Why are some of my fish breathing so hard? - Page 7 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #61 of 65 Old 11-25-2012, 06:37 PM Thread Starter
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Ok...Next time I will know:(I felt horrible.Do you think the 2 Electic Blue Rams are breeding?I have other Balloon Rams in there to but I'm thinking it's these 2.How cute!
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post #62 of 65 Old 11-25-2012, 06:47 PM
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Ok...Next time I will know:(I felt horrible.Do you think the 2 Electic Blue Rams are breeding?I have other Balloon Rams in there to but I'm thinking it's these 2.How cute!
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As these are colour variations of the same species, it may be possible for male/female of both to spawn, I don't know.

The fish closely guarding the eggs is probably the female. The male of the "pair" should be close by defending the general territory, though sometimes this doesn't quite work out. I had a "pair" of the Bolivian that spawned four times. The female aggressively drove the male well away from the eggs the first spawning, then the reverse happened the second spawning. The third and fourth saw the norm, with the female right over the eggs and the subsequent shoal of fry and the male very close by. At that point, not being a bonded pair, the male tired of her and his continual aggression killed her.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #63 of 65 Old 11-25-2012, 06:53 PM Thread Starter
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Oh that's sad.I'm sorry!I bought 2 EBR about a month or so ago and found one dead awhile back.There was one left at the LFS all by itself so I bought that one about 2 weeks ago.She or he was much smaller.These are now the ones producing the eggs..The big one must be the female then?They look both the same.Just one is smaller then the other
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post #64 of 65 Old 11-25-2012, 06:54 PM Thread Starter
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They both take turns guarding the eggs.It's cute!
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post #65 of 65 Old 11-25-2012, 07:08 PM
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Oh that's sad.I'm sorry!I bought 2 EBR about a month or so ago and found one dead awhile back.There was one left at the LFS all by itself so I bought that one about 2 weeks ago.She or he was much smaller.These are now the ones producing the eggs..The big one must be the female then?They look both the same.Just one is smaller then the other
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When we add a fish of the opposite sex to a tank with one fish, they frequently spawn readily, at least for a few times. That's what my Bolivians did. But both species in this genus have to form bonded pairs which remain for life, usually anyway. They select their own mate for this. The male may accept the female you have, or may not; nothing we can do about that.

If the fish are the same age, and are healthy, the larger will be the male. But age and past health affect this, so no certainty. The breeding tube (ovipositor) if it can be seen is the best guide. Check the profile, Blue Ram. [Just noticed, I need to add this to the profile. The ovipositor of the female is thicker (to allow the eggs to pass) that the male.]

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]

Last edited by Byron; 11-25-2012 at 07:11 PM.
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