she doesn't care for them properly so I couldn't send the little one to its death! I really don't like it in my tank as it doesn't work with my current setup, but I'm at a loss at to what to do. I want 2-3 more Juliis and 2 more neons. The Black Tetra isn't bothering Gus, but she IS bothering my shrimp now which bothers me
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post #12 of 17 Old 12-05-2012, 03:02 PM Thread Starter
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I'm not proud of it, but I rehomed the Black Skirt Tetra with the woman I origally bought it for. She promised me she had learned her lesson when she killed almost all her fish and will now be doing pwc and correct feeding. Not sure how long it will stick, but I hope for the little fish's sake that she is serious.

I will be headed to PetSmart next month, so how many Juliis and Neons would work? I want everyone happy and healthy.
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post #13 of 17 Old 12-05-2012, 05:47 PM
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I'm not proud of it, but I rehomed the Black Skirt Tetra with the woman I origally bought it for. She promised me she had learned her lesson when she killed almost all her fish and will now be doing pwc and correct feeding. Not sure how long it will stick, but I hope for the little fish's sake that she is serious.

I will be headed to PetSmart next month, so how many Juliis and Neons would work? I want everyone happy and healthy.
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As mentioned previously, the corys are the critical fish to increase the group, and I would say another 2 at absolute minimum but 3 more would be better.

I am loathe to suggest any more fish in this 10g, but another 3 neons might work. Be vigilant with water changes. And keep an eye out for trouble with the Betta from the neons, and vice versa.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #14 of 17 Old 12-06-2012, 12:26 AM Thread Starter
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I was thinking 2 more Juliis and 2 more neons. It will make them both happier even though they will be slightly below ideal. What do you think?
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post #15 of 17 Old 12-06-2012, 11:24 AM
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I was thinking 2 more Juliis and 2 more neons. It will make them both happier even though they will be slightly below ideal. What do you think?
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I'm think more of the physical space for the fish species, rather than water quality which you can manage to some extent with water changes and plants. But the space is finite.

The corys don't care much about space, they just poke around all over the tank. And given their social structure, the more the better. I have a couple species with only 2 or 3 of the species, but they are in a tank with over 30 corys, so this is less of an issue. Five is the minimum number of corys in a tank, when that is possible. So here I am suggesting 3 more to make 4.

The neons now are a different issue entirely. They need physical space, but being fairly sedate fish (not active swimmers as say rummy's are) they can be pushed a bit further than some species. Remember, they grow--if they are in a suitable environment with sufficient space--to about 1.5 inches.
Assuming they are small now, and if you were to get a larger tank within a few months, getting 7-8 now would be fine. But if the 10g is going to be their permanent and final home, I would up the group to 5.

I think that is about the best I can explain my rationale.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #16 of 17 Old 12-06-2012, 12:04 PM Thread Starter
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Okay, I will try my best to save up enough to get them all. I know I can save up enough for either 2 Juliis and 2 Neons OR 3 Juliis, but getting enough for 3 Juliis and 2 Neons will be tough. If I can't save up enough, which is more important? The extra Julii or the 2 Neons?
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post #17 of 17 Old 12-06-2012, 12:51 PM
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Okay, I will try my best to save up enough to get them all. I know I can save up enough for either 2 Juliis and 2 Neons OR 3 Juliis, but getting enough for 3 Juliis and 2 Neons will be tough. If I can't save up enough, which is more important? The extra Julii or the 2 Neons?
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Definitely the Julii corys; they are highly social and need company.

Now, I know othes might chime in here that they have a lone cory or two and "they are fine" but I never buy this. Only the fish knows if it is fine or not. All we can do is learn what it needs to be fine, and then provide that as best we can, knowing we will always fall short of the "perfect" but that doesn't mean we should not strive to get as close as we can. The fish will be healthier.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]

Last edited by Byron; 12-06-2012 at 12:54 PM.
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