what are some good numbers for my 10 gallon?
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what are some good numbers for my 10 gallon?

This is a discussion on what are some good numbers for my 10 gallon? within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> so after moving my maniac endler that killed 5 cpds and atleast 1 pygmy cory. im left with 1 cpd and 3 pygmy corys(could ...

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what are some good numbers for my 10 gallon?
Old 07-26-2012, 01:09 PM   #1
 
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what are some good numbers for my 10 gallon?

so after moving my maniac endler that killed 5 cpds and atleast 1 pygmy cory. im left with 1 cpd and 3 pygmy corys(could be more, but ive only seen three at a time). well i dont actually know if it was the endler but it was chasing fish around so i moved it in with my adfs (only other tank it wouldnt get eatin). so anyway what could i do with numbers for the following fish?
cpds
pygmy corys
endlers
scarlet badis (if i can only have endlers or scarlet badis id rather have the badis)
tank has an aquatech 5-15 and is heavily planted with rotala r. silver cabomba a hydro or hygro species i forgot the name of (looks like clovers) and stargrass.
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Old 07-26-2012, 02:30 PM   #2
 
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From what I've read, the Badis are best in a species-only tank - but regardless, you're choice in fish are covering a bit of a range in needs as far as water parameters. Do you know what your Gh and Ph are? This is the first thing. . . from there I'm sure you'll get a lot of help on which to pick
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Old 07-26-2012, 03:57 PM   #3
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chesherca View Post
From what I've read, the Badis are best in a species-only tank - but regardless, you're choice in fish are covering a bit of a range in needs as far as water parameters. Do you know what your Gh and Ph are? This is the first thing. . . from there I'm sure you'll get a lot of help on which to pick
ive never fooled with gh. i believe my ph is 7.8. ive always heard that fish can addapt to ph. all of these fish will come from a local fish store.
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Old 07-26-2012, 04:30 PM   #4
 
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Hmmm, it's worth looking into. You can get a Gh/Kh test kit by API for around $7, or you might be able to find out this information from your water company. Water hardness can actually make a huge difference in many cases - there are many fish that simply will not do very well in the wrong type of water. . . regardless of where you purchased them from. In many cases the fish kept in your LFS will have been shipped to them, so you can't be sure of the type of water they were born/raised in, and they don't generally stay long IN the LFS, so there isn't really any way for you to be able to tell if they're doing as well as you think over the course of time. . . :)
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Old 07-26-2012, 04:34 PM   #5
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chesherca View Post
From what I've read, the Badis are best in a species-only tank - but regardless, you're choice in fish are covering a bit of a range in needs as far as water parameters. Do you know what your Gh and Ph are? This is the first thing. . . from there I'm sure you'll get a lot of help on which to pick
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chesherca View Post
Hmmm, it's worth looking into. You can get a Gh/Kh test kit by API for around $7, or you might be able to find out this information from your water company. Water hardness can actually make a huge difference in many cases - there are many fish that simply will not do very well in the wrong type of water. . . regardless of where you purchased them from. In many cases the fish kept in your LFS will have been shipped to them, so you can't be sure of the type of water they were born/raised in, and they don't generally stay long IN the LFS, so there isn't really any way for you to be able to tell if they're doing as well as you think over the course of time. . . :)
well i believe that if properly acclimated fish can adapt.
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Old 07-26-2012, 05:05 PM   #6
 
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I think it depends on the species. In some cases this may be the case, but certainly not all... there are some very fussy fishies out there! Personally, I like to *try* to keep fish that originally would have come from an environment that matches conditions in my tap - more or less - as I'm convinced that this allows them to feel their best.

Either way, good luck on the stocking!
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Old 07-26-2012, 05:13 PM   #7
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chesherca View Post
I think it depends on the species. In some cases this may be the case, but certainly not all... there are some very fussy fishies out there! Personally, I like to *try* to keep fish that originally would have come from an environment that matches conditions in my tap - more or less - as I'm convinced that this allows them to feel their best.

Either way, good luck on the stocking!
the fish have never seen the wild.
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Old 07-26-2012, 07:57 PM   #8
 
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Adaptability has limits, more than some well-meaning aquarists recognize. Earlier this afternoon, I was reading through the August issue of TFH that came in my mail today, and one of the freshwater Q&A items was this very question. I can't say it much better, so I will cite the answer.
I hope I haven't created the impression that water parameters such as pH and hardness aren't important. The only point I've tried to make is that fish that have been bred in captivity for many years tend to be more adaptable with respect to water chemistry than their wild counterparts, so hobbyists who are keeping captive-bred specimens of these species don't necessarily need to worry if their water chemistry falls outside the values that prevail in the species' natural range. Nevertheless, I think it's still helpful to have this information because, despite being adaptable, even species that have been bred for years in captivity tend to thrive best, display their best colors, and breed more successfully in water conditions that are as close to natural as possible.
In my experience, GH is the more critical factor. Soft water fish often live much shorter lives in water that is harder than their preference; but it is only a postmortem dissection that will show the cause to have been calcium blockage of internal organs as the cause of death. And this occurs from the harder water that the fish simply is not designed to live in.

The pH is also important, when one considers that the fish must continually regulate the pH of its blood to match the environment water, and this can take a toll too. In very general terms, a pH on the acid or basic side of 7 is more important than a pH a few degrees up or down within these two areas.

The Scarlet Badis is almost certain to be wild caught. The Celestial Pearl Danio may be wild or may be captive-bred. Endlers Livebearer must have hard, basic water, no matter where they originate. Without the mineral content, they will not last. You can read more in our profiles of the respective fish, click the shaded names. Aside from the water, I would not myself recommend livebearers with either the Badis or CPD; Endlers are much more active that the Badis, and too similar to the CPD.

Byron.

Last edited by Byron; 07-26-2012 at 08:01 PM..
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Old 07-26-2012, 08:07 PM   #9
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
Adaptability has limits, more than some well-meaning aquarists recognize. Earlier this afternoon, I was reading through the August issue of TFH that came in my mail today, and one of the freshwater Q&A items was this very question. I can't say it much better, so I will cite the answer.
I hope I haven't created the impression that water parameters such as pH and hardness aren't important. The only point I've tried to make is that fish that have been bred in captivity for many years tend to be more adaptable with respect to water chemistry than their wild counterparts, so hobbyists who are keeping captive-bred specimens of these species don't necessarily need to worry if their water chemistry falls outside the values that prevail in the species' natural range. Nevertheless, I think it's still helpful to have this information because, despite being adaptable, even species that have been bred for years in captivity tend to thrive best, display their best colors, and breed more successfully in water conditions that are as close to natural as possible.
In my experience, GH is the more critical factor. Soft water fish often live much shorter lives in water that is harder than their preference; but it is only a postmortem dissection that will show the cause to have been calcium blockage of internal organs as the cause of death. And this occurs from the harder water that the fish simply is not designed to live in.

The pH is also important, when one considers that the fish must continually regulate the pH of its blood to match the environment water, and this can take a toll too. In very general terms, a pH on the acid or basic side of 7 is more important than a pH a few degrees up or down within these two areas.

The Scarlet Badis is almost certain to be wild caught. The Celestial Pearl Danio may be wild or may be captive-bred. Endlers Livebearer must have hard, basic water, no matter where they originate. Without the mineral content, they will not last. You can read more in our profiles of the respective fish, click the shaded names. Aside from the water, I would not myself recommend livebearers with either the Badis or CPD; Endlers are much more active that the Badis, and too similar to the CPD.

Byron.
could i do the cpds, badis, and pygmy corys together?
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Old 07-26-2012, 08:21 PM   #10
 
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Originally Posted by allaboutfish View Post
could i do the cpds, badis, and pygmy corys together?
Yes, in a larger tank. I think the 10g is going to be too confined for the CPD and Badis badis. I have this fish, although it has slowly dissappeared over several months until I am left with just one, most likely a feeding issue. This fish is not easy to feed, requiring live foods initially; it may accept frozen (mine were, or so i thought) but prepared foods like flake and similar may not be taken.

Although the profile recommends more space for a larger group of CPD, I would myself try a group of say 7 in a well planted 10g--and very well planted, thick with plants. A group of 7-9 pygmy cory would be fine, if your GH is not too high. And with sand substrate.

One other advantage of a thickly planted tank is live food; it will be present, and all these named fish will eat it as they find it. Microscopic plankton and aufwuchs is a prime source of food for all the "dwarf" cyprinid fishes, and the cory dwarf species too.

Byron.
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