What should my next fish be? - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #1 of 20 Old 04-08-2012, 07:56 PM Thread Starter
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What should my next fish be?

Right now:
two Emerald Cory
one Dalmation Molly
one Glass Catfish
one X-ray Tetra

I am not going to be adding any fish to my tank until my water clears and the plants have established.

I would like to add hardy fish... I would also love to add some color. I was told that the fish that I have would do ok with Semi-Agressive fish, is that the case?

Anyway just excited that my tank is not brown anymore.... and getting excited... but patiently excited... to grow my fish community.

Thanks ahead of time for your input.

Christian
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post #2 of 20 Old 04-08-2012, 08:09 PM
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att least one more cory
at least 2 more glass catfish
at least 2 more x-ray tetra

Almost all of those fish are grouping fish at least 3, recomended 5+
If you dont have enough room, give some back to the store, they need to be in groups
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post #3 of 20 Old 04-08-2012, 08:13 PM
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How many gallons?
Guppies are hardy colorful fish, but unless you want millions of them, don't put males and females together.
Cardinal tetras are semi-hardy colorful little fish as well
platys, mollies, swordtails also are
For something larger, get some honey gouramis, not the dwarfs unless you have a 25+ gallon tank, they can get aggressive if not given enough space
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post #4 of 20 Old 04-08-2012, 09:54 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by fishyy View Post
att least one more cory
at least 2 more glass catfish
at least 2 more x-ray tetra

Almost all of those fish are grouping fish at least 3, recomended 5+
If you dont have enough room, give some back to the store, they need to be in groups
I have a 46 gallon tank..... Still a good idea?
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post #5 of 20 Old 04-09-2012, 10:25 AM
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Originally Posted by Macrocosm View Post
Right now:
two Emerald Cory
one Dalmation Molly
one Glass Catfish
one X-ray Tetra

I am not going to be adding any fish to my tank until my water clears and the plants have established.

I would like to add hardy fish... I would also love to add some color. I was told that the fish that I have would do ok with Semi-Agressive fish, is that the case?

Anyway just excited that my tank is not brown anymore.... and getting excited... but patiently excited... to grow my fish community.

Thanks ahead of time for your input.

Christian
I didn't comment on the fish in my posts in the other thread as I didn't want to get into another subject with the problems you had. So now, here we go.

We have fish profiles, second tab from the left in the blue bar across the top of the page. If the scientific or common name is used in a post identical to the name in the profile, it will shade, as Glass Catfish did in your post. This means you can click the shaded name and see that species' profile. Info on water parameters, numbers (for shoaling fish), tank sizes, compatibility, etc. is included.

As you'll see from the Glass Catfish, it has specific needs with respect to water parameters, being soft water. Livebearers are medium hard basic water, so the two are not a good mix as someone is going to suffer. You also need a group, 5-6 of the Glass, and it needs lots of plants for security. A skittish fish.

Common Molly definitely must have hard water, as noted in the profile.

The Cory (if that is Corydoras aeneus or Brochis splendens, whichever) is adaptable, as is the Pristella Tetra, to slightly acidic or slightly basic water. Both are shoaling so a group is needed, 3-5 of the cory and 6+ of the Pristella.

If you know your tap water hardness and pH, it will be easier to decide on fish. The GH you can find out from the water supply folks, they may have a website. pH you can test, shake the water briskly to de-gas CO2 before testing tap water pH.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If youíre going to take it under your wing then youíre responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #6 of 20 Old 04-09-2012, 10:42 AM Thread Starter
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Thank you again for your help.... My god you all are amazing. How long did it take you to learn all of this stuff? I am continually in awe!

Thanks again!
Christian....
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post #7 of 20 Old 04-09-2012, 07:10 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Byron View Post
I didn't comment on the fish in my posts in the other thread as I didn't want to get into another subject with the problems you had. So now, here we go.

We have fish profiles, second tab from the left in the blue bar across the top of the page. If the scientific or common name is used in a post identical to the name in the profile, it will shade, as Glass Catfish did in your post. This means you can click the shaded name and see that species' profile. Info on water parameters, numbers (for shoaling fish), tank sizes, compatibility, etc. is included.

As you'll see from the Glass Catfish, it has specific needs with respect to water parameters, being soft water. Livebearers are medium hard basic water, so the two are not a good mix as someone is going to suffer. You also need a group, 5-6 of the Glass, and it needs lots of plants for security. A skittish fish.

Common Molly definitely must have hard water, as noted in the profile.

The Cory (if that is Corydoras aeneus or Brochis splendens, whichever) is adaptable, as is the Pristella Tetra, to slightly acidic or slightly basic water. Both are shoaling so a group is needed, 3-5 of the cory and 6+ of the Pristella.

If you know your tap water hardness and pH, it will be easier to decide on fish. The GH you can find out from the water supply folks, they may have a website. pH you can test, shake the water briskly to de-gas CO2 before testing tap water pH.

Byron.
Btw..... How long do I have to wait before I can start adding more fish??? My tank looks pretty sparse with the small community I have now. Thanks!!

I am itching to add more fish!!

I know I know patience patience young grasshopper......

I am really fighting with my type A personality on this one!
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post #8 of 20 Old 04-09-2012, 07:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Macrocosm View Post
Btw..... How long do I have to wait before I can start adding more fish??? My tank looks pretty sparse with the small community I have now. Thanks!!

I am itching to add more fish!!

I know I know patience patience young grasshopper......

I am really fighting with my type A personality on this one!
Once the plants are established, add fish a few at a time. In another thread plants were mentinoed, some are stem plants and these are fast growers so very good at removing ammonia.

Don't know the GH and pH of your tap water yet, so hard to say which fish.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If youíre going to take it under your wing then youíre responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #9 of 20 Old 04-09-2012, 07:25 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Byron View Post
Once the plants are established, add fish a few at a time. In another thread plants were mentinoed, some are stem plants and these are fast growers so very good at removing ammonia.

Don't know the GH and pH of your tap water yet, so hard to say which fish.
Don't know the GH yet.... But was told by the pet store it was really hard.
Aquarium home parameters are:

Temperature: 78
Ammonia, NH4: 0.5
Nitrate, NO3: 0
Nitrite, NO2: 0.25
pH: 7.8

for date: April 9, 2012
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post #10 of 20 Old 04-09-2012, 07:53 PM
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seems like your tank is still cycling, I would hold off on more fish untill you have a 0 reading on ammonia and nitrite, then add a few at a time. Meanwhile use the fish profiles like Byron suggested to see what else you may want, consider getting rid of glass cats or livebearers
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