What will eat this algae? - Page 2
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Beginner Freshwater Aquarium » What will eat this algae?

What will eat this algae?

This is a discussion on What will eat this algae? within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Straight off the top of my head I'm going to say lighting is your issue. 65 watts over a 15gl is way too much ...

Check out these freshwater fish profiles
Golden Tetra
Golden Tetra
Banded Gourami
Banded Gourami
Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
What will eat this algae?
Old 03-06-2011, 11:18 AM   #11
 
aunt kymmie's Avatar
 
Straight off the top of my head I'm going to say lighting is your issue. 65 watts over a 15gl is way too much light. If you change your lighting set up, manually remove all the cyano that you can, and keep on top of weekly water changes I'm sure that will set up an environment that the cyano is alot less likley to reproduce in. I predict changing youe lighting will solve the cyano issue. Once you have the proper lighting (a full spectrum (6500K) 20 watt bulb should do just fine) it's ok to leave the lights on for a longer period, ten hours would be fine.

Last edited by aunt kymmie; 03-06-2011 at 11:20 AM..
aunt kymmie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2011, 06:10 PM   #12
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aunt kymmie View Post
Straight off the top of my head I'm going to say lighting is your issue. 65 watts over a 15gl is way too much light. If you change your lighting set up, manually remove all the cyano that you can, and keep on top of weekly water changes I'm sure that will set up an environment that the cyano is alot less likley to reproduce in. I predict changing youe lighting will solve the cyano issue. Once you have the proper lighting (a full spectrum (6500K) 20 watt bulb should do just fine) it's ok to leave the lights on for a longer period, ten hours would be fine.
Ok, looking over downgrade options and ran into a snag. In the CF straight-pin category, I can't find anything under 55W at the 21" size. Since I don't want to unevenly light my tank using a really short bulb, the best option seems to be a new fixture.

So thinking, maybe I can turn this situation into an upgrade by going LED. Would the 400 Lumens version of this strike the right balance: Our Products? I want to make sure my plants will still be happy.

Also, I was reading up on controlling algae & cyanobacteria. Seems I may be able to keep my lighting if I can get the phosphates under control. Sounds like mixing tap with RO water at water changes would help that greatly. That would be easy enough since I already have RO water handy.

Or maybe it is best if I do both? 8)
shunyata is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2011, 06:15 PM   #13
 
aunt kymmie's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by shunyata View Post
Ok, looking over downgrade options and ran into a snag. In the CF straight-pin category, I can't find anything under 55W at the 21" size. Since I don't want to unevenly light my tank using a really short bulb, the best option seems to be a new fixture.

So thinking, maybe I can turn this situation into an upgrade by going LED. Would the 400 Lumens version of this strike the right balance: Our Products? I want to make sure my plants will still be happy.

Also, I was reading up on controlling algae & cyanobacteria. Seems I may be able to keep my lighting if I can get the phosphates under control. Sounds like mixing tap with RO water at water changes would help that greatly. That would be easy enough since I already have RO water handy.

Or maybe it is best if I do both? 8)
Have you done a test for phosphates? An outbreak of cyano doesn't always mean high phosphates in the tank. My tank tested zero and still I had the creepy slimy crud all over my plants.
I know nothing about the LEDs, sorry. I still think using 55/65 watts is way over kill on this tank. Out of curiosity, how long was the tank set up until you noticed the cyano outbreak??
aunt kymmie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2011, 06:43 PM   #14
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aunt kymmie View Post
Have you done a test for phosphates? An outbreak of cyano doesn't always mean high phosphates in the tank. My tank tested zero and still I had the creepy slimy crud all over my plants.
I know nothing about the LEDs, sorry. I still think using 55/65 watts is way over kill on this tank. Out of curiosity, how long was the tank set up until you noticed the cyano outbreak??
Phosphates are above 1, but below 2ppm. So 'too high' if what I've been reading is accurate. My tap water tests above 0, but below 0.25ppm. Rather surprised the API test has such a wide range considering the ideal target is 0.05ppm.

Tank was about 6-7 months old when I first noticed it; roughly a month ago.

Manged to get the last visible bits out today. *tiny victory dance* :)
shunyata is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2011, 07:25 PM   #15
 
I've read using old bulbs can cause algae blooms. Considering this bulb was used when I got it and it's been a few months, maybe all I need is replace it with a new 55W 6700k bulb (can't find 6500k in CF)? Does that sound ok, or is it still too bright?

Another option is to go over to T5s. I found a freshwater-specific light that may do the trick. It's by AquaticLife and has a 24W 6000k bulb, and a 650nm 'red' bulb. Or is 48W still too much? *hehe*

Last edited by shunyata; 03-06-2011 at 07:40 PM..
shunyata is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2011, 08:58 PM   #16
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Kymmie asked me to look into this thread, and having read through it, I would say the very excessive light caused the cyanobacteria bloom. I've had this too.

On a 15g tank the most light you would need is one T8 fluorescent tube (I had this over my 15g years ago) or, probably better and certainly cheaper, an incandescent fixture with two screw-in bulbs, and use two 10w 6500K Daylight bulbs like GE makes. I have this over my 10g and 20g and the plants are thriving. And there is no cyano either.

Are you using any fertilizer for the plants?

The problem with your existing light is that is is not only too much intensity (to balance the nutrients) but depending upon the spectrum it is probably too much blue and not sufficient red. Plants need red and blue, nothing else. The GE daylight bulbs with 6500K are well suited to plants. And an incandescent fixture is much less expensive than anything else.

Cyano is caused by high organics in the presence of light. Sufficient plants could use the organics and light if all nutrients were present (hence my question on ferts) but this has a cap and the excessive light is beyond that. The duckweed probably helped or it would be even worse; this plant is astounding at consuming nutrients.

Byron.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Byron For This Useful Post:
shunyata (03-06-2011)
Old 03-06-2011, 09:22 PM   #17
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
Kymmie asked me to look into this thread, and having read through it, I would say the very excessive light caused the cyanobacteria bloom. I've had this too.

On a 15g tank the most light you would need is one T8 fluorescent tube (I had this over my 15g years ago) or, probably better and certainly cheaper, an incandescent fixture with two screw-in bulbs, and use two 10w 6500K Daylight bulbs like GE makes. I have this over my 10g and 20g and the plants are thriving. And there is no cyano either.

Are you using any fertilizer for the plants?

The problem with your existing light is that is is not only too much intensity (to balance the nutrients) but depending upon the spectrum it is probably too much blue and not sufficient red. Plants need red and blue, nothing else. The GE daylight bulbs with 6500K are well suited to plants. And an incandescent fixture is much less expensive than anything else.

Cyano is caused by high organics in the presence of light. Sufficient plants could use the organics and light if all nutrients were present (hence my question on ferts) but this has a cap and the excessive light is beyond that. The duckweed probably helped or it would be even worse; this plant is astounding at consuming nutrients.

Byron.
No fertilizers.

I totally get that the spectrum is off. What I don't get is the idea that 15-20W is enough. Those Red Tiger Lotus are my centerpiece and need 'medium-high lighting'. I've been told by many others this means 2-4wpg. That translates out to 30-60W.

If I didn't have this plant, I'd agree with your recommendation. But everything I've read and been told up to this point says that its is just not enough. I hope you can see why I'm so confused here.

Can you say with complete confidence that dropping my lighting so low won't kill my Lotus? Will it ever bloom under such low light?

Last edited by shunyata; 03-06-2011 at 09:33 PM..
shunyata is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2011, 09:39 PM   #18
 
aunt kymmie's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by shunyata View Post
No fertilizers.

I totally get that the spectrum is off. What I don't get is the idea that 15-20W is enough. Those Red Tiger Lotus are my centerpiece and need 'medium-high lighting'. I've been told by many others this means 2-4wpg. That translates out to 30-60W.

If I didn't have this plant, I'd agree with your recommendation. But everything I've read and been told up to this point says that its is just not enough. I hope you can see why I'm so confused here.

Can you say with complete confidence that dropping my lighting so low won't kill my Lotus?

I want them to bloom! They've thrown off three lily pads and I'm told it should flower soon.
Well, I have Red Tiger Lotus (one on each end) in my 75gl and they are doing great. Nice big red leaves. I always cut the ones that extend to the surface like lilypads because I want the plant to be bushier. I've never seen a Tiger Lotus flower, I'll have to go google that.
I have a T8, triple tube fixture (6500k) for a total of 96 watts over this tank. So what's that equal to, 1.28 watts per gallon??
aunt kymmie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2011, 10:01 PM   #19
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aunt kymmie View Post
Well, I have Red Tiger Lotus (one on each end) in my 75gl and they are doing great. Nice big red leaves. I always cut the ones that extend to the surface like lilypads because I want the plant to be bushier. I've never seen a Tiger Lotus flower, I'll have to go google that.
I have a T8, triple tube fixture (6500k) for a total of 96 watts over this tank. So what's that equal to, 1.28 watts per gallon??
Ok, now I'm a believer in the lower wattage being enough. *heh*

The lilypads are a good sign. I'm told those are the plant's way of finding the surface so it can throw up a flower. You won't get blooms if you cut them off.
shunyata is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2011, 10:19 PM   #20
 
aunt kymmie's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by shunyata View Post
Ok, now I'm a believer in the lower wattage being enough. *heh*

The lilypads are a good sign. I'm told those are the plant's way of finding the surface so it can throw up a flower. You won't get blooms if you cut them off.
Really? I cut them off everytime! Besides cutting them off because I want to encourage the plant to be bushier I've always thought that the lilypads floating on the surface will block light out for the other plants. Ok, off to google the flower to see if it's worth it to stop cutting off the lilypads.
aunt kymmie is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Algae vs. other plants - If it's ok to plant a tank, what's the prob. with Algae? KatG Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 5 11-08-2010 09:46 AM
Is Algae all that bad? PaperclipGirl Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 8 04-09-2010 01:25 PM
fur-like algae princesuhaib Beginner Saltwater Aquariums 0 04-30-2009 03:26 PM
ALGAE burch76 Water Chemistry 1 03-06-2007 01:14 AM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:38 PM.