What to do when ammonia or nitrite spikes occur?
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Beginner Freshwater Aquarium » What to do when ammonia or nitrite spikes occur?

What to do when ammonia or nitrite spikes occur?

This is a discussion on What to do when ammonia or nitrite spikes occur? within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> What do you do to bring them back down to 0?...

Check out these freshwater fish profiles
Platy
Platy
Bronze Cory
Bronze Cory
Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
What to do when ammonia or nitrite spikes occur?
Old 06-03-2007, 04:45 PM   #1
 
Tycoon's Avatar
 
What to do when ammonia or nitrite spikes occur?

What do you do to bring them back down to 0?
Tycoon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2007, 05:28 PM   #2
Rue
 
Rue's Avatar
 
...water changes...

...don't know if you can bring them fully down to 0 if your tank hasn't cycled...

...DON'T clean the media until you have established low nitrate levels...
Rue is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2007, 08:27 PM   #3
 
MattD's Avatar
 
Tycoon, iirc, you have a Betta bowl and a Betta right? If you don't have a filter, you can't let anything 'cycle'. You should invest in a nano filter then bro. Seriously it costs like under $15.00 and it does the job magnificently. It would really help your Betta out.

Otherwise massive water changes, done properly of course, will do the job to bring your levels down.
MattD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2007, 09:06 PM   #4
 
Tycoon's Avatar
 
no no no... im not talking about my betta here... im just asking the question because I plan on buying a 10-20 gl. soon and have a community tank of my own.


No offense to anyone but a betta in a 1 gallon tank is so boring to look at. I might exchange it for some guppies after I finish cycling my future tank. :)
Tycoon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2007, 09:28 PM   #5
 
MattD's Avatar
 
Oh. If you plan on getting a 10/20 gal, keep your Betta! Don't return/exchange him for some guppies. They're very pretty fish and your Betta will love room to spread his fins rather than just get returned to the crappy little cups on a shelf. :( :( :(
MattD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2007, 09:59 PM   #6
 
Tycoon's Avatar
 
i know its pretty sad but putting him in a tank filled with fancy guppies just won't work. Guppies are fin nippers and my betta might think of them as another male bettas with their fancy tails and starts shredding them to pieces. Now that would be a disaster.
Tycoon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2007, 10:17 PM   #7
 
MattD's Avatar
 
Ditch the Fancies then! BETTAS!!! THEY'RE BETTA!!
MattD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2007, 10:25 PM   #8
 
Tycoon's Avatar
 
But...but... i want a community tank... lol!


and lots of fishies swimming around together...
















*drools*

Tycoon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2007, 10:26 PM   #9
 
Many betta can live with other fish......... :D I have one betta with snails, and one betta with cardinal tetras. Everyone gets along fine. Lots of options, just stay away from long finned fish. :)
Stacey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2007, 11:57 AM   #10
 
mHeinitz57's Avatar
 
the key to starting any tank is patience! Most people try to stock their tank right off the bat and usually they end up with those spikes of ammonia and nitrite because the bacteria in the tank can't grow fast enough to handle the load. If you are deciding between 10 or 20...go 20. Once you have your 10 set up for awhile you'll wish you went bigger.
Once you set up the new tank, let it sit for a few days to let any saturated gasses dissipate out. Then start with a few strong fish. My personal reccommendation is a type of danio since it is a minnow fish that can withstand quite a bit. If you want something a little more colorful to look at, go with 2-3 gouramis (a relative to the betta). These fish are not extremely dirty and they usually can withstand the hardships of the nitrogen cycle.
If you leave the two fish in there and regularly use a bacterial supplement (Cycle, Stability or BioSpira are best) then you should have a smooth transition through the nitrogen cycle within 4-5 weeks. If you do water changes during that period it takes a little longer but with very few, hardy fish you shouldnt worry about that. Do not add fish till the cycle is done.
Once the cylce is complete, only add 2-3 fish at a time and give it 1-2 weeks before you add more. When you do water changes, only change about 25% and add a bacterial supplement when you do. Also get a good filter that holds bacteria well without you disturbing it. The Penguin Biowheels are awesome for small tanks like that. Just remember that the key thing is to be patient when starting up and stocking a tank. The majority of the problems my customers ever have is usually because they rushed things.
mHeinitz57 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Ammonia and Nitrite going up. What do I do? mattmathis Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 19 11-14-2009 07:27 PM
ammonia and nitrite levels SiennaSkye Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 3 08-11-2009 01:44 AM
Why should be test for ammonia/nitrite? hwoarangtag Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 3 11-06-2007 05:45 PM
PH, nitrite & ammonia help! mjjrules Ponds and Waterfalls 2 05-23-2007 09:47 AM
0 ammonia, 0 nitrite, 0 nitrate after 2 weeks? pbradley0 Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 12 03-23-2007 09:32 PM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:50 AM.