Where am I? - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
 
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post #1 of 9 Old 09-15-2011, 06:53 AM Thread Starter
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Where am I?

I started a 5.5gal tank on a fishless cycle 24 days ago. My parameters are pH-7.8, NH3-, .25ppm, nitrites >5ppm, and nitrates >160ppm, temp.-78, 3 live plants and a piece of driftwood ( still giving off Tannins ). My question is Why are my nitrates so high but my nitrites are not dropping. They have stayed at 5ppm for the last several days while my NH3 drops and my nitrates climb! Thanks
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post #2 of 9 Old 09-15-2011, 07:35 AM
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have you tested your water source? sometimes that can affect these things.
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post #3 of 9 Old 09-15-2011, 08:24 AM Thread Starter
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It's well water, alkaline, pH 7.7, no nitrites, nitrates or NH3 and hard water.
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post #4 of 9 Old 09-15-2011, 11:02 AM
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I'm not a fan of fishless cycling, I always have live plants so they deal with it best. And as you mention plants, I would do a few things and go with that. But before explaining, what fish are intended for this tank?

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #5 of 9 Old 09-15-2011, 02:47 PM Thread Starter
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Possibly a sparkling gourami and two male guppies or perhaps a school of micro rasboras without the gourami/guppies.
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post #6 of 9 Old 09-15-2011, 03:51 PM
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Originally Posted by crs1945 View Post
Possibly a sparkling gourami and two male guppies or perhaps a school of micro rasboras without the gourami/guppies.
This nitrite stalls seem to be common, there have been a couple of threads on them during fishless cycling. My suggestion would be to do a major water change, get rid of whatever you are using to add ammonia, and make use of the plants. They assimilate ammonia from the fish so with few fish there will be no discernible cycle.

Of the fish you mention, guppy are the better to start with. The sparkling gourami is a bit delicate, and the dwarf rasbora even moreso. I am assuming by micro rasbora you mean Boraras maculatus?

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #7 of 9 Old 09-16-2011, 06:19 AM Thread Starter
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Actually any of the Rasboras, microrasboras,, Boraras or Trigonostigma.I have the book "Mini-Aquariums" by D. Boruchowitz and he gives many good choices for a begininer " nano" aquarist.

Chuck
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post #8 of 9 Old 09-16-2011, 10:51 AM
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Originally Posted by crs1945 View Post
Actually any of the Rasboras, microrasboras,, Boraras or Trigonostigma.I have the book "Mini-Aquariums" by D. Boruchowitz and he gives many good choices for a begininer " nano" aquarist.

Chuck
In a 6g I wouldn't attempt the Trigonstigma species, they need a group of 8-9 (6 can do in a pinch but they definitely do best with more) and more space, a 10g minimum but better in a longer tank. Boraras are ideal, but they need soft water being wild caught; we have two of the present six species in our profiles for more info, they all occur from the same general area.

Microrasbora is correctly speaking a danio, but small and suitable for nano tanks. We have two in our profiles, Danio erythromicron and Danio margaritatus and these do best in slightly basic water. The rasbora/danio group of cyprinids has undergone name changes in recent years as a result of extensive study, this is summarized in our profiles.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #9 of 9 Old 09-16-2011, 02:58 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the info. I have checked the profiles on this site and found them very informative. Thanks again.I really like the CPD. Endlers are also a consideration.

Chuck

Last edited by crs1945; 09-16-2011 at 03:00 PM.
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