What is your temperature in your tank? - Page 4 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #31 of 38 Old 02-17-2011, 06:45 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Lupin View Post
LMAO! You made my night, Marie.
Oh, I am so glad!


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Originally Posted by SinCrisis View Post
Its a joke from a japanese cartoon. When the cartoon was brought into the US, the American voice actors dubbed over the Japanese and "It's over 9000!" was a line. It was done overly enthusiastically to the point of it sounding hilairous and the sheer ridiculousness of the number in context to the rest of the show made it a running joke among people who know of the cartoon.
How old are you? My son was into all of that ~ thanks for trying to make me get into that loop.


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Originally Posted by Knifegill View Post
58º for my native marine tank.

70º for my crayfish

75º for my paradise fish and mosquito fish

78-80 for the rest.

Quite a variety of temps there. Tanks for sharing!

_______________________
~ Marie ~


125 gallon ~ fake plants I'm a "fakie") ( thanks, Kym

3 Neon Tetras
13 Rummy Nose Tetras
2 Swordtails
6 Rasporas


QT: ( 2.20 )

4 Roseline Sharks
1 Black Mollies
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post #32 of 38 Old 02-18-2011, 08:56 PM
im 23...

Also my tank temps are around 80-82F.
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post #33 of 38 Old 02-19-2011, 11:40 AM
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Temperature can be crucial to healthy fish. Marie, you posted in another thread about your neons dying, at 82F this is quite likely to occur. And SinCrisis, what fish do you have at 80+ F?

One of the things that must be considered when acquiring fish for a community (= more than one species in the tank) is temperature. This comes under the heading of water parameters. Fish in a tank should share very similar water [parameters. You cannot compromise. Some fish can "manage" within certain ranges, others cannot.

Temperature differences of only a couple degrees can be very significant to a fish. Fish cannot regulate their body temperature as we (mammals) can, so they are bound by their environment and their biological actions will change at different temperatures. If the variations in temperature are natural, such as cooling during darkness and warming during the daylight, there is no problem. But if the temperature is outside this range, the fish can be stressed which weakens the immune system, and this brings on health issues that would otherwise probably not occur. And a shorter life expectancy.

In our profiles the optimum temperature range is given for each species; optimum means this temperature range is best for this species. Some may tolerate higher or lower temperatures than the optimum range, but usually only for short period, not permanently.

Maintaining white clouds at "normal" aquarium temperatures speeds up their biology and leads to shorter lives and probable health issues along the way. Neon tetra occur in cooler mountain streams, 77F is the absolute maximum for this species to keep it in good health. Discus and the common or blue ram would suffer at this low a temperature. These are just random examples. It is vital for the health of the fish to have the aquarium temperature within the optimum range, and when combining different species this must be remembered.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #34 of 38 Old 02-19-2011, 11:48 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Byron View Post
Marie, you posted in another thread about your neons dying, at 82F this is quite likely to occur.

I never stated my tank is 82F. It is 75F.


Thanks for the advice, though!

_______________________
~ Marie ~


125 gallon ~ fake plants I'm a "fakie") ( thanks, Kym

3 Neon Tetras
13 Rummy Nose Tetras
2 Swordtails
6 Rasporas


QT: ( 2.20 )

4 Roseline Sharks
1 Black Mollies
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post #35 of 38 Old 02-19-2011, 11:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
Temperature can be crucial to healthy fish. Marie, you posted in another thread about your neons dying, at 82F this is quite likely to occur. And SinCrisis, what fish do you have at 80+ F?

One of the things that must be considered when acquiring fish for a community (= more than one species in the tank) is temperature. This comes under the heading of water parameters. Fish in a tank should share very similar water [parameters. You cannot compromise. Some fish can "manage" within certain ranges, others cannot.

Temperature differences of only a couple degrees can be very significant to a fish. Fish cannot regulate their body temperature as we (mammals) can, so they are bound by their environment and their biological actions will change at different temperatures. If the variations in temperature are natural, such as cooling during darkness and warming during the daylight, there is no problem. But if the temperature is outside this range, the fish can be stressed which weakens the immune system, and this brings on health issues that would otherwise probably not occur. And a shorter life expectancy.

In our profiles the optimum temperature range is given for each species; optimum means this temperature range is best for this species. Some may tolerate higher or lower temperatures than the optimum range, but usually only for short period, not permanently.

Maintaining white clouds at "normal" aquarium temperatures speeds up their biology and leads to shorter lives and probable health issues along the way. Neon tetra occur in cooler mountain streams, 77F is the absolute maximum for this species to keep it in good health. Discus and the common or blue ram would suffer at this low a temperature. These are just random examples. It is vital for the health of the fish to have the aquarium temperature within the optimum range, and when combining different species this must be remembered.

Byron.
+1. This is exactly how I ended up with two large tanks instead of one. I wanted to keep Densions and also Discus. Even though the two can get along fine personality wise, they can't get along temperature wise. Denison high is 77, Discus low is 80. This is just enough of a difference to make it not workable, to me anyway. Besides, it gave me another excuse to set up a tank, tee hee. I see alot of people combining these two species, I suppose the temptation to put all that "color" together is just too inviting. As much as I wanted to do it (they look so nice together, aesthetically), I just couldn't do it to the fish.

If you don't stand up for something you'll fall for anything...
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post #36 of 38 Old 02-20-2011, 04:56 PM
I keep pristella tetras, 1 bolivian ram, 2 black skirt tetras and 2 amano shrimp. They seem fine, but Ive turned my temps down to 76-78.
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post #37 of 38 Old 02-20-2011, 05:43 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by SweetPoison View Post
I never stated my tank is 82F. It is 75F.


Thanks for the advice, though!

Actually, just checked it is 77. oops.
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post #38 of 38 Old 02-20-2011, 08:08 PM
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Originally Posted by SinCrisis View Post
I keep pristella tetras, 1 bolivian ram, 2 black skirt tetras and 2 amano shrimp. They seem fine, but Ive turned my temps down to 76-78.
These will be better at 76-78F. They can manage higher, but why burn them out? Higher temps mean fish are using more oxygen and burning more energy, which can weaken them and shorten their lifespan as well. If it is needed for the species, that's quite a different kettle of fish.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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