What do I need for a Red Cherry Shrimp Tank?
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Beginner Freshwater Aquarium » What do I need for a Red Cherry Shrimp Tank?

What do I need for a Red Cherry Shrimp Tank?

This is a discussion on What do I need for a Red Cherry Shrimp Tank? within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> So I'm leaning more and more towards having one of my 10 gal tanks a RCS Tank, But I've never had shrimp before, so ...

Check out these freshwater fish profiles
False Penguin Tetra
False Penguin Tetra
Harlequin Rasbora
Harlequin Rasbora
Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
What do I need for a Red Cherry Shrimp Tank?
Old 11-12-2008, 01:46 AM   #1
 
Cool What do I need for a Red Cherry Shrimp Tank?

So I'm leaning more and more towards having one of my 10 gal tanks a RCS Tank, But I've never had shrimp before, so thought I'd post to see if I can get some input.

I've seen some things mentioned...such as a Sponge Filter, Java Moss, and Driftwood. I haven't found any of these yet, but I'm just starting to look now. So in time I am sure I will find them.

So, would a sand substrate be best for RCS? What else should be included in a tank for them? What about water? I've seen a few pics online that show them in somewhat shallow water??? Is this the case? or is it just some illusion I'm seeing?

If a sponge filter is used, do i not need a HOTB filter?

Sorry for all the questions, but Like i said I've never dealt with them, heck let alone seen an RCS tank before looking online today.
SICFish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2008, 02:31 AM   #2
 
kritas's Avatar
 
If possible, get Eco-complete, or another soil substrate. Java moss isn't the only plant you can have. You could have Glossostigma(Glosso (Glossostigma elatinoides)), or Dwarf Hairgrass, Riccia Moss, or any type of moss. These types of plants allow you to see the CRS, and the CRS really love it. Driftwood isn't necessary like it is with Loricaridae, but it is an added bonus for the CRS.
A sponge filter is the only type necessary to filter a CRS's tank. A HOB filter runs the risk of sucking the shrimp into the intake hose.
I know nothing about this shallow water thing, but don't leave the water low.

Don't worry about asking so many questions. It's what we're here for.

Last edited by kritas; 11-12-2008 at 02:34 AM..
kritas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2008, 07:27 AM   #3
 
Tyyrlym's Avatar
 
I agree with Kirtas for the most part. I wouldn't say a plant substrate like Eco-Complete is absolutely necessary for something like java moss. It's not a bad idea but it's not necessary.

A sponge filter should be fine, the bio load of a shrimp is very low.

Sand is fine but so is gravel, which ever looks better to you.

My amanos do just fine in 18 inches of water.
Tyyrlym is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2008, 11:55 AM   #4
 
thanks for the info everyone...
SICFish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2008, 08:32 PM   #5
 
iamntbatman's Avatar
 
You definitely don't need Eco-complete for things like mosses, but it would be helpful for growing plants with more substantial roots. HOwever, I think cherries would be most visible over a light colored sand substrate.
iamntbatman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2008, 09:16 PM   #6
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by iamntbatman View Post
You definitely don't need Eco-complete for things like mosses, but it would be helpful for growing plants with more substantial roots. HOwever, I think cherries would be most visible over a light colored sand substrate.
I would think the opposite. From what I've seen, the shrimp really blend in with lighter colors, yet darker make some pop.
Cody is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2008, 09:22 PM   #7
 
iamntbatman's Avatar
 
I think it depends on the shrimp. The more expensive, brighter red varieties might look better over darker colors, but the more run-of-the-mill cherries are hard to see over dark substrates as they tend to be more transparent.
iamntbatman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2008, 09:24 PM   #8
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by iamntbatman View Post
I think it depends on the shrimp. The more expensive, brighter red varieties might look better over darker colors, but the more run-of-the-mill cherries are hard to see over dark substrates as they tend to be more transparent.
That is true... But then wouldn't they be *very* hard to see over a white substrate then? That's what I have heard, but as you said, it all depends on the shrimp color.
Cody is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2008, 09:25 PM   #9
 
iamntbatman's Avatar
 
Hmmm well, whatever the case, don't get red gravel. At least that one's a no-brainer.
iamntbatman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2008, 09:52 PM   #10
 
DOH! and here I was, thinking of a nice killer blood red type substrate! LOL j/k. But yea, we shall see what substrate I go with. I've never had any kind of planted aquarium...so we shall see.

As for rocks inside the tank, would it be good to have some bigger rocks for the shrimp to crawl around on or anything?
SICFish is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Cherry shrimp Dtld9 Fish Breeding 21 03-10-2008 10:19 AM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:07 PM.