Would this Tank be ok? - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #1 of 20 Old 07-05-2013, 02:11 PM Thread Starter
Question Would this Tank be ok?

I'm really interested in caring for fish, but I've never done it before. I have looked at some hardy breeds that would be good for a first time aquarium. I've planned this: Having a 20 gal. tank with a power filter, filtering 80 gal. per hour. With a submersible heater. The fish I'm planning to have are: at least 4 Cherry Barb, at least 8 Harlequin Rasbora, one or two platty, at least 6 Corydoras, and at least 6 Neon Tettras. Is that overly ambitious? Would I need an even bigger tank? I plan to get flake and pellet food, and also bloodworms and frozen food-to be "treats". I'm planning to try and keep the pH around 6.5, the dH (or dGH, or hardness, I've seen all three ways) around 13 (how will the Neon Tetras adapt?) and the temperature around 25 C/77 F. Does that sound ok? I just don't know.
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post #2 of 20 Old 07-05-2013, 02:44 PM Thread Starter
Also, what plants would you suggest? Should I stick with just one or two breeds of fish for now? I don't have a very big house, so I can't get a really big tank, probably 20 or 25 gal max.
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post #3 of 20 Old 07-05-2013, 04:16 PM
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With only 20 gallons at your disposal, I would stick with 2 species of schooling fish at the most. I know 20 gallons seems like a lot, but it gets crowded quickly. Larger schools of smaller fish will generally be happier, as well.

Before I comment on fish, what are the parameters of your tap, in regards to PH, GH, and KH? Are they the numbers you listed? Certain fish do best in certain water hardness, tetras and rasboras generally do best in softer water, while platies and other live bearing fish do best in more alkaline water.

When you say 'keep' the numbers at that, what do you mean? Messing with ph/gh/kh can be a bit of a headache, it's a easier to work around your tap water :)
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post #4 of 20 Old 07-05-2013, 05:16 PM Thread Starter
Actually I've changed my mind a little about this, for instance tetras are not for me... because we have hard water in general. The ph ranges from 7.7 to 8.2. and the hardness is 125 ppm, whatever that means. So, what fish would you recommend with thoes numbers that are also easy to care for? Also, I have not actually bought a tank, I will probably get something somewhere from 10 to 20 gal max. Thanks for your feed back!
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post #5 of 20 Old 07-05-2013, 06:49 PM
www.aqadvisor.com will help you with your stocking needs. It will tell you if you have enough filtration, if the fish you select are compatible, the water parameters they enjoy, and any special considerations with species. I use this site religiously before stocking any tank.
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post #6 of 20 Old 07-05-2013, 07:51 PM
Also, now that I've looked at your post a little more closely, a power filter only filter 85gph is not enough for a 20 gallon tank. I would recommend atleast 100gph but 150gph would be more ideal. I like the Marineland Penguins and use them on 3 of my tanks. I like the biowheel and the room to add extra carbon or other media if needed. They run quietly and provide good agitation at the surface for oxygen exchange. They are relatively cost effective as well. They have filter cartridges that go inside them but honestly, I usually end up cutting the carbon out of them (bad for plants but if you dont intend having live plants then it doesn't matter) and just washing out the same old filter in the bucket of old aquarium water after i siphon what I am replacing and the put the cartridge back in. I dont believe I've bought any new cartridges for them and probably won't until the spongy stuff begins to crumble apart.

Now lets talk fish. Do you enjoy live, active fish or more peaceful, docile fish? Do you want egg layers or livebearers? Do you plan on having live plants?
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post #7 of 20 Old 07-05-2013, 07:52 PM
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I just responded in your other thread, so I will repeat some of that. The GH is soft, as 125ppm is about 7 dGH. Your pH might tned to lower, as I doubt the carbonate hardness is high with the GH wehere it is, though that can vary.

I also suggested a 20g rather than the 10g mentioned, so glad to see that is possible.

Most of the fish originally mentioned in post #1 are soft water fish. The platy is the exception, as jentrala said, requiring moderately hard water to be really at their best, so given your water I would forget any livebearers (platy, swordtail, molly, guppy, endler). And as someone said, two species of shoaling fish will be better, plus a fish (group or whatever) for the substrate.

Rasbora should be fine, but get 7-9 of them (I'm assuming the Harlequin Rasbora, see our profile here:
Trigonostigma heteromorpha

Cherry barbs are fine too, again more, say 6-7. Here's their profile:
Puntius titteya

Or the neons would be nice with the rasbora, a group of 8-9.
Corys, minimum 6 is fine, or you could have a couple more, you will have space.

I would recommend sand for the substrate if corys are in the tank. Play sand available from Home Depot or Lowe's or similar places is fine, I use Quikrete brand Play Sand. For plants, pygmy chain sword should work, here's the profile:
Helanthium tenellum

Java Moss attached to some chunks of wood
Taxiphyllum barbieri

Floating plants are very beneficial for fish and water stability. Water Sprite is good
Ceratopteris cornuta
or Brazilian Pennywort
Hydrocotyle leucocephala
allowed to float, or planted in the substrate and left to grow across the surface.

We should discuss the light, this is important with plants.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If youíre going to take it under your wing then youíre responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #8 of 20 Old 07-05-2013, 07:56 PM
And I see my favorite freshwater moderator has replied to you. I will bow out and let the man with the plan give you his excellent wisdom. Taking Byron's advice has never led me astray.
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post #9 of 20 Old 07-05-2013, 08:14 PM
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If you feel uneasy about the tank and want a secure fish to start off with, id recommend danios. Their very hardy and from what I've read they are very adaptable incase of mistakes made while first time fishkeeping(I feel I've made a few errors myself on my tank and their still active and healthy)
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post #10 of 20 Old 07-06-2013, 09:31 AM Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewFishFiend View Post
Also, now that I've looked at your post a little more closely, a power filter only filter 85gph is not enough for a 20 gallon tank. I would recommend atleast 100gph but 150gph would be more ideal.
Ah, I had no clue, but one website I read suggested a power filter for the cories. So that it wouldn't take away all their food I think. But now I don't even know if I will be getting them... They were suggested tank mates for the Harlequin Rasbora.
I like the Marineland Penguins and use them on 3 of my tanks. I like the biowheel and the room to add extra carbon or other media if needed. They run quietly and provide good agitation at the surface for oxygen exchange. They are relatively cost effective as well. They have filter cartridges that go inside them but honestly, I usually end up cutting the carbon out of them (bad for plants but if you dont intend having live plants then it doesn't matter) and just washing out the same old filter in the bucket of old aquarium water after i siphon what I am replacing and the put the cartridge back in. I dont believe I've bought any new cartridges for them and probably won't until the spongy stuff begins to crumble apart.
*Making notes about that* Could you send me a link? Good to know about the carbon thing...

Now lets talk fish. Do you enjoy live, active fish or more peaceful, docile fish? Do you want egg layers or livebearers? Do you plan on having live plants?
I honestly have no clue. (I know that looks like a d, but it is a c l) Live plants do seem like a good idea, although I probably won't do all planted for my first tank I think one or two plants would be nice.
Thanks for the help!
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