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What should my next fish be?

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What should my next fish be?
Old 04-09-2012, 08:26 PM   #11
 
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Yes, ammonia and nitrite should be zero. The plants should stabilize this.

On the fish, the cory and tetra should be increased (assuming you want these species), but wait for those numbers to drop.
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Old 04-10-2012, 04:46 PM   #12
 
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Once the plants are established, add fish a few at a time. In another thread plants were mentinoed, some are stem plants and these are fast growers so very good at removing ammonia.

Don't know the GH and pH of your tap water yet, so hard to say which fish.

GH 60
KH 40

Thanks!!!!!
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Old 04-10-2012, 04:56 PM   #13
 
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GH 60
KH 40

Thanks!!!!!
I just posted in the other thread on this, suggesting you mix a bit more tap in to up the GH to 5 or 6. And this is soft water, at either number, so soft water fish. Tetra, rasbora, dwarf cichlids, angelfish, most catfish... almost anything except livebearers and rift lake cichlids and a few cyprinids.
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Old 04-10-2012, 05:07 PM   #14
 
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Not to sound like an idiot... But I am.... But what is a "livebearer" sorry.... :)
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Old 04-10-2012, 05:35 PM   #15
 
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Not to sound like an idiot... But I am.... But what is a "livebearer" sorry.... :)
You can find this in the profiles, check the Livebearer section...but I'll answer your question. Guppy, platy, swordtail, molly, and gambusia are the more common livebearers; a few much rarer fish are sometimes seen.

These fish bear live young, hence their common name. But they all occur in medium hard to hard water. The general intro in the profiles explains this and some of their traits:
Livebearers
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Old 04-12-2012, 01:34 PM   #16
 
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Not to sound like an idiot... But I am.... But what is a "livebearer" sorry.... :)
Live bearers reproduce like mad rabbits. Be careful with stocking them.

Also a great guide to help keep you knowledgeable on your stocking levels and filtration is this website: www.aqadvisior.com

It is just a good guide to go by. Just select your tank size, Filter and fish. I would recommend you stay under the 100% stocking level.

--

Byron mentioned plants to you on another thread I was reading. I think Java Fern and Java Moss are two really easy plants to start with and they are low Light.

Good luck and nice tank so far! I like the look of those LEDs.
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Old 04-12-2012, 03:54 PM   #17
 
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Live bearers reproduce like mad rabbits. Be careful with stocking them.

Also a great guide to help keep you knowledgeable on your stocking levels and filtration is this website: www.aqadvisior.com

It is just a good guide to go by. Just select your tank size, Filter and fish. I would recommend you stay under the 100% stocking level.

--

Byron mentioned plants to you on another thread I was reading. I think Java Fern and Java Moss are two really easy plants to start with and they are low Light.

Good luck and nice tank so far! I like the look of those LEDs.
Great site.... fun to play with....

Ok so I have a question... It says that I need to add more cory more catfish and more tetras. I assume becuase those fish are much happier in groups. My question is can you add other kinds of Cory other kinds of Tetra or Catfish. Because the site says that I need to add more of the SAME kinds of those fish.... JEDI MASTER BYRON feel free to chime in on this one.
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Old 04-12-2012, 03:58 PM   #18
 
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tetras, I'd say the same species. Cories, I bet cories of the same size would be okay.
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Old 04-12-2012, 03:59 PM   #19
 
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Great site.... fun to play with....

Ok so I have a question... It says that I need to add more cory more catfish and more tetras. I assume becuase those fish are much happier in groups. My question is can you add other kinds of Cory other kinds of Tetra or Catfish. Because the site says that I need to add more of the SAME kinds of those fish.... JEDI MASTER BYRON feel free to chime in on this one.
Byron is the Aquarium Jedi Lord

I would recommend having at the very least 6 of any schooling fish. As always, the more the better.

Cardinals and Neons are usually fine together, they really look alike. Other then that I would say stick with the same species. They will be happier and healthier that way.

One of the things I found out later, that I didn't really notice before, is that Large schools of the same fish are beautiful. They end up just moving along the tank like one giant entity. I would recommend doing one large species school.

If you find a good video of a nice decent sized tank online you will see what i mean. I think it looks better than 2-3 or even 5 smaller schools of fish.
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Old 04-12-2012, 04:25 PM   #20
 
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The size of the group is actually a factor in determining the lifespan of the fish. It relates to stress [another prod at that article I am working on in between my posts]. This applies to all shoaling fish. They simply have an inherent need to be in a group of their own species, and if they are not, they exhibit heightened stress that becomes chronic, and this always means a shorter lifespan even if no other health issues occur (which they usually do). Science has now (for the first time) carried out some research that indicates the number 5 or 6 as being the crucial minimum for many species, and these studies looked at increased aggression resulting from small groups. One thing is certain, the more the merrier because the healthier--i.e., less stress--the fish will be.

Corys seem to do best in groups of 5 per species [can't remember which ichthyologist noted this, could have been Dr. David Sands], but unlike characins, mixed species do seem to play into this, as redchigh mentioned. Which is why I usually suggest 3 minimum of each species when there are 2 or more species. Though 5 or more of each is not going to hurt, if space allows. I have had many years of observation with multiple cory species. At one time I had some 60-70 corys of a dozen or more species in my 90g and 115g tanks. Presently I have about 30 from 12 species in my 115g. And my cory fry that appear now and then tell me they must be satisfied.

Byron.
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