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When Winter Break Comes, What To Do With My Fish...

This is a discussion on When Winter Break Comes, What To Do With My Fish... within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Originally Posted by Mikaila31 IMO moving a 29 gallon home for a month then back to school is barely going to be worth the ...

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When Winter Break Comes, What To Do With My Fish...
Old 11-04-2011, 04:56 PM   #11
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikaila31 View Post
IMO moving a 29 gallon home for a month then back to school is barely going to be worth the effort. If it was a 10 or something it would be different. Even though a proper move isn;t going to harm your cycle, you are still going to disrupt the tank. It would likely take a couple weeks to a month for it to rebalance to new waters and then your gonna be close to moving it back. This is going to be hard on your rummies and cories. I personally would find someone to just to minimal maintenance feed twice a week, figure out a way to get one water change done in the middle of the month.

If you do chose to move them, use bags not buckets. Bag them with 2/3 air 1/3 water, don't put too many fish in a bag. Fast the fish for a few days before and don't add any extra chemicals to the bags. Then put the bags in a cooler, if the cooler has extra space you can use some hot water bottles if you want, but this isn't necessary. Keep the cooler closed and dark. A 2 hour drive is nothing really. Bag your filter media the same way as the fish. If you were looking at a really long time in the bags putting a little cube of mature media in each bag is a trick shippers use. The sand and decor I would also bag, or you can bucket it. You can leave the sand in the tank, but its generally not suggested. I've transported many tanks before with weight in them, but I deal generally with pretty cheap used breeder quality tanks. Don't leave any extra water though, the sand is going to stay wet without it. You also don't even need to keep the sand wet or even moist.

I've moved my fair share of tanks. Most all my fish come from auctions though and these tend to last 6 hours or more. During this time all fish are in bags. They are laid out on tables and looked through/picked up by usually a couple hundred people. The vast majority of fish survive this including discus and a lot of young fish fry. My loss rate is normally 0 for whatever I buy and they spend about 8 hours in their bags. Healthy fish can take a lot of stress as long as it is not drawn out over a really long amount of time. Longest fish I've ever had in a bag were my 6 panda garras and they spent 4 days in the mail.

I've never really watched light adjustment. Most my tanks go from very dark to very bright instantly every morning when the lights come on.

Correctly done there should be no disruption of the cycle, however a cycled tank is not the same as a balanced or mature tank. Your loosing both of the latter when you move a tank.
There is no way for me to find anyone to feed at all. It is a small college town and when break starts...everyone goes home. All of my friends are going home and there is not going to be anyone that I know here in town to do such a thing...
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Old 11-07-2011, 12:14 PM   #12
 
I'm thinking about moving the whole tank now. Seems like the only option for me at this point. I will bag the fish in a styrofoam container along with the filter media. How many fish should I put in each bag? I have 5 Black Skirts, 5 Peppered Corys, and 7 Rummy Nose Tetras. And can I leave the sand in the bottom of the tank while I move it? Anything else I need to know for the moving process?
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Old 11-07-2011, 10:37 PM   #13
 
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Originally Posted by JordynMurdock View Post
I'm thinking about moving the whole tank now. Seems like the only option for me at this point. I will bag the fish in a styrofoam container along with the filter media. How many fish should I put in each bag? I have 5 Black Skirts, 5 Peppered Corys, and 7 Rummy Nose Tetras. And can I leave the sand in the bottom of the tank while I move it? Anything else I need to know for the moving process?
i would leave the sand and about 3 or 4 in of water
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Old 11-09-2011, 05:24 PM   #14
 
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i would leave the sand and about 3 or 4 in of water
I heard that leaving any substrate/water in while moving a tank can crack the glass or break the seal leading to future disaster...I was thinking about leaving the sand and a little water and then moving the tank with a board underneath it so that there would be no pressure going down on the glass without something holding the weight.
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Old 11-09-2011, 07:24 PM   #15
 
Do not transport any water in the tank. IDEALLY you should scoop MOST the sand into a bucket. TBH this is going to be the safest and easiest way. Picking up an moving a tank is much easier when it is lighter, substrate is a lot heavier then it seems. With 1" of sand you are at probably ~30 pounds of sand. This weight is very little compared to the ~250lbs the tank holds when it is full of water. Tanks are often awkward to move and the extra weight doesn't help. If you remove the sand you also don't risk stressing the seams by the constantly shifting force of the sand on the tank when you are driving. As far as I understand it, its not the weight going down on the base pane thats the issue. Its the varying force of the sand pushing against the side panes as you accelerate/deaccelerate.

That said I have moved many tanks with weight in them before. In the end what it really comes down to is how much is at stake in the unlikely event that the tank can not hold water. I'll often move smaller tanks below 15 gallons with weight in them.

I don't think the board is going to have much of any effect. Almost all tanks in the US are floating base tanks. Usually there is a plastic rim around the base of the tank that raises the bottom pane off the ground. This means the weight of the tank is all transferred through the rim.

IMO you should really just put the sand in a bucket or big unscented garbage bag if your cheap like me lol. You don't need to get all of it out, just most of it. It really does not take very long at all and you will be glad you did in the long run. Removing the sand will not effect the tanks stability when you set it back up .

As far as how many fish per bag, that depends on the size of bags you use. Either way less is more. Pick a cooler to use and estimate how many bags you can fit in it. Then if you want a bag of hot/warm water. If you do want to use warm water put the rummies closest as they are the most sensitive fish you are moving.

Last edited by Mikaila31; 11-09-2011 at 07:31 PM..
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